Contractor Talk - Professional Construction and Remodeling Forum banner
1 - 14 of 14 Posts

·
Registered
Contractor
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
We've been trying out some different types of concrete saws for cutting foundations for egress windows. If that's all we did, I'd probably go for a ring saw, but I can't justify the cost. For a dozen or so egress windows a year plus miscellaneous use, it seems the cut'n'break would be the best value. There are two Husqvarna models I'm looking at -- the electric K 4000 and the gas K 760. Does anyone have experience running both? We've had issues with fumes in the past so I'd really like to use the electric, but the specs are 5 HP for the gas vs 2.4 HP for the electric. Should I expect to cut significantly slower with the electric saw? Not sure how the numbers apply in real life...
 

·
Registered
Unbuilder of Eyesores
Joined
·
1,797 Posts
You can probably rent both from a place like Herc Rentals. I haven't used either, but researched them a bit. Supposedly they can be challenging to cut straight with.

I can buy an ICS gas chainsaw, bar, and blade for about $3,200. CS Unitech has a wall guide for chainsaws, so you can cut straight. I'm actually about to get on the phone and try to order one. By the way, CS Unitech, as far as I can tell, actually designed the ICS chainsaw. Look at them both, it's the same unit.
 

·
Registered
Unbuilder of Eyesores
Joined
·
1,797 Posts
You can probably rent both from a place like Herc Rentals. I haven't used either, but researched them a bit. Supposedly they can be challenging to cut straight with.

I can buy an ICS gas chainsaw, bar, and blade for about $3,200. CS Unitech has a wall guide for chainsaws, so you can cut straight. I'm actually about to get on the phone and try to order one. By the way, CS Unitech, as far as I can tell, actually designed the ICS chainsaw. Look at them both, it's the same unit.
Well, the Speedhook was discontinued, can't get it. I've been advised to simply anchor 2x4s to the wall, plunge the saw in, then run the motor housing against the wood as a fence.

I'm going to buy either a pneumatic or gas chainsaw, myself. Hydraulic has way more horsepower than pneumatic but I don't own a power pack.

Good luck, let us know which way you go and how it works out.
 

·
Registered
Butcher of wood and metal
Joined
·
7,123 Posts
I really like the system my concrete guy uses. Mounts a track to the wall the saw mounts to it. Like a 30" wheel. Air run saw. Makes super nice straight cut, don't even have to mess with them when he is done.
 

·
Contractor
Joined
·
7,792 Posts
I have a k3000 electric 14" wheel saw, it cuts ok but does not have the power of a gas saw and cuts much slower. It's easy to overload and will trip breakers if you don't have it on a dedicated 20 Amp circuit.

I have a gas Makita 14" wheel saw, you can push it to the limit and it does not give up. But you have the exhaust to deal with.

I also have a Partner k950 chain saw that I use for cutting wall openings. The chains are costly, it makes a big ass wet mess of everybody and everything, but cuts like a beast.

I have an opening to cut next week, not really looking forward to it, but it's work.

If I could find a wide blade for the wheel saw that the chainsaw would fit in the cut, I would use a combination of the two. First cut with the wheel, then follow up and clean the corners with the chainsaw.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,885 Posts
I have used both the gas and electric version of the cut n brake saw. I own a gas one and I rent and electric one if necessary

The electric is definitely short on power

It will cut whatever you need to however you have to be patient, The gas saw has way more power

Another thing I hate about the electric is the stupid GFI.

It is located on the very end of the cord which sits on the ground so when you pull the cord while cutting if you tap anything with the GFI it trips, You move the cord and cause a GFI to bounce it trips, you accidentally kick the GFI it trips, something tabs a GFI it trips. You get the idea. I spend a lot of time resetting the GFI

In a perfect world working on a flat surface with nothing around it is not an issue however I rarely work in a perfect world. There’s always scaffolding, debris or something else around that bumps the GFI and trips it while moving the saw during cutting

Otherwise it’s a good saw, not ideal if you’re only going to cut concrete, but the beauty of the cut in break is in theory all of your cutting should be done from the outside cutting in

Gas fumes shouldn’t be an issue
 

·
Registered
Butcher of wood and metal
Joined
·
7,123 Posts
I have a k3000 electric 14" wheel saw, it cuts ok but does not have the power of a gas saw and cuts much slower. It's easy to overload and will trip breakers if you don't have it on a dedicated 20 Amp circuit.

I have a gas Makita 14" wheel saw, you can push it to the limit and it does not give up. But you have the exhaust to deal with.

I also have a Partner k950 chain saw that I use for cutting wall openings. The chains are costly, it makes a big ass wet mess of everybody and everything, but cuts like a beast.

I have an opening to cut next week, not really looking forward to it, but it's work.

If I could find a wide blade for the wheel saw that the chainsaw would fit in the cut, I would use a combination of the two. First cut with the wheel, then follow up and clean the corners with the chainsaw.
I did some basement floor cutting a few years ago gas with one of those. tube exhaust fan. Never again, fumes where bad. Rentals electric one with vac someone messed up.
 

·
Registered
Contractor
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I appreciate the responses. Reggi, I did find an electric one at United. Another local place has one on rent and just ordered a second one, so perhaps it's not so bad. I've never had trouble cutting straight lines as long as my guide lines are straight 😅 We're picking it up today to cut slab but have a door to cut in a couple weeks. We'll see how it goes...

Windicity that's a good point on the GFI. I wonder if rigging up a twist lock would help at all. I can deal with taking a little longer on the cuts as long as it's not excruciatingly slow. We set off the CO alarm in the house on the last egress window with fumes blowing through the cut, which really made me step back and think as we had never seen that before. Maybe some negative pressure in that area that sucked it in, but I'm sure some fumes get in regardless and that's unhealthy for the occupants (and for the guy sitting in a 5 ft. pit too...). We decided if we used a gas saw on the next one we'd hook up a hose to route the exhaust out.
 

·
Registered
Butcher of wood and metal
Joined
·
7,123 Posts
I appreciate the responses. Reggi, I did find an electric one at United. Another local place has one on rent and just ordered a second one, so perhaps it's not so bad. I've never had trouble cutting straight lines as long as my guide lines are straight 😅 We're picking it up today to cut slab but have a door to cut in a couple weeks. We'll see how it goes...

Windicity that's a good point on the GFI. I wonder if rigging up a twist lock would help at all. I can deal with taking a little longer on the cuts as long as it's not excruciatingly slow. We set off the CO alarm in the house on the last egress window with fumes blowing through the cut, which really made me step back and think as we had never seen that before. Maybe some negative pressure in that area that sucked it i to route the exhaust out.
If you are inside with a gas one it is hard to get the fumes out enough to not cause problems even with the exhaust fan.
 
1 - 14 of 14 Posts
Top