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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Howdy
First off i am a concrete guy and short of burying this thing in concrete i do not know how to handle this leak. Below are some pictures of a problem area on a roof where an addition meets the original house. Its a fixer upper for a rental so i have to address this myself. It appears the roof has leaked off and on for years. There are shingles under the tin roof of the addition and i assume they tinned it to try and solve the original leak. I know its more of a water management issue but how to address it i am unsure. I would greatly appreciate your input on how to effectively correct this issue for the long term. Thanks Fred






 

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You say your a concrete guy . Why your trade say custom cabinet maker .
That'd be some sweet concrete cabinets. He'd corner the market.
As for the roof, I vote go with what you know, bury it in concrete.


E - What pitch is the lower section? If its 3/12 or better I would be tempted to just I/w the whole thing and shingle it. Would need to rip off all the siding, fascia wrap etc to do it right. That pitch is very unforgiving in regards to flashing's, I would use minimum 5x5 steps.. The hardest spot would be where it almost touches the upper roof. I would probably have some oversized step flashings made up that I could fold under the upper roof 4" or so. Tough spot, even in experienced hands.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 · (Edited)
You say your a concrete guy . Why your trade say custom cabinet maker .

I do not know why, i do not recall when i signed up awhile back having to make a selection. Thanks for letting me know and i will see how to correct it. THanks

ETA made the correction, only thing i can think of is my father in law does custom cabinet work, thanks again for letting me know.
 

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Thom
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It was improperly flashed, someone tried to fix that with plastic roof cement, someone tried to fix that with plastic roof cement......

Start by cleaning off all of the plastic roof cement. Seal the flashing at the underside with silicone or elastomeric, Then you can do cheap and dirty repairs with elastomeric and fabric.

Imbed the fabric in elastomeric base coat, make sure it is thoroughly embedded in a thick coat. Then, a couple days later put on a top coat, a couple days after that, another top coat. If you use elastomeric to seal the bottom side of the flashing use the thick stuff (butter grade?), it has the consistency of plastic roof cement.

The buckets (5 gallon) of elastomeric will cost about $125 each, the butter grade will be closer to $150. Don't rush it, don't skimp on materials, you should be able to get it done for about $1,000. labor and materials, then add your standard markup.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
It was improperly flashed, someone tried to fix that with plastic roof cement, someone tried to fix that with plastic roof cement......

Start by cleaning off all of the plastic roof cement. Seal the flashing at the underside with silicone or elastomeric, Then you can do cheap and dirty repairs with elastomeric and fabric.

Imbed the fabric in elastomeric base coat, make sure it is thoroughly embedded in a thick coat. Then, a couple days later put on a top coat, a couple days after that, another top coat. If you use elastomeric to seal the bottom side of the flashing use the thick stuff (butter grade?), it has the consistency of plastic roof cement.

The buckets (5 gallon) of elastomeric will cost about $125 each, the butter grade will be closer to $150. Don't rush it, don't skimp on materials, you should be able to get it done for about $1,000. labor and materials, then add your standard markup.

Are you speaking of doing something similar to the elastomeric sealing like they do around chimneys? Thanks

 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
As a follow up question..... Can the elastomeric coating go over the original roofing cement, or some residue of it? I venture that it would be almost impossible to get all of the old cement off first unless someone has a nifty way to remove it more effectively than just scraping it off. Thanks
 

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That will require a roofer to fix properly, its an abortion. Keep smearing henrys on it if you must, but at some point your gonna have to pay.

If that was mine to deal with i would pay to get it fixed. Who wants to toss and turn at night every time it rains wondering when you will get that call its leaking again. Not to mention the interior damage and costs to fix that in addition to having to still go back on the roof.
 

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Extend the valley past the next 9" o.c. bump by sliding more valley underneath it. Then bend up some metal at an acute angle to divert water from sidewall/facia problem area. You are basically making a little gutter to put under your just extended valley. I would back sure the back of bent piece is tall enough to tuck behind the roof edge. good luck
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
That will require a roofer to fix properly, its an abortion. Keep smearing henrys on it if you must, but at some point your gonna have to pay.

