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Discussion Starter #1
How should I wire this bathroom? Also which breaker should I tie it into? I have one 15 amp breaker that is just running the Bath Fan upstairs and one 15 amp breaker just running the GFCI plug in the Bathroom upstairs.
 

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We have to wire bathrooms on a 20 Amp GFCI circuit here. Either way I would come off the GFCI to the 2 gang switch box, then run a switch leg to the vanity light and a switch leg to the shower light and feed through to the fan. You could hit the fan first and then feed through to the shower light depending on if the fan box has enough cubes for 2 12-2 wires. I like to run power into the switch box if I can, then I can stick the majority of my connections and wire nuts into the bigger box, and I know where my feeder is for future trouble shooting, to me it's just a cleaner installation.

I suppose you could run your feeder across the ceiling and jump down with your two switch legs if you wish too but you will have 3 12-2 wires in two of your boxes on the ceiling.
 

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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
I live in Utah do you know if the 20A dedicated Breaker is required here? When did that become a requirement? I also did some addition research and found (NEC reference) that if a 20A circuit for my bathroom upstairs is only serving the GFCI receptacle that I could add the New bathrooms GFCI receptacle to that circuit and it will be code. And the fan and lights I could wire to my circuit that runs the upstairs exhaust fan. Is this correct?
 

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DGR,IABD
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A bathroom receptacle must be served with a 20 amp circuit (#12 on a 20 amp breaker).

Here's where the confusion starts, because you have some options:

1) That 20 amp circuit may serve everything in just one bathroom,

-or-

2) That 20 amp circuit may serve only receptacles in multiple bathrooms.

IF a circuit serves a bathroom receptacle and anything else (like lights and fans) it may not leave the bathroom to serve other stuff. If the circuit serves only a bathroom receptacle, it may leave that bathroom only to serve another bathroom receptacle.

If you can arrange it so that you can serve your bath receptacles off one 20 amp circuit, and then do the fans and light off another 15 or 20 amp circuit, you will be in compliance. The circuit that serves the fans and lights in the bathroom(s) may serve lights and receptacles in other parts of the home if need be, and you'll still be in compliance. It's the receptacle circuit that they're fussy about.

The bathroom receptacles must be GFCI protected. Whether you do that with a GFCI breaker or a GFCI receptacle is totally up to you. The lights and fans do not need GFCI protection unless they are over the tub or shower.
 

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I'm with Mike. Well done! It's so hard to find someone who speaks basic English nowdays.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thanks MD. That reassures me. I will put the GFCI outlet on the 20 amp circuit that is running only the existing bathroom gfci outlet right now. I will put the vanity light, fan and shower light on the breaker that is running my upstairs bathroom fan. (so I need to make this a GFCI Breaker because I have a light in the shower right?)
 

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Rspainhower
You need to use gfci on the light circuit only if the ul listed fixture that you use has instructions or label requiring its use. The ul listed shower lights that I use do not require the use of a gfci device.
 
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