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Hey guys, I been lurking around this website for a bit, I love browsing all the different sections and learning....

I'm 19 years old from California, I have been working for a company ever since I was in middle school, working on summers to make a little cash, and after I graduated school, I have been working almost full time - whenever work was available. We mostly did residential and commercial remodeling, so I have had experience from demo'ing - finishing the remodel, but also had experience in most of the trades, such as framing, and whatever else came up. Every day we did something different, so I learned a lot, although I do have a lot to learn.

The company I worked for slowed down a lot, I'm still living at home with my parents, so it's not like I have major bills to be paid, but I need to find a steady job. I am not picky about which trade, just something that pays descent. I gained a lot of trust from my boss because I never cheat or lie, I am always honest, he trusted me with anything, and you guys probably won't beleive this, but I didn't even have to give him a time card, he trusted my word. Although I gave one anyways just to be organized.

I never went job hunting, so I started out on craigslist, I was pretty disapointed with the payscale of $10.00 - $12.00 ???? So now I am just confused, what would be the average pay for an apprentice? I need your guys advice on where I should start? How should I find a job? If a company is looking to hire an apprentice, would I qualify for one? Do I need some kind of classes or need to be enrolled in school for that? If you guys can explain that a little more to me, I would be very happy!

I am a hard worker, I know I have a lot to learn, and I really want to learn. Where should I start? Or just give a few pointers if you can.

Thanks, hope I don't come off as a begger or anything for my first post, just wanted to ask from a professionals point of view on this career path :).
 

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Super Moderator
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11,965 Posts
Welcome to CT.

When you are just starting out, you need to specialize and get really good at one thing. You must be leaning towards a particular trade.

Pick it, stay with it, and in about 10+ years you might be ready to diversify a little.

What trade interests you the most?
 

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Al Smith
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2,392 Posts
you would be better off just showing up on active jobsites before 8 am and just asking for work. show up three days in a row if you have to. Maybe even help the guy get set up. and when they see you are serious. they will probably hire you. Dont waste your time on Craig's list looking for work. those are the bottom feeders who will use and abuse and then dispose of you.
 

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Banned
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538 Posts
you would be better off just showing up on active jobsites before 8 am and just asking for work. show up three days in a row if you have to. Maybe even help the guy get set up. and when they see you are serious. they will probably hire you. Dont waste your time on Craig's list looking for work. those are the bottom feeders who will use and abuse and then dispose of you.
i just got a pretty sweet job on craigslist but it's not construction, so dont totally bash the site!

i've found work with builders on craigslist, but it panned out exactly how A W just said. i learned this lesson the hard way. take his advice and mine. dont find a job with a builder on craigslist. think of it like this, if a builder has to post an ad on craigslist to find an employee, something isnt right. it means he's probably gone threw every single person he knows thats a friend or family member and they want nothing to do with him, or he's just too lazy to ask around. either way, its bad for you.
 

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General Contractor
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3,444 Posts
Double Post
 

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General Contractor
Joined
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3,444 Posts
I didn't write this... though I wish I had.........
Ever wonder how some people seem to flow right into the job they want and then they seamlessly flow right into the raises and praises of the boss? Well here is one employer’s inside view.

How to get hired in construction


Things You'll Need:
· An Open Mind
· Willingness to trade in your bad habits for good work ethics.
· Willing get up early and be there when the boss needs you.

Step 1
Examine the potential employers... It’s not just, "Who is hiring?" Or "What kind of benefits plan do they have?"

You need to understand employers are human beings with real needs also... and one of their biggest needs is dependable labor at an affordable rate.

Understand the dilemma:

The first obstacle of the employer is "employees that want to make more money than the foreman and work less than they did on the last Job they worked... which probably wasn’t much."

The average new hire employee today is interested in 1) Paycheck 2) figuring out how to get someone else to do the work and 3) wanting draws on a paycheck they haven’t earned yet.

Sober up a moment and look at the job market from the eyes of an employer who 1) is on a tight budget, 2) already has "dead wood" employees that need to be pruned out" and 3) Is trying to figure out how to get the job done and just maybe... make enough money to afford some of the newer equipment he needs before the older equipment breaks down for the last time...

Step 2
Think in terms of "Getting Started". You want a stepping stone... You want to get your feet wet in the industry and prove that you can do the job.. The best employers don’t want to waste time and money training someone who won’t be there in a month…

Lets face it... construction is hard work and many would-be carpenters don’t last the first week. So if you want to get started in this industry, use the lesser company to get you trained, and at the same time, prove to yourself that you not only can do the job… but really want to work in that field.

