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Home Repairs
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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
The owner I am doing this job for initially wanted this trim installed the way it is now in the picture. He now wants me to add cross diagonal pieces from corner to corner inside each square to form a X pattern. He wants the board center of the diagonals to join at each corner which will require 2 cuts. I'm not sure how to go about getting the angles. I was wondering if there is a technique you guys/ladies use to get them. This would be a piece of cake if each segment were square..... just measure the length of each diagnal and make two 45 degree cuts on each end. But they are slightly rectangular so each cut will be different..

http://i894.photobucket.com/albums/ac141/John_Lannon/2014-02-07_13-22-30_279_zps33196785.jpg

V/R.....John
 

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Measure the diagonal and two sides. Hypotenuse is 90 degrees, so solve for the opposite and adjacent angles and you are done.
 

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You need to work off the centerline of the board.

Attached is an illustration similar to what you have. In this case the height is 42" and width is 30". The leg has a pitch of 54.46 on one face and the complement, 35.54 on the other. This was found using a construction calculator, enter 42 for the rise and 30 for the run. The board is cut at 51 5/8" and the angles cut to the centerline.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thank you so much guys. I went out into my shop a little while ago and made a mock up with a pin nailer and some scrap. I got this!

Exlud: I have not heard the term Hypotenuse since my high school days and working with the 3-4-5. But we had to know how to use it before we could get out of the classroom into the shop in my building trades class. 1974 was a long time ago. :blink: I am glad you brought it up because it just validated how rusty my math skills are. I am up very early every morning and plan on doing some online refresher courses while I am waiting on the sun.

Keith: I have the Projectcalc model 8525 and it is more for basic estimating. I used it back when I was working as a drywall and paint estimator. Do you think the Construction Master 4065 would be a good choice?

m1911: Dunno why I didn't think of that right away. So simple

Thanks again guys!

V/R.....John
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
It doesn't have to say Festool on it.
I saw a trim guy carrying one of these one day. I wasn't really paying attention to him but I was briefly curious as to what it was. I googled it this morning. Festool 494370 Kapex Miter Saw Miterfast Angle Transfer Device. Do you lay it on your stock and swivel the blade to the device? Seems like a cool tool to own if it speeds up your work. I can't find a tutorial on it.
 

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I have not heard the term Hypotenuse since my high school days and working with the 3-4-5. But we had to know how to use it before we could get out of the classroom into the shop in my building trades class. 1974 was a long time ago. :blink: I am glad you brought it up because it just validated how rusty my math skills are. I am up very early every morning and plan on doing some online refresher courses while I am waiting on the sun.
The light bulb went on for me years ago when someone was explaining something (I don't remember what) to me and said "it's pretty much all triangles." I revisited everything Sister Catherine taught me it Trig, and sure enough...
 

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hey Deps, if you have a smartphone then just download the Build Calc APP:thumbsup: it costs around $20.00 and you'll never have to go looking for it (unless you lose your phone:laughing:) and since you're rusty it has built in tutorials, you can view samples on youtube to see what i'm talkin about
 

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I used to frame & o. t. a lot of English Tudor style homes. All we did was tack the boards centered on the corner, & straight edge a line onto the finish board. You can obviously do all the calcs, but it don't get any easier than this way.
Joe
 

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On rectangles, I do not run the center of the brace into the corner (the dashed line). I offset it so the bearing surface on both sides of the corner are equal. Laying this out, the construction calculator is not too helpful.

I make a series of pencil marks every 1/16" on each side of the corner and at the opposite corner. Move the brace until the edges of the brace are equal distances from the corner. I mark them and draw my cut lines for the brace.

If this were a real brace, I pay attention to the forces involved and if one side of the corner is subjected to a larger load, I may adjust how the brace is run so the side of the corner with the larger load gets more bearing.

For serious loads, I let in the brace, with the seat cut bisecting the angle of the brace.

Here is a sketch of how I run braces for equal bearing surfaces :
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Thank you for all the suggestions guys. The little project went off without a hitch. I knew I squared off all the bordering really well, so I could trust just going by the numbers. I bought a Construction Master Model# 4050 calculator. I put in the rise and run and trusted the calculator to get the diagonal length and pitch angle. All the cuts were spot on. I know this is basic stuff for experienced trimmers, but it was a lot of fun for me. :)

Here are a couple pics.
http://i894.photobucket.com/albums/ac141/John_Lannon/2014-02-07_13-22-30_279_zps33196785.jpg
http://i894.photobucket.com/albums/ac141/John_Lannon/2014-02-08_16-25-53_128_zpsf7c09af7.jpg
 
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