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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am a HVAC / mechanical contractor in real life, but I have been fiddling with this porch roof on the back of my house for 20 years now. It is a fairly shallow pitch (I would guess about 3 in 12) roof.

the porch roof had older 3-tabs on it when I bought the place but when I expanded the carport to which the porch connects on one side I stripped, felted and re applied new 3-tabs. At it's higher side the porch roof blends into the 12 in 12 pitch of the back roof of the house which was also re-done in 3-tab.

The porch roof seems to have leaked ever since I started working on it, but it may have leaked before - it's just been too long to remember. At one point I stripped it and applied rolled roofing with the 25% overlaps sealed with roof coating and closely nailed.

My actual question comes from the fact that when we do commercial work I see what seems to be a black rubber roof system with glued seams. We have also had to re-flash a few A/C units with white rolled rubber material and glue too. Both seem like a real water-tight solution.

So I have been thinking about using something like that to repair my porch roof. What do you all suggest? Would that rubber stuff be a good solution?

Man I just want to have a BBQ when it rains and drink beer in peace! <g>

Thanks!
 

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If you've been messin with the roof for 20 years it's time to call a roofer to fix it once and for all.

My best advice is when ever you are having roof problems to hire a professional roofer to diagnose and repair the problem. Roofing is dangerous business, and is not as easy as it looks. Your roof protects your entire house and everything in it.

If it were my house, I wouldn't have shingles on it. Usually on a 3/12 pitch we prefer to install a low slope membrane like Modified bitumen. You are probably talking about an EPDM roof when you said "rubber roof with glued seams". EPDM is not common on residential, but that doesn't mean it won't work. Personally I'd tear it all off and install the modified bitumen. Your biggest problem is probably the flashing where the roof meets the wall.

You BBQ inside your porch?
 

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Deck Designer/Builder
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Grump, my guess is, it isn't an enclosed porch...

Heck, I open up the garage door and BBQ at the front of my garage all winter long. That's why I have two BBQ's - a natural gas one on my deck and one with a propane tank for the garage in the winter.
 

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Very cool Decks, cooked on one side and frozen on the other.
 

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Commercial Roofing
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Where are you located? Maybe someone here could come and assist you.
 

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I think that location should be a mandatory field at sign in. How many times do we ask the same question, where are you?
Glass, it only takes a second on MapQuest. I know where he is and I've never been to IL. He's just north of Joliet, halfway between there and Romeoville. Northeast of Crest Hill, SW of Chicago (that toddelin' town).
 

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Commercial Roofing
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HAve you ever seen the port called Chicago? It is HUGE. LOL

A little history lesson might be in order here now.
 

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I was at the Chicago Yacht Club once to pick up an 80 ft. schooner, 9'6" draft. Never ran aground once, lots of water.
 

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TeetorbiltI know where he is and I've never been to IL. [/QUOTE said:
LOL - Hell you don't have to go there you can usually find a satellite image of just about any street address. Nice to know who has a water tank on their block, who lives near the beach, who drinks budweiser, etc., etc. :eek: When I found the image of my house the reolution shocked me. You could see the crushed stone I was putting down for the patio I was building at the time and the van in the driveway. Grumpy could have given me a roofing estimate just from looking at the image.
 

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Pipe, I've used terrafly for years, what are you using?
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
No doubt it is time to call a roofer - but this stubborn old idiot just can't admit defeat. <g>

This porch roof bends into a 12 in 12 pitch roof which has a gable end on one side and a wall on the other side. At one point the flashing to that wall leaked, the water ran down, and it appeared to be the porch roof leaking - but it wasn't. That leaking was corrected by re-shingling the porch and the 12 in 12 above it all the way to the peak. With copper flashing - every course - 12" up the wall. The roof sheathing directly under the flashing was also 'tapered' away from the wall about 18". Then the wall was re-sided to come down over the new copper flashing. That solved the bad flashing issue.

What is "Modified Bitumen"? The stuff that looks like 3-tab shingle material and comes in rolls? Sort of 'grainy' surface?

You are right - "EPDM" is the stuff I was thinking of - I just ran into the roofers (all the way down here from NYC to fix a roof leak into a store!) again yesterday and they told me that it was called EDPM.

This porch roof has a 3' overhang on the low side and about 4' feet on the one pitched side while the other side connects to the 1000 square foot carport. So I keep the new all stainless steel BBQ, that I just got for this last Halloween, under that 4' overhang. But, although the porch is enclosed (which was a stupid move - ruined it for me - but that's a Whole other story <g>) I have sometimes brought the BBQ in in a windy rain (this new one is so big that it's not easy any more) and open all the windows.

Using the the carport is better. <g>

Although the overhang was OK in the last weekend's blizzard. We did pork tenderloins on Sat. and then steaks on Sunday - snowing like a fog the whole time. <g>

How is modified bitumen applied? Is it less expensive than the EDPM ? Or better in some other way?

Thanks!

PHM
 

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Modified bitumen can be applied several ways, and as such each method of appllication uses a slightly different modified bitumen. In my opinion a torch applied modified bitumen is best but I NEVER NEVER suggest anyone use a torch unless they are being supervised but an experienced roofing torchman...

In that case, I suggest the Self Adhesive (SA) modified bitumen AKA Peel and Stick. The SA modified bitumen is nice because it's very easy to install and has been engineered for residential applications. Research Certainteed Flintastic SA www.Certainteed.com I suggest the 3 ply system, with the mid ply. If properly installed you shouldn't have to worry for 20 years.

Modified bitumen is about 4 mm thick, where even the thickest EPDM is only .090. EPDM is basically a bicycle tire inner tube. Modified bitumen is more forgiving than EPDM, meaning EPDM has to be Exactly installed with no errors. Also modified bitumen comes on smaller rolls making it easier to handle. EPDM comes on LARGE rolls, since it is primarily a commercial/industrial grade material. It will take several men to just lift a roll of EPDM.
 

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Yep, you need to get a qualified roofer out to help you.

I prefer modified bitumen on these smaller jobs, as you need fewer tools (brushes, rollers, etc). I also like the skill level required to do modified bitumen nicely. If you want your mod bit roof to last, install a polyiso substrate to absorb movement and flex. I only say polyiso because it does not catch fire as readily as HDWF.

Do not be fooled by the granular surface. 90# roll roofing has a granular surface. Modified bitumen is polymer modified asphalt, designed to be more flexible than steep asphalt. Smooth surfaced modifieds need to be coated to reflect UV. Granulated has the granular surface to accomplish this.

Be sure to get proper perimeter flashings, and make sure they run the field up onto the 12/12 at least 12 inches, and counter this with a base flashing of 16" up and 4" min. onto the flat. Prime and strip in the metal (use steel, as aluminum wrinkles too easliy and doesn't seem to bond well to the cover strip). Youre going to have to disassemble the siding to flash the wall. MAKE SURE YOUR ROOFER HAS INSURANCE! General liabilty enuff to cover your home and all of its contents, should he burn your house down, and Workman's Compensation in case the workers get hurt. Ask for a certificate of insurance and call the agent to confirm it is in force. Other than that, leave it to your roofer. :)

If it is a 3/12, you could IWS this section and shingle it.
 
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