Don’t worry if the entry position is in a company that has little future... It has great future if it gives you A) The Experience, B) A Great Reference!!! C) The Confidence that only comes when one has worked the job, understands the requirements and has a sincere desire to continue in that field.

Step 3
Look for a trend when the boss is typically looking to replace someone...

Go to the construction site: The early morning after a mid week holiday... Half the crew shows up for work either Drunk, Drugged or they just don't show up for work at all... The foreman is ready to fire the entire crew except that he needs to get the job done... and then somebody CLEAN and SOBER shows up, for the third or fourth morning in a row, wanting work... Yes I said Early Morning and Yes I said it was not the first time you were there looking for work but the third or fourth morning in a row...

What is considered early? Find out what time the boss gets to the job site and find out what time the crew is suppose to clock in. Be there just after the boss arrives and before the crew shows up. Have the related safety equipment with you or better yet... ON YOU!

Drink a cup of coffee and greet the boss with "Mornin’ Sir" or "Mornin’ Mam" "Need a worker today?"

Have a list of job sites and the foreman’s names who you have talked to, and work the list. Be there. If someone doesn’t need you this morning make sure he has your cell number... Give him your card and say "Sir, here is my number... In case you end up short handed".

Thank him/her and then go to the next job site. Work your list.

Step 4
ON Call Labor companies... like Labor Ready and Labor Finders etc. will also get your foot in the door....

I have worked for several of them in the past... Yes I said I have worked for them... and I have also called them for crew as well... and as a skilled laborer who really wanted to work I didn’t last long... I don’t mean that in a bad way... But rather... that a skilled worker who shows his metal will be put on full time as fast as they can arrange it.

In one case I literally heard the comment from my crew chief to his boss... "What in the H--- is that guy doing working for Labor -----???" "He could be making $__.__ per hour over at our competitors..." "You need to get him signed on before he goes over the hill on ya". They then worked me till the end of the week to fulfill their agreement with "Labor ----" and hired me officially on the end of the last day working for "Labor -----" as a Monday new hire.

Are you a good worker??? With a good work ethic and worth your salt??? Don’t be afraid to sit the bench at a few hiring halls... not only will it get you some spare cash for basic needs while you’re waiting on the big job.. But you will also learn a lot from what goes on all around you.
Just stay out of all the trouble you will see... Keep your nose clean.

Step 5
Getting a foot in the door:

Once upon a time... there was a construction company owner out building a fence by himself. He had some people that called themselves crew... but never showed up on time and when they did were often as not drunk or hung over..
.
On this particular day they hadn't shown up and he had 2 or three more fences already lined up but the fence he was working on was for a "Preferred Customer" who had already ordered several other fences from him... She owned a bunch of rentals... and It had to be done, asap, because the lady who lived there had dogs...

The owner of the company was out in a yard digging fence post holes in the hot sun with no help in sight. Well almost... There was a neighbor who had a brother living with him... the brother had just moved into town and had not had time to look for work much yet... He was out in the yard watching, and sized up the situation pretty accurately...

Where is your crew? He said...
Home drinking beer I reckon...
I stopped for an Ice Cold Green tea about then and he came up to talk...

You examine what he said next and think about it!!!

"I’ll make you a deal" he said. "I’ll work for you the rest of the day and tomorrow at $8.00 an hour, and if you think I'm worth more than that... you just pay me what you think I’m worth.
If I'm worth keeping, we’ll talk about my pay rate... if not... you'll be pretty much done with this fence, and we can part ways... Fair Enough?”

Step 6
I needed a good laborer but didn’t figure I could afford one. The guys I had been working were paid 8.00 an hour but mostly weren’t worth $2.00 an hour. The were sloppy, careless, lazy and always acting like I owed them something... oh... and always wanting a raise...
I looked him over... he had confidence... and the offer was pretty straight... He almost had to be better than the Bozos I had been using... so I agreed and gave him a try.

I lined out some work and made sure he had what he needed... marked in my mind where he was and where he should be when I got back... (Your boss knows how long it takes to do what he has given you.)

When I got back he was about 40% further along than I expected...
WOW>>> Ok... ok... anybody can do that on a first day just to get the big money and then start slacking off...
But he didn’t. Several months later when he left my employ I had been paying him $14.00 per hour and trying to figure out if I could give him another raise!!! He made me money... and He made me look good in the process!!!

He was doing what he was there for.... Making Me Money... That is what YOU as an employee are for... To make your Boss Money!!!

If you aren’t doing that... you are liability instead of an asset.