If that was mine to deal with i would pay to get it fixed. Who wants to toss and turn at night every time it rains wondering when you will get that call its leaking again. Not to mention the interior damage and costs to fix that in addition to having to still go back on the roof.
Thats my intention here, to get it fixed. I just acquired the place and i need to get it fixed. I would like to do it myself if for nothing else to learn how to do it properly, i just need to know the proper information on how to do it properly and i will get it done. Thanks for your input!
 

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Take it all apart and when you put it back together, do it right.......
So have new clean panels and trim. (Or spend a day cleaning what you got)
Get some some flashing (roof to wall) and butyl tape.
Some benders and snips.

Leave the Ice & Water Shield at the store.
 

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Denali......

Just a little different approach/idea....

No question that's a holy mess up there and should be cleaned up...

But, are you certain of the source of the leak..... clearly it is/maybe highly likely around there.... but while it's a crap job, by the same token it does appear well sealed (sorta).

We can't assess the source of your interior leak, but drips can follow rafters along way before they become evident in a ceiling stain, and can really fool you as to the actual source of the leak.

Can you replicate the leak.... maybe by starting with a hose at the very lowest slopes for 20 minutes and moving up untill you get the leak.

Under what conditions does the leak appear... for instance snow damns, just very heavy rains.... or rains driven from a specific direction.

I found a leak on one home that no one could find, untill we discovered that it was only a heavy directional wind that was lifting the starter course at the very gable peak..... through the attic and 30-40 feet away in the kitchen ceiling. (Took 12 roofing nails to solve... and some climbing rope).

Found another that was evidencing itself around a bank of window jambs.... previous work had retrimmed/ flashed windows/caulked etc.... and it was a skylight way above on the roof line.

Found both of those by replicating the leak with a hose.....



Just saying......might be worth the time to chase down..... but everyone agrees that that valley and wall flashing should be cleaned up.

Best
 

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That looks like an older "pro-panel"

First thing is wheres the screws? I see some goobers that may be covering them.....THIS IS A NONO and makes leaks worse
Second is there seam tape?
Third where is the actualy flashing? I see crappy pooky job thats probebly made the leaks worse

I know the feeling of wanting to save a $ but if your over your head call someone who isnt and save the headache and probebly $ in the longrun
 

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If it's for a rental... think long-term... that roof is protecting you from spending more money below... five things you should never go cheap on with rentals... roof's, foundations, HVAC, electrical and plumbing... and by cheap, I mean hacking your way to a solution... do it right the first time and forget about it...
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
If it's for a rental... think long-term... that roof is protecting you from spending more money below... give things you should never go cheap on with rentals... roof's, foundations, HVAC, electrical and plumbing... and by cheap, I mean hacking your way to a solution... do it right the first time and forget about it...
Thanks for the help so far guys! Yes it is for a rental, i just need to do a proper repair to get me through the winter with it until late next spring or early summer when i will re roof the whole main part of the house and can flash that area properly. As far as the tin section of the roof goes i am not sure if i will leave it tinned or remove it and go back to shingles on it. It looks to be in good shape other than the are of the leak.
 

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Thom
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Are you speaking of doing something similar to the elastomeric sealing like they do around chimneys? Thanks


Similar but, the shingles need to be on top of the elastomeric with the elastomeric sealing them from the bottom. When done properly elastomeric has a good track record, just don't buy cheap materials.

Remove all the plastic roof cement. Get up there with a 6" taping knife and a torch, don't forget the fire-extinguisher or hose. Heating up the plastic roof cement will soften it so you can scrape it.

Plastic roof cement shrinks and cracks. you don't want those cracks there they will eventually damage whatever you put on top.

Several have suggested tearing things apart then reconstructing properly. Though that is the best way to do it you are likely to find the never-ending series of consequential damages. Removing the metal will show rotted sheathing. That means removing more metal and replacing sheathing. Removing the sheathing may show damaged joists.....................

So, doing it properly is certainly preferable but your customer may be unwilling to pay for proper repairs. As long as your customer is aware of what may be there and that you are applying a band-aid you should be ok. You customer should also know that those joints will need regular maintenance.
 
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So, doing it properly is certainly preferable but your customer may be unwilling to pay for proper repairs. As long as your customer is aware of what may be there and that you are applying a band-aid you should be ok. You customer should also know that those joints will need regular maintenance.
If I read post # 10 right it is the OP's place and it is going to be a rental.
 
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