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I'm working on my brothers condo bathroom floor (cement slab) and we've used the same ungauged slate in there that we used in the kitchen/entry to maintain a good flow.

Now that it's time to get the toilet on, we are noticing it's an issue. I chose the best pieces to go together around the flange that seemed to be as level as ungauged slate gets. Noticing it's out a few mm makes me think the toilet won't sit level. What are some tips on ensuring the toilet is installed properly now, and for future installs?

Any insight is most welcome. Thanks in advance.
 

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I'm working on my brothers condo bathroom floor (cement slab) and we've used the same ungauged slate in there that we used in the kitchen/entry to maintain a good flow.

Now that it's time to get the toilet on, we are noticing it's an issue. I chose the best pieces to go together around the flange that seemed to be as level as ungauged slate gets. Noticing it's out a few mm makes me think the toilet won't sit level. What are some tips on ensuring the toilet is installed properly now, and for future installs?

Any insight is most welcome. Thanks in advance.
You can knock the really high spots off with a grinder (taking care not to go beyond the footprint of the toilet), but minor variations as you describe are typical for that material, and will require toilet shims as Precision mentioned.
 

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Thom
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shim the commode to make it steady, but only if it needs it to be steady with no weight on it.

Pack grout around the base of the commode against the floor. Pack it in real tight. Use sanded grout. Let it set up a few days before applying weight to the commode.

If you used shims, remove the shims and pack those spots with grout.

If you trim your grout neatly it will look fine.

If their is no wobble and the commode is fairly tight just caulk it with silicone caulk. Fill as deep as you can.

If you want to get fancy, you can mix the grout with silicone to get the right color apply it, then dust the surface with grout before the silicone dries.
 

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Agreed Thom. Grouting is a great method even if you have a flat and level floor to set the toilet on because the toilet's base isn't going to be perfect.

I'm not sold on caulking the toilet to the floor due to possible leaks being hidden and found on the ceiling below rather than running out under the toilet. But, I guess it depends on the leak too. Or, at least caulk around the front and sides and leave the back open and hopefully if there is a problem, it'll flow out there.
 

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You can knock the really high spots off with a grinder (taking care not to go beyond the footprint of the toilet), but minor variations as you describe are typical for that material, and will require toilet shims as Precision mentioned.
You don't even need to use a grinder just chisel down the high spots it will flake right off, and you can go beyond the toilet with this method if needed
 

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You don't even need to use a grinder just chisel down the high spots it will flake right off, and you can go beyond the toilet with this method if needed
A grinder gives you more control. I will certainly chip away easily--but you may get it shaling off more than you want.

As for going beyond, I disagree. You can do a lot with the material, but tool marks are going to show if you go chipping away at it willy-nilly.
 

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Ya, you have to be careful but if it is one of the flaky types of slate with lots of spauling and clefting you can lay the chisel flat and knock off a few layers.
Works for the high spots at gout joints and transitions also.
 

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I'm working on my brothers condo bathroom floor (cement slab) and we've used the same ungauged slate in there that we used in the kitchen/entry to maintain a good flow.

Now that it's time to get the toilet on, we are noticing it's an issue. I chose the best pieces to go together around the flange that seemed to be as level as ungauged slate gets. Noticing it's out a few mm makes me think the toilet won't sit level. What are some tips on ensuring the toilet is installed properly now, and for future installs?

Any insight is most welcome. Thanks in advance.
R U Serius?
 

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Paul
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I disagree with grouting or caulking toilet bases. What happens if the seal leaks.....could take quite a while to notice, and when you finally do :sick::surrender:

I'd rather know about any kind of leak immediately, much less black water.
 

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Paul
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So I guess when the grout turns brown you have a leak... :Cleveland voice: "Thaaaats Naaaaaasty"
 

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Best to get the toilet set right so there's no issues. Out of curiosity, how do you deal with the gaps between the toilet and floor? For example, place a call to Kohler and you'll find their toilet specs allow + or - 1/4. What would you do with a 1/4" gap?
 

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This has been working for at least 100 yrs.

Use sheet lead @ two points in the back and one in the front. Cut the lead with tinsnips about 1/2" wide and a smack with a hammer can make fine adjustments. Set them back about 1/8", more if the floor is really uneven.

When level, pack the gap with grout. Leave about 1-2" gap in the back. When the grout has set, use a putty knife to push a small piece of screen into the gap to keep little critters out.
 

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Thom
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As an interesting aside here, it seems some of you leave the base of the commode as is when installing. We are required to grout or caulk commodes to the floor here. The inspectors check every one.
 

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Paul
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No not some Thom, just me. I used to install down in FL, Teetor.... in exactly your neck of the woods. For several years. Never saw a single toilet done that way. They were all grouted solid to the slab. You guys have your way and I've got mine....been serving me just fine for 15 years. In that span I have never encountered a situation where grouting was necessary. But then again I do floor prep. I am the floor guy, so if the floor is really uneven my job was done wrong. If you set a toilet on the crown of a hill, I suppose you could run into those problems. SLC is a wonderful thing.

Not saying you guys are wrong, mind you, It's just not my way of doing it.

I'm sure somebody will run along and tell me how wrong I am though.
 
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