Step 7
Employers don’t want continual excuses... They want immediate results... They want on-time, every-time, performance from their employees that they can count on to be there doing the job even when the boss is not around.

Later on I had to get him some helpers, and again I left him with the equipment and supplies and went to work another job... Coming back later to pick up some tools and drop off some lumber, I found him hard at work, and two jokers taking a break on my customer’s patio furniture.

Any guesses as to who I retained and who I let go a week later when the work got lean? You guessed it. Adios Machos!

Be there when the boss expects you. Be there to work. Do your job and be conscientious of the fact that you are an employee and someone is paying good money for your time.

Promise your future boss your best efforts on the job and then live up to it.

That employee had a phrase I liked... If I needed him to work late... or if something had to be done a certain way... He didn’t give me a lot of guff, excuses or advice on what he thought was a better way...
He Just said "You want it... You got it" and he went to work.

Last seen he was working for a nationally renowned construction company that had a branch in our neck of the woods... They stole him fair and square with a raise and benefits... even offered him a "free room in the company held workers house" if he needed it...
Remember how he started?

Observant of someone needing a crew on a day the crew stayed home... It could just as easily be you... Look at the up side of the situation and do your best.
Make your boss money and make him look good in the process.

If you want to change companies... fine, do so, but keep the job you have until you are ready to make your move. Then be sure to give your boss as much notice as you can.

Wish you well...
Hope this helps
MrMaranatha


Tips & Warnings
  • Have the required safety gear with or on you
  • Get your foot in the door by:
  • A) Being there on time and in time... even/especially before you are hired
  • B) Be someone your boss can count on.
  • C) Be ready and available when he needs you.... Keep showing up... shows you interested and sincere.
  • D) Take a pay cut to get in the door if you need to... Ask what he is currently paying... Under cut them for a chance to show him what you’ve got!
  • E) Be Worth Keeping... Remember you are there to "MAKE HIM MONEY" not "Make His Money"
  • F) Get your priorities right... put your bosses interest first and you will go far.
  • Do not enter a hard hat zone or restricted area without the required equipment... that will get you thrown off site with a permanent NO HIRE flag in the foreman’s mind.
  • Don’t lie about what tools you know how to use. Power tools may look simple but their safety is not. A simple mistake is a Big Problem when you drop the skill saw on its own cord or go through a board and cut your knee in half...
 
  • Like
Reactions: TulsaRemodeler

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Banned
Joined
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154 Posts
I didn't write this... though I wish I had.........
Ever wonder how some people seem to flow right into the job they want and then they seamlessly flow right into the raises and praises of the boss? Well here is one employer’s inside view.

How to get hired in construction


Things You'll Need:
· An Open Mind
· Willingness to trade in your bad habits for good work ethics.
· Willing get up early and be there when the boss needs you.

Step 1
Examine the potential employers... It’s not just, "Who is hiring?" Or "What kind of benefits plan do they have?"

You need to understand employers are human beings with real needs also... and one of their biggest needs is dependable labor at an affordable rate.

Understand the dilemma:

The first obstacle of the employer is "employees that want to make more money than the foreman and work less than they did on the last Job they worked... which probably wasn’t much."

The average new hire employee today is interested in 1) Paycheck 2) figuring out how to get someone else to do the work and 3) wanting draws on a paycheck they haven’t earned yet.

Sober up a moment and look at the job market from the eyes of an employer who 1) is on a tight budget, 2) already has "dead wood" employees that need to be pruned out" and 3) Is trying to figure out how to get the job done and just maybe... make enough money to afford some of the newer equipment he needs before the older equipment breaks down for the last time...

Step 2
Think in terms of "Getting Started". You want a stepping stone... You want to get your feet wet in the industry and prove that you can do the job.. The best employers don’t want to waste time and money training someone who won’t be there in a month…

Lets face it... construction is hard work and many would-be carpenters don’t last the first week. So if you want to get started in this industry, use the lesser company to get you trained, and at the same time, prove to yourself that you not only can do the job… but really want to work in that field.

Don’t worry if the entry position is in a company that has little future... It has great future if it gives you A) The Experience, B) A Great Reference!!! C) The Confidence that only comes when one has worked the job, understands the requirements and has a sincere desire to continue in that field.

Step 3
Look for a trend when the boss is typically looking to replace someone...

Go to the construction site: The early morning after a mid week holiday... Half the crew shows up for work either Drunk, Drugged or they just don't show up for work at all... The foreman is ready to fire the entire crew except that he needs to get the job done... and then somebody CLEAN and SOBER shows up, for the third or fourth morning in a row, wanting work... Yes I said Early Morning and Yes I said it was not the first time you were there looking for work but the third or fourth morning in a row...

