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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
It is a 20 year old shed. the post are rotted and are just sitting on the ground(above ground good yet). Should i put the new post next to the the old and notch together or put new one underneath with 2x6s on sides? Anyone any prior experience? Thanks ahead
 

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Chief outhouse engineer
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Smeagol,
I have seen it done several ways. A lot of farmers will dig down beside the old post and put in an new 8' post about 3.5' in ground and 4.5 out. then bolt through old and new post with about three 3/4" threaded rod.

One of the local businesses in Indiana started manufacturing an cement base with a metal spade that can be inserted into the good portion of the old post. Some guys are using this for new construction as the cement base is rated for 50 years I think.

I have personally sandwiched old posts and boxed them in also. Usually overlap at least 3 feet.

More than one way to skin this cat.
 
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Lack Of All Trades
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It is a 20 year old shed. the post are rotted and are just sitting on the ground(above ground good yet). Should i put the new post next to the the old and notch together or put new one underneath with 2x6s on sides? Anyone any prior experience? Thanks ahead
Build temporary braces to support the shed walls. Then just cut/pull/dig the old one's out. Then re-plan the entire layout--digging your new post holes.
 

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Smeagol,
I have seen it done several ways. A lot of farmers will dig down beside the old post and put in an new 8' post about 3.5' in ground and 4.5 out. then bolt through old and new post with about three 3/4" threaded rod.

One of the local businesses in Indiana started manufacturing an cement base with a metal spade that can be inserted into the good portion of the old post. Some guys are using this for new construction as the cement base is rated for 50 years I think.

I have personally sandwiched old posts and boxed them in also. Usually overlap at least 3 feet.

More than one way to skin this cat.
I don't know what kind of post hole digger you have, but I can't go further than 2 1/2 feet with mine. The handles get boxed into the hole (unless you widen the hole big enough to bury your neighbor's Rottweiler?)
Steve
 

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I don't know what kind of post hole digger you have, but I can't go further than 2 1/2 feet with mine. The handles get boxed into the hole (unless you widen the hole big enough to bury your neighbor's Rottweiler?)
Steve
Maybe he used an auger? Hmmmmm;)
 

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We did a complete professional riding arena. Here is how we did it -

1- House moving company supported structure with cribbing.
2- Cut off rotten posts about 4' off ground
3- Had backhoe excavate for new sono tubes, and poured new 18" tubes, four feet deep. With anchors.
4- Installed new posts in anchors up to the cut off posts, then installed new 2x lumber both sides of posts.
5- Remove cribbing and you're done. :thumbsup:
 

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Chief outhouse engineer
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I don't know what kind of post hole digger you have, but I can't go further than 2 1/2 feet with mine. The handles get boxed into the hole (unless you widen the hole big enough to bury your neighbor's Rottweiler?)
Steve


Helps to be smarter than the tool your using. :whistling

If you fill the digger with dirt, you don't need a big hole to pull it up. I used to set 10' posts in the ground 5' like that. :thumbsup: (I was a lot tougher and more desperate back then.)

If your digging in bedrock or something like that, get a mounted auger.:thumbsup:
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
thanks for the input. I am going to auger down 4 1/2 feet, throw a cement cookie in there, pound it down with the new 8' post and notch out 2 " of the existing post for some bearing then use 3/4" threaded rod and some torx screws
 

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I would suggest bury 3' and leave 5' up-use four 1/2" carriage bolts to hold the two posts together. No need for the notching out of the old post-if anything, if you're intent on doing so, use a 4x6 to sister and slip the full original 4x4 onto the 2" notched out new 4x6...but for a regular shed that would be a bit overkill.
 
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