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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
When building either a butcher block counter top or an inlay or something similar how do you guys get your joints perfect?

I usually cut a single long piece of stock with my tracksaw, then sneak up on the edge with my 12" table disc. And assemble with the domino. I don't own a ribbon sander and this is how I was taught... Is there a quicker way to make the joint nearly invisible?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
jointer. That is what they were designed for.
I know, guess I should have said I don't have a jointer either. I'm too small to own a lot of big stuff, don't wish to get bigger either.
 

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In the old days before I got a jointer I used a router with straight bit in a table with a split fence.Same principal as a jointer and most people have a router.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
In the old days before I got a jointer I used a router with straight bit in a table with a split fence.Same principal as a jointer and most people have a router.
Got 3. I don't have confidence that the motor and/or bit will have much fun with Ipe, tigerwood, garapa. I thought about it with my new table but decided against it. I'll give it a shot on the next one with the old Hitachi.

The way I do it works but just a bit slow, the track saw is almost good enough on its own. I also like the sander because the oily woods and the abrasion left for the epoxy to stick to. Just thought there might be a trick I never learned.
 

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A good saw should be all you need. Cabinet saw that is. I doubt a portable saw will give you that clean of a line. A real contractors saw might do it with the right blade.

A jointer and planer is the best way to do it.
 

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I know, guess I should have said I don't have a jointer either. I'm too small to own a lot of big stuff, don't wish to get bigger either.
You can wish all you want but unless you have the desire,knowledge and ambition to get all the correct tools needed to do the job professional and provide a professional product getting bigger is not going to happen anyway. The high dollar woods you mentioned arent the easiest to work with either so subbing it out might be a good route for you. On the other hand if you just want to compete with I built in my garage crowd well then I'm sure the tools you have should work just fine.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 · (Edited)
You can wish all you want but unless you have the desire,knowledge and ambition to get all the correct tools needed to do the job professional and provide a professional product getting bigger is not going to happen anyway. The high dollar woods you mentioned arent the easiest to work with either so subbing it out might be a good route for you. On the other hand if you just want to compete with I built in my garage crowd well then I'm sure the tools you have should work just fine.
Oh okay maybe I could have you come down and teach me how to work ipe... Teach me oh wise one. You take a peak at some of my work and repeat that statement. I'm definitely not the best carpenter here but I am quite competent about what you call "high dollar wood".

And to think stupid ole me always thought high dollar was more than $8 per bd ft. Haven't done much out of macassar ebony or ziricote have you?
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
A good saw should be all you need. Cabinet saw that is. I doubt a portable saw will give you that clean of a line. A real contractors saw might do it with the right blade.

A jointer and planer is the best way to do it.
I wouldn't dare make the attempt with a portable tables saw. I was using a ts75. It works for a lot of the domestics fine, not so much on the exotics, okay but not quite flawless. Never ran ipe through a jointer, seems to me it may scallop a little, no? Surface planers get tore up, or tear up.

Sidebar: wheres Darcy been Leo? I'm sure he's run some south American hw through a jointer. If it looks advantageous enough id get a jointer, I just don't want to spend the money if I'm only going to use it once every 3 months.
 

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Jointers are made for the purpose of jointing wood.I owned a custom furniture shop for 12 years or so and ran a lot of exotics.The only way they scallop the wood is poor setup or operator wood.They will tear out on some figured wood because the grain changes but not because they are exotics.
 

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I wouldn't dare make the attempt with a portable tables saw. I was using a ts75. It works for a lot of the domestics fine, not so much on the exotics, okay but not quite flawless. Never ran ipe through a jointer, seems to me it may scallop a little, no? Surface planers get tore up, or tear up.

Sidebar: wheres Darcy been Leo? I'm sure he's run some south American hw through a jointer. If it looks advantageous enough id get a jointer, I just don't want to spend the money if I'm only going to use it once every 3 months.
Darcy's pissed at all of us.

My planer has carbide knives, not the jointer though.
 

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Ipe or very hard materials, just go slow and steady with the jionter. I use the jionter to finish the glue side for solid surface drop edges. Then a quick light sanding> 2-3 passes to remove any mill marks. Use a small piece of solid surface with sandpaper glued to it. Ensures the 'sanding' will be flat/true surface.

Suppose it would be possible to glue sand paper to a block of particle board or MDF to finish sand your butcher block pieces. In place of the 'mechanical' sander. Just have to make sure the block doesn't wobble and consistently remove material.

I had a small 6" jionter, purchased from Menards in 1984. Can make crap table saw cuts glue up ready and all sorts of other good things. $200.00 back then and really didn't need a cabinet saw for many years after.

Tho I do prefer cabinet saw, jointer, thickness planer for glue ups...
 

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Artist and not a curator
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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Ipe is very hard on all equipment, I can't imagine why you would attempt to make a slab out of it. For most other hardwoods the track-saw you have, a Stanley #8 and a planer is all you need to make a large slab.

This slab is 3' wide x 12' long.
Its actually not as bad as garapa is on bits and blades. The reason is because on the decks I do people have artwork on the walls and want some kind of plaque to hang it on and now everyone wants the background of the art to match their deck. Not my idea but it sells at the end of each deck and is a good filler job.

Why's Darcy pissed? I thought you guys were good? I miss reading his pissed off, no nonsense replies.
 

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I've got a jointer and a planer with carbide blades and based on the cost of the knives I would never run Ipe through it. I have run it though the jointer and planer with HHS knives and it dulls them very fast. In addition Ipe does not generally come fully kiln dried so that is another reason I wouldn't want to build a slab with it.
 

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Well carbide blades sure are cheaper than diamond coated blades.......
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
I've got a jointer and a planer with carbide blades and based on the cost of the knives I would never run Ipe through it. I have run it though the jointer and planer with HHS knives and it dulls them very fast. In addition Ipe does not generally come fully kiln dried so that is another reason I wouldn't want to build a slab with it.
There's a couple places you can get ipe less than 8% mc. I don't think its possible to get it any less just because of the oils in it. This isn't the first slab I've ever built out of ipe and I fully understand the reservation... I failed many times but now I have some with over five years and still looking brand new, it took a lot of research and even more trial and error.

As far as blades, yeah it beats the snot out of them, every job gets a new blade (more like sharpened) I charge accordingly but would residual cost of jointer blades cost as much as time that I'm taking to do it?
 

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Artist and not a curator
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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Ipe or very hard materials, just go slow and steady with the jionter. I use the jionter to finish the glue side for solid surface drop edges. Then a quick light sanding> 2-3 passes to remove any mill marks. Use a small piece of solid surface with sandpaper glued to it. Ensures the 'sanding' will be flat/true surface.

Suppose it would be possible to glue sand paper to a block of particle board or MDF to finish sand your butcher block pieces. In place of the 'mechanical' sander. Just have to make sure the block doesn't wobble and consistently remove material.

I had a small 6" jionter, purchased from Menards in 1984. Can make crap table saw cuts glue up ready and all sorts of other good things. $200.00 back then and really didn't need a cabinet saw for many years after.

Tho I do prefer cabinet saw, jointer, thickness planer for glue ups...
I trust the beard!

And Leo
 

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I was trying to come up with a solution based on what you own. For me anything 10' or less we run through the sliding table saw, planer and straight to glue-up. But if what you have is a track-saw then using a track saw and portable planer would get you by. Personally given that it is for artwork many feet from the deck you want to match I would choose something close in color and stain to match. Ipe goes gray without finish, so I guess it would depend on the finish.
 

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