Contractor Talk - Professional Construction and Remodeling Forum banner
1 - 20 of 34 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
420 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
i had to replace an 8 year old (i installed new) exterior steel door with wood jamb today because the jamb was completely rotted on the bottom. some rot on top brick moulding even. and even the door panel itself looked swelled on the bottom. this door doesnt see sun, so perhaps it stays wetter longer....menards mastercraft door by the way. not buying these again :sad:
anyways i see a lot of wood exterior door jams rotting on less than 10 year old homes.
what can i do to prevent rot without having to go with more expensive composite jambs?

on the door install today, i removed the threshold and painted the bottom frame edges. not sure if this will help.
is it better to caulk the frame to the aluminum threshold, or will that trap moisture?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
85 Posts
Mtg typically requires 3' overhang as part of the warranty. Rain splash from a lack of gutters, overflowing gutters etc create moisture problems.

The door supplier I just makes a custom jamb with the bottom 8-12" a moisture composite.

Before installing jambs, brick moldings, be sure to paint all sides and edges with paint or water proof material. The caulk everything well. Most rot comes from water being wicked up the edge or through paint cracks caused when shoes, wheels etc hit the jamb/molding

Sent from my XT1053 using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
420 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
why cant jambs be made of treated lumber?
but i guess door manufacturers like the fact you'll be buying a new door down the road....disposable society..
 

·
Registered
Butcher of wood and metal
Joined
·
7,658 Posts
Probably dryer climate here , but I wrap mine then caulk the bottom seems to work well. Also for around a $100 or so more can install one with an extruded aluminum jambs.
 

·
Registered
Remodel
Joined
·
35,719 Posts
Treated lumber has been used for these and windows for a LONG time. It just isn't CCA or ACQ. It just takes a fungicide, and there are plenty of fungicides for interior use.

Most jambs with this problem have a cut end that allows the water to wick up the wood. I've seen them start rot in 2 years, even with full sun South East exposure. Painting over does nothing except give you prettier rotted wood.
 

·
Registered
Remodel
Joined
·
35,719 Posts
I've never seen a really old jamb sealed on the backside, plus they had a lot of air leakage.

Prime4s, caulk the bottom to keep water out (really, it just traps water that runs down the door), make sure your gasketing keeps air flow to a minimum - it's pretty much a perfect recipe for rot.

Put a storm door over it all, and you can use almost any jamb.
 

·
Premium Member
Honolulu, Hawaii
Joined
·
19,984 Posts

·
I like Green things
Joined
·
23,081 Posts
1 - 20 of 34 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top