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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
My client needed heated 210' x 25' road between 4 triplexes. It's a new site so hydronic was an easy decision, but the road type was not. All the contractors we talked to said concrete, we knew it was going to set us back more then asphalt but every plumber and dirt/road professional more then suggested concrete for a number of reasons. I wanted it for aesthetics, the plumber wanted it to keep heavy asphalt machines from driving over the hydronic tubing, the dirt professional didn't want to put another substrate down such as sand or a slurry to cover the tubing before asphalt to protect the tubing from above said risk, not to mention the added cost and time. Also, no matter what substrate we used under the ashpalt, the thermal transfer would be nill, especially sand. For these reasons and more, we went with concrete.

Well, the dust settled and my client is pissed! He said people do the asphalt "on the east coast" all the time, he thinks all the above worries are crap and is looking for a head to lob off, it may be mine. I think he's pissed about something entirely different and is projecting....I also think he missinformed or full of :censored:. Am I wrong? Shall I mention we got it done in time and under budget?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 · (Edited)
I looked at that specific website and others concerning electric options. One problem: 30w per foot x 4600ft = 138000 watts / 120vac = 1150amps = 4x0000(.46) cables to power the load.....I think you see what I'm getting at.

Also, the average temp and snowfall for this area is 35f/121inch. It would be prohibitively expensive to heat with electric.
 

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Youngster
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I've got the same issue right now. HO wants heated drive, but wants asphalt drive with stamped concrete borders. Electric is a no go. Must be hydronic. Read an article somewhere that prescribed dense foam underneath asphalt. Didn't know if that was kosher. What say all you pavers?
 

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I see it done around here quite often, especially in the richer neighborhoods. The dense foam usually wouldnt be a problem depending on the density of the foam they are prescribing. Asphalt has excellent tensile strength where as concrete does not. You would be surprised how much asphalt "gives" when heavy loads are driven over it.
 

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Youngster
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I see it done around here quite often, especially in the richer neighborhoods. The dense foam usually wouldnt be a problem depending on the density of the foam they are prescribing. Asphalt has excellent tensile strength where as concrete does not. You would be surprised how much asphalt "gives" when heavy loads are driven over it.
Would you be willing to ask around and see what density people are using around there? I've also heard of simply using crushed volcanic rock as an insulator in this case.
 

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Actually you are correct. Perlite volcanic rock will provide just as good of insulation and most foams. I think it actually will do a better job. Ofcourse this is just an opinion. If it were me I would go with the rock.
 

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Concrete Mike
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I see it done around here quite often, especially in the richer neighborhoods. The dense foam usually wouldnt be a problem depending on the density of the foam they are prescribing. Asphalt has excellent tensile strength where as concrete does not. You would be surprised how much asphalt "gives" when heavy loads are driven over it.
What? If that is true then why is airport runways made with concrete and not asphalt? Well the answer to that question is that concrete is better, harder, and lasts longer. Do it the correct way CONCRETE!!
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Concrete is the best way to go in terms of longevity and finished product, asphalt is a just used to save money. I believe it can be done by insulating the substrate, laying tubing, then adding a layer of sand or RAP to distribute the weight of the asphalt machine around the tubing.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
So it's all said and done and the feedback is massive, many say, "this drive will sell these units!" The owner said it was a good decision after all, and the asphalt guy who said I was off my rocker, actually apologized and said he was wrong about me. Good times!
 

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It's great everything worked out but I'm surprised that the plans didn't call out for what was going to be used. That would have removed any chance of getting in a big fight over what was supposed to be done......
 

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So it's all said and done and the feedback is massive, many say, "this drive will sell these units!" The owner said it was a good decision after all, and the asphalt guy who said I was off my rocker, actually apologized and said he was wrong about me. Good times!
Until the heating bills start rolling in :w00t:
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
What an extravagant waste
Amen to that, but the clients don't want to plow or shovel their walks or drives. This is a great solution for them. I guess if they sell......

However the road bill has not come in yet, the driveways are on the unit's individual billing and it's far less expensive then expected.
 
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