What is considered early? Find out what time the boss gets to the job site and find out what time the crew is suppose to clock in. Be there just after the boss arrives and before the crew shows up. Have the related safety equipment with you or better yet... ON YOU!

Drink a cup of coffee and greet the boss with "Mornin’ Sir" or "Mornin’ Mam" "Need a worker today?"

Have a list of job sites and the foreman’s names who you have talked to, and work the list. Be there. If someone doesn’t need you this morning make sure he has your cell number... Give him your card and say "Sir, here is my number... In case you end up short handed".

Thank him/her and then go to the next job site. Work your list.

Step 4
ON Call Labor companies... like Labor Ready and Labor Finders etc. will also get your foot in the door....

I have worked for several of them in the past... Yes I said I have worked for them... and I have also called them for crew as well... and as a skilled laborer who really wanted to work I didn’t last long... I don’t mean that in a bad way... But rather... that a skilled worker who shows his metal will be put on full time as fast as they can arrange it.

In one case I literally heard the comment from my crew chief to his boss... "What in the H--- is that guy doing working for Labor -----???" "He could be making $__.__ per hour over at our competitors..." "You need to get him signed on before he goes over the hill on ya". They then worked me till the end of the week to fulfill their agreement with "Labor ----" and hired me officially on the end of the last day working for "Labor -----" as a Monday new hire.

Are you a good worker??? With a good work ethic and worth your salt??? Don’t be afraid to sit the bench at a few hiring halls... not only will it get you some spare cash for basic needs while you’re waiting on the big job.. But you will also learn a lot from what goes on all around you.
Just stay out of all the trouble you will see... Keep your nose clean.

Step 5
Getting a foot in the door:

Once upon a time... there was a construction company owner out building a fence by himself. He had some people that called themselves crew... but never showed up on time and when they did were often as not drunk or hung over..
.
On this particular day they hadn't shown up and he had 2 or three more fences already lined up but the fence he was working on was for a "Preferred Customer" who had already ordered several other fences from him... She owned a bunch of rentals... and It had to be done, asap, because the lady who lived there had dogs...

The owner of the company was out in a yard digging fence post holes in the hot sun with no help in sight. Well almost... There was a neighbor who had a brother living with him... the brother had just moved into town and had not had time to look for work much yet... He was out in the yard watching, and sized up the situation pretty accurately...

Where is your crew? He said...
Home drinking beer I reckon...
I stopped for an Ice Cold Green tea about then and he came up to talk...

You examine what he said next and think about it!!!

"I’ll make you a deal" he said. "I’ll work for you the rest of the day and tomorrow at $8.00 an hour, and if you think I'm worth more than that... you just pay me what you think I’m worth.
If I'm worth keeping, we’ll talk about my pay rate... if not... you'll be pretty much done with this fence, and we can part ways... Fair Enough?”

Step 6
I needed a good laborer but didn’t figure I could afford one. The guys I had been working were paid 8.00 an hour but mostly weren’t worth $2.00 an hour. The were sloppy, careless, lazy and always acting like I owed them something... oh... and always wanting a raise...
I looked him over... he had confidence... and the offer was pretty straight... He almost had to be better than the Bozos I had been using... so I agreed and gave him a try.

I lined out some work and made sure he had what he needed... marked in my mind where he was and where he should be when I got back... (Your boss knows how long it takes to do what he has given you.)

When I got back he was about 40% further along than I expected...
WOW>>> Ok... ok... anybody can do that on a first day just to get the big money and then start slacking off...
But he didn’t. Several months later when he left my employ I had been paying him $14.00 per hour and trying to figure out if I could give him another raise!!! He made me money... and He made me look good in the process!!!

He was doing what he was there for.... Making Me Money... That is what YOU as an employee are for... To make your Boss Money!!!

If you aren’t doing that... you are liability instead of an asset.

Step 7
Employers don’t want continual excuses... They want immediate results... They want on-time, every-time, performance from their employees that they can count on to be there doing the job even when the boss is not around.

Later on I had to get him some helpers, and again I left him with the equipment and supplies and went to work another job... Coming back later to pick up some tools and drop off some lumber, I found him hard at work, and two jokers taking a break on my customer’s patio furniture.

Any guesses as to who I retained and who I let go a week later when the work got lean? You guessed it. Adios Machos!

Be there when the boss expects you. Be there to work. Do your job and be conscientious of the fact that you are an employee and someone is paying good money for your time.

Promise your future boss your best efforts on the job and then live up to it.

