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I dont like running, hard to smoke.

Ha, speed and trim. Those words dont go together with the houses I work on. Everything is old and nothing is plumb.

I would rather take longer and have it as close to perfect as I can versus hurrying up and get the heck out of dodge.

I can go pretty quickly on kitchen installs though.
 

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You'd kill me on the kitchens. Never worked as an installer, just on my own custom stuff (not kitchens). Speed and efficiency always come down to experience and always thinking ahead a couple of steps.

Yeah maybe at 1st but judging from what you are getting done trim wise you would have no problem getting in the swing of knocking out production kitchens .
If you ever need more work i would definetly think about adding that to your list . You already have the skills and the tools give or take a few things . Just a matter of appying that skill a little bit differently .

BTW what do your 2nd trims consist of ? Rails , shoe molding ect ?
Thats how I got into kitchens . A tract builder insisted that be in my 2nd trim . I know today their is a sub for every phase . I even did hardware (wire shelving , doorknobs ect ) for a few though I hated it .
 

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Interesting thread and when I was in my late 20's and early 30's I worked for some new homebuilders.

I would do a duplex in 3 days hand nailing, I used a nail spinner when it was oak. All pre-finished cheapo stuff, including cabinets. L-shaped kitchens with a peninsula.

I bought a compressor and sliding miter box and all the other guys would check it out saying things like, "yeah its fast but hand-nailing is better quality":laughing:

I always had my eyes open for better speed and accuracy.

I respect you production guys, you get my vote for cranking out good work pronto:thumbsup:

And JF, the girls like a guy who shows em a good time, that works at any age.
 

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Discussion Starter · #27 ·
I dont like running, hard to smoke.

Ha, speed and trim. Those words dont go together with the houses I work on. Everything is old and nothing is plumb.

I would rather take longer and have it as close to perfect as I can versus hurrying up and get the heck out of dodge.

I can go pretty quickly on kitchen installs though.

That's why this was about production trim, not much joy in it, but it can be done fast/efficiently and done well. Like I said these were in mini-mcmansions in neighborhoods with 150-200 homes in the 300-400k range (back a few years ago anyway, can probably pick a few foreclosures at much lower prices now, I would guess).

And like I said I did it for 12-18 months, while building my remodeling bus., so it paid the bills...and taught me that I could put it in very high gear when needed....definitely not my cup of tea, but some of it was fun.
 

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Discussion Starter · #28 ·
I dont like running, hard to smoke.

Ha, speed and trim. Those words dont go together with the houses I work on. Everything is old and nothing is plumb.

I would rather take longer and have it as close to perfect as I can versus hurrying up and get the heck out of dodge.

.
...not on production trim, you learn to get fast/efficient if you want to make any money. Not nearly as enjoyable as fine woodworking, but it has its place.
 

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Discussion Starter · #29 ·
Interesting thread and when I was in my late 20's and early 30's I worked for some new homebuilders.

I would do a duplex in 3 days hand nailing, I used a nail spinner when it was oak. All pre-finished cheapo stuff, including cabinets. L-shaped kitchens with a peninsula.

I bought a compressor and sliding miter box and all the other guys would check it out saying things like, "yeah its fast but hand-nailing is better quality":laughing:

I always had my eyes open for better speed and accuracy.

I respect you production guys, you get my vote for cranking out good work pronto:thumbsup:

And JF, the girls like a guy who shows em a good time, that works at any age.

:laughing:

I had a short stint at the productions stuff, it's been 4 years or so. I'm guessing that it won't be coming back anytime soon. I think it's good experience for anyone who does trim work though, as the efficiencies can definitely be carried over to higher-end work as well....you just get to breathe a little easier all day long. ;)
 

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Discussion Starter · #30 ·
Yeah maybe at 1st but judging from what you are getting done trim wise you would have no problem getting in the swing of knocking out production kitchens .
If you ever need more work i would definetly think about adding that to your list . You already have the skills and the tools give or take a few things . Just a matter of appying that skill a little bit differently .

BTW what do your 2nd trims consist of ? Rails , shoe molding ect ?
Thats how I got into kitchens . A tract builder insisted that be in my 2nd trim . I know today their is a sub for every phase . I even did hardware (wire shelving , doorknobs ect ) for a few though I hated it .
There was a 2 man team running all the stair installs...and they were about 10 times faster doing stairs then I could ever hope to be, unless I got the chance to do stairs for a year or two straight. These guys were good...and fast. All comes down to experience and efficiency.

