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Just Jennifer - The Paint
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Rubbing Furniture Finishes:

Using a sanding block, always working with the grain, sand your piece to mirror flat. Start with 220 grit sandpaper and finish with 150 grit. I use a wood block for sanding.

Use wood filler to fill the pores creating a flat surface that will evenly absorb lacquer. Apply a thin coat of wood filler over the entire surface. Scrape off excess with a scraper, using firm pressure and scraping against the grain of the wood, to push the filler into the pores. Allow to sit for a few hours, be sure the filler is completely dry. Sand lightly along the grain of the wood, using 150 grit sandpaper until all filler on the surface is no longer visible.

Apply your stain and allow to dry completely.

Apply multiple coats of the finish product. (Lacquer or Polyurethane)

Wet sand at 400 grit, then 600, 800 & finally 1000. Make sure to wet wipe away all dust slurry between grits! Use clean rag for each wipe. T-shirt material works really well.

Now sprinkle the surface with pumice and water and rub along the grain until you have a nice satin finish. Add a bit more water if the material is drying out. Take care that you clean all traces of the pumice!

To bring the finish to a high gloss sprinkle rotten-stone over the surface and a sprinkle of vegetable oil. As you did with the pumice, rub the rotten-stone and oil until you reach the gloss level you prefer.

Finish up with a light coat of furniture paste wax and buff it out.


DONE!

Notes:
Rubbed finishes look much like a French Polish but are easier to achieve and more durable.

Lacquer is easiest to rub out. Polyurethane can also be rubbed and is more durable BUT one must take great care to avoid sanding or rubbing through any of the applied layers. That would ruin the finish!

I continue to use a wood block to sand right up until I get to the pumice stage.
 

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Sawdust follows Me Everywhere
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2K poly let it dry for a few days to fully cure. Sand with 800 grit Abranet using a vacuum on your sander. Switch over to Abralon and start at 1000 use some water for lubrication (no vacuum this time). Wipe the surface and switch to 2000 grit and repeat until you finish up at 4000. Then use a buffer with some compound to bring it to a brilliant gloss.
 

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Just Jennifer - The Paint
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261 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
2K poly let it dry for a few days to fully cure. Sand with 800 grit Abranet using a vacuum on your sander. Switch over to Abralon and start at 1000 use some water for lubrication (no vacuum this time). Wipe the surface and switch to 2000 grit and repeat until you finish up at 4000. Then use a buffer with some compound to bring it to a brilliant gloss.
True Enough! Still, when doing antiques, one tries to replicate the original finish. It's good to know how to do that. The same would be true for a French polish, it is not a very practical finish and can be easily ruined but some pieces demand it, anyway. I do get where your coming from, though.
 

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General Contractor - Residential
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Ah. This is about something entirely……….Different. 😳🤨


I was just about to flag this thread. Nevermind. Carry on. 👍









😳
When I read the thread title I immediately thought this would be a thread that Kowboy could get into
 

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Just Jennifer - The Paint
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261 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 · (Edited)
Boiled linseed oil.
RIGHT! I should have figured that out! I don't do much in oil finishes of any kind BUT I often soak old, fragile wood in boiled linseed oil to revive it a bit in the hope of preventing future splitting. That does seem to work well. Then I wash the surface well in preparation for other finishes.

Here is a laugh for you: There have been DIYers who have tried boiling linseed oil to make boiled linseed oil :ROFLMAO:, needless to say, it did not go well!!!
 

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I don't know why someone would want boiled and buy raw. It makes no sense.

If you wanted some of the old linseed oil based varnishes, you may have to make those yourself, but who wants that stuff.
 

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Just Jennifer - The Paint
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261 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I don't know why someone would want boiled and buy raw. It makes no sense.

If you wanted some of the old linseed oil based varnishes, you may have to make those yourself, but who wants that stuff.
Clearly, they had some linseed oil laying around and thought they'd save a trip to the store, the story is apocryphal.
I would not want to do a linseed oil finish with so many wonderful oil finishes on the market. I actually don't want to do oil finishes, at all. People don't know how to care for an oil finish! They are forever messing them up.
 
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