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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I need to rack my cabin several inches back to its position from a couple years ago. Because of its location and how's its built, it will be alot easier to push than to pull (cable/come along). Are there any ways to apply a significant pushing force with a 15 - 20' arm with a minimal risk of buckling? I could push from outside using the ground or from inside using the floor structure. In either case the push line would be at about 20 degrees from horiz.

Any ideas? Thanks, Dave
 

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Have you determined yet why it racked in the first place?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I dont know for sure why it moved but probably either snow and/or wind...its in the mountains. The reason it moved easily is because there are no interior walls anymore (temporary for construct.) providing shear and the exterior walls in that direction are original (1860) and provide almost no shear. It needs to be braced but I want to move it back before I do that. Dave
 

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Finish Carpenter
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...I had a shed/bunkhouse that was racked...has a buddy bump his truck's bumper to one corner, I bumped my truck's bumper to the opposite and pushed... Put the truck in park (e-brake and 1st gear low), got out and braced the wall in place....

like I said...it was a shed/bunkhouse....nothing fancy, didn't even have to be semi-perfect, just tolerable but it worked....:jester:
 

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i had a collar tie connection fail in my old house and racked that section of the gable by posting with a jack to the ridge beam and pushing on the outside plate with the mini excavator. posted up with a make-shift column made from stapled together 2x stock and bottle jack, throttled back on the mini, pushed, and jacked. all very slowly. did the job.
 

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Are you a GC ? I missed your intro.

I don't think many of us would be interested in getting you headed in the right direction without some understanding why you have eliminated some of the most straightforward and safest ways to accomplish this simple task.

Please explain what is keeping you from pulling as it is the best way to accomplish your goal with the least risk.

Your explanation my well work as your intro.
 

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Rails System

I would try to slide pressure treated planks underneath it and to the area it will permanently rest, to act as slider "rails", like railroad tracks.

I'd use 2x 12s to help distribute the weight of the cabin evenly over the ground. If you don't use a rail system to slide the cabin, it will PLOW into the ground you are pushing it toward.

You will need to start on the front or back side and EVENLY jack it up to slide your planks underneath. If there is no room to get underneath for jacking, just dig shallow holes, lay wood blocking on the base so your jacks don't sink into the dirt as you start applying pressure.

Small hydraulic jacks will work fine if its a small cabin. Once you get your slider planks underneath, I'd use a long 6X6 on the base, perpendicular to the direction you will be pushing, to distrubute the force along the whole front base you are pushing against.

Actually, if you could get a timber that is longer than your cabin is wide, I'd have the timber extend beyond each side in the front and use come-a-longs to PULL it back where you want it.

When you do get it back, I'd get a dirt auger and place pressure treated posts into the ground in the corners to prevent it from moving in the future.
 

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Steel I Beam

Actually, once your slider rails are in place, I'd just get a large steel I Beam that's longer than your cabin is wide and use come-a-longs to PULL it back.

I local steel scrap yard would probably have one you could use or buy cheap and then just sell it back to them when you're done.
 

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I once worked for a "master carpenter" who sheathed the walls on the ground before tipping them in place. After assembling the walls he was inches out of plumb.

We straightened everything out over a couple days with come alongs, sawz-alls, and nail pullers; while the master carpenter ate a healthy slice of humble-pie.

Have a hard time picturing a circumstance when pushing would be easier than pulling with come alongs, especially if the problem is coming from racking.

Only other obvious cause if its an old building would be settling. Around here the field stone foundations settle into the ground, as the sills get lower they begin to rot. If thats the cause, you need to jack and replace the sills and build up the foundation. I'd imagine if you racked one of these buildings plumb, you'd be so far out of level , you'd be able to slide down the halls.
 

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Get something stable next to it to push off. This may be as simple as a good stake in the ground, or a 2x with a kicker on it. Then put a high-low jack between the building and your jacking point and have your way with the biatch.
 

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not sure how big the cabin is but I usually use a 2x6 or 2x4 (depending on the amont of force required) and from a block nailed to the floor or from an opposite wall at the floor , place a 2x6 diagonally to the top plate, then bend the board downward and have a helper nail a block above it on the wall (or a slide plate) and then let the board straighten its self thus pushing the wall over.

Line Architecture Triangle Parallel Rectangle

You may have to reset this a few times if you have to move the wall substantially.

Then, of course, you must brace the wall to keep it plumb in that direction while you move the structure in the other. There are other ways also...think McGyver!
 
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