We'd come back for punch-out (shoe-mould on 1st floor, all hardwoods,tile) hanging towel bars, tissue holders etc....the really fun stuff...NOT. :no:
 

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Discussion Starter · #31 ·
So am I just a superduperextraspecial carpenter? Doing humanly impossible production carpentry tasks....they have me wondering. Maybe I am special, just like my parents always told me? :laughing:



You sound like a hustler but how old are you and can you sustain that pace . I'm 41 and I just can't work like that anymore .
sorry, missed that part. I'm 42 now, this was 4 years ago or so, and only for 12-18 months as some filler work. We'd only do 1-2 houses a week.

I agree it could wear you out after a short number of years.

But hell, I was (and am) fat...I just like to work efficiently and like the challenge of how to work most efficiently...it was the only thing that made the production work any fun, trying to figure out how best to accomplish the work in the shortest amount of time....I get bored pretty easily.:laughing:
 

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Discussion Starter · #32 ·
Also saw the kapex in your picture and a DeWalt on the ground. The dewalt looks like the model 706 ( 1st version of the belt driven ) I have had since 2001 and still going strong . Do you take the Kapex on the job ?
Yeah, the kapex goes out on site with ct33 vac, but this is for remodeling clients...the production trim was a few years back.

The dewalt is still running strong, I think it's about 6-7 years old. The kapex was mostly for dust collection capabilities, which it really excels at, plus it's a hell of a saw (which it well should be).
 

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I don't think I could do a room in 15 minutes. The coping alone would take 2-3 minutes per pc. At least with the crown I make. Solid wood and a lot thicker than lumber yard pine crown. With 2 guys, mostly to hold the wild end, I could do it in a half hour. I could do it by myself in about 3/4 hour, but it is a pain.
 

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Discussion Starter · #36 ·
It was a little like slave labor, but I'm glad I got the opportunity to do it for awhile, it opened my eyes.

And man, you are ON a schedule with this stuff...3 days start to finish (and the 3 days are when the builder says)...painters are all over the place the next a.m....if they haven't tried to sneak in on the 3rd day of trimming...:mad:
 

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Discussion Starter · #37 ·
...and there were only a couple of rooms in each house that I would do totally by myself. The majority of the house was measured and cut by my guy.

I would do the pediments and a couple of the simple rooms of crown, while he was getting me set up for installation...rock and roll baby :laughing:

ah, the good ole days...ok not that old
 

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production work gets old quick. I did it for 7 yrs straight day in day out.
same **** everyday, over and over.
like Jay, our crew made it more interesting by seeing what we could do in a short amount of time without sacrificing quality.
Boss would tell us monday how many houses we had for the week and offer a bonus if it was done.
game on after that,
alot times we were out of work for a day or two cause we got done to soon, but he made sure the bonus made up for it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #39 ·
And I was just taking overflow work for the builders main trim company that subbed the overflow to me...so he's taking 20% off the top of what the builder was paying...for production work :shutup: ...you better learn to move quick very quickly to make anything on that set-up :laughing:.

This guy was probably like your boss Mike, he had a couple of 3-man crews, one that he worked on and they knocked out the homes in one long day, 12-13 hours...so they would do 4-5 houses a week in 4 different subdivisions at that time.

He was a good guy to work with though, never once had any money problem. I would average $35-$40 hr. which helped pay the bills. Not enough to run a business on, but for work handed to me as fill-in work, can't complain at all. :no:
 

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As a former fast and clean trim guy I don't think its unusual to be twice as fast as average. But who wants to be average.
But the things that make it hard to be consistent are the same today as yesterday.
Sloppy framing, taping ect can turn a 30 minute crown into 45 minutes easy, and what about when you get to a job and the GC got a deal on 8' pieces, so you got joints all over the place.
I'm not as fast as I used to be, but I recently did 156 LF that included returns, angled partitions and a box bay. Lots of coping.
Pre primed crown, 2 coats of paint, cut in the yard.
All done including nail holes filled and painted in one day and got paid.

For me thats a killer day.
For ME toooo:thumbup:
 
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