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Discussion Starter #1
I am setting up an appliance package on new residential construction - I know I need a 220V when having a double oven, I am also setting up a trivection double oven and I am not sure if it would need a 220V on dedicated circuit.
So I guess my question is, on anything how would I know if something needs to go on a dedicated circuit?? :eek:
 

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The easiest way of knowing that is to review the manufacturers electrical requirements. Doing anything is irresponsible
 

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There are ways to feed more than one cooking appliance from a single larger circuit. General feelings are this is NOT a DIY project though. Typically it is easier and even cheaper to just run a dedicated circuit to each appliance.

The main thing is to know the amperage or KW of each.

Nothing can be done until you know these stats. 220 means very little, this is only the voltage, you need to know the draw. In fact it is not even 220 for a range/oven/stove. It would be 120/240 which is two hots, neutral and ground.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
That's the thing... I did read the manufacturers requirements but it talks about kw and amprages - in my line of work all I know is 110V, 220V, 220V on dedicated, etc....

I have tried and tried to find the easiest way to understand kw and amprages when it comes to electrical. I have even contacted some of my electricians to see if there was some easier way of learning it and they all say the same thing - and that is you have to work in it to really understand it... Too bad there is not an book called Electrical for Dummies....:eek:

But Thank You Very Much for your input... I think I might put it on a dedicated circuit just to be safe.....
 

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If you know 120,220, etc., you SHOULD know KW, amps, watts etc.. One is useless without the other.
OK, you know 220, but what size wire do you install. This is directly related amps and to volts in realtion to KW or watts.

Are you familiar with Ohm's Law? This is the basis of all things electrical.

Watts divided by volts gives us the amps.
KW = kilowatts (1000 watts)
6.5kw = 6500 watts
6500 watts @ 240 volts = 27.08 amps. This would require a 40 amp circuit.


I honestly think you should at least have a handle on this before you do any electrical work. Don't just throw a wire in hoping it is the correct size.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I appreciate the warnings of electrical and I would never do something without knowing the right answer - that is why I am here... Like I said, I am no electrician but have been seeking knowledge on the trade to better understand what I need to do. Thanks....
 

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best thing to do is ask the man/women who would know your electrician since he/she will be the one installing it . one phone call to the person that can do the calculations quickly and correctly will save you hours or dollars later.
 

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dear lady, if you are ever in doubt, always keep your circuits seperate to avoid over
loading. please read your mfgs label for correct amperage and consult your electrician
for proper wire size. good luck! bigboy11
 
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