That employee had a phrase I liked... If I needed him to work late... or if something had to be done a certain way... He didn’t give me a lot of guff, excuses or advice on what he thought was a better way...
He Just said "You want it... You got it" and he went to work.

Last seen he was working for a nationally renowned construction company that had a branch in our neck of the woods... They stole him fair and square with a raise and benefits... even offered him a "free room in the company held workers house" if he needed it...
Remember how he started?

Observant of someone needing a crew on a day the crew stayed home... It could just as easily be you... Look at the up side of the situation and do your best.
Make your boss money and make him look good in the process.

If you want to change companies... fine, do so, but keep the job you have until you are ready to make your move. Then be sure to give your boss as much notice as you can.

Wish you well...
Hope this helps
MrMaranatha



Tips & Warnings
  • Have the required safety gear with or on you
  • Get your foot in the door by:
  • A) Being there on time and in time... even/especially before you are hired
  • B) Be someone your boss can count on.
  • C) Be ready and available when he needs you.... Keep showing up... shows you interested and sincere.
  • D) Take a pay cut to get in the door if you need to... Ask what he is currently paying... Under cut them for a chance to show him what you’ve got!
  • E) Be Worth Keeping... Remember you are there to "MAKE HIM MONEY" not "Make His Money"
  • F) Get your priorities right... put your bosses interest first and you will go far.
  • Do not enter a hard hat zone or restricted area without the required equipment... that will get you thrown off site with a permanent NO HIRE flag in the foreman’s mind.
  • Don’t lie about what tools you know how to use. Power tools may look simple but their safety is not. A simple mistake is a Big Problem when you drop the skill saw on its own cord or go through a board and cut your knee in half...
I am so glad I'm 45, well done on this post.
 

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Maker of fine kindling
Joined
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6,199 Posts
I think the best advise is in showing up to a job just before they start to roll out. Introduce yourself as you help roll out the cords and hoses. Come back the next time and do it again. Offer to work for a few days for free if he decides you are not worth the job. Probably will not come to it but it shows how much you believe in your abilities.

nothing is more impressive than being present and ready to work first thing. And nothing should be easier for you to do. Get over the embarrassment of asking for a job. Usually I will tell a guy where to go looking if I'm not hiring.

learn to just be yourself and relax when talking to the boss. No one really wants a frothy mouth kid. We want someone that is comfortable in their skin and shows up without any drama about it. I'd rather hire a guy that can make me laugh while he is working than someone a bit faster but brings the mood down.

Anyway, keep trying even when it looks bleak. We all have to that.

Good Luck
 

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always building
Joined
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1,814 Posts
visit the established lumber yards in your area ( not home depot, Lowes, etc.) go to the contractors counter, they all have one. Get there early (7:00am) to better your chances of being noticed by contractors that have work . Don't be shy, introduce yourself and more importantly remember the names and faces of the people you meet. A lot of lumber stores have a desk or wall with business cards of the contractors that buy from them. Don't just grab some cards and leave, rather, ask the counter people (whose name you've not forgotten:thumbsup:) if they can give you any recommendations as far perspective employers. put those cards on top, go home and start making contacts. None of this " hey man got any work?", tell them who you are, how you got their #, and why your calling, don't forget to drop the names of the counter people who helped you ou. Lastly, make sure you give them your contact info!!!.
Now if you really want a job! make a "contact sheet" and take notes down after each conversation with potential employers; your gonna use these notes once a week, every week! to call back the persons that you think you might want to work for. you call, every week same time "just checkin' back", persistance pay off!!. Now some fellas might feel the need to express in a not so polite manner how much the dislike you calling them every monday. plain and simple truth is they're the ones failing your interview and your probably better off not working for them anyways.
Once you've landed yourself a job, you can send your first paycheck to...:whistling just kidding. seriously don't throw away your contact sheet!!!! you never know how things are gonna work out, besides in this business it's just as much who you know as what you know!!! hope this helps. P.S. looking for a job is a full time job until you find a job!
 

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General Contractor
Joined
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3,444 Posts
Young guys (and way too many older guys, too) haven't yet discovered the wisdom of learning from what has happened repeatedly for centuries before they were ever born. They waste so much valuable time spinning their wheels and trying to reinvent the wheel... and then just spinning it again when they think they have come up with a new wheel.

For cryin' out loud, even the Bible tells you exactly how this principle of persistance works so perfectly in Luke 18: 1-5.
 

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Forming and Framing
Joined
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6,273 Posts
Hey guys, I been lurking around this website for a bit, I love browsing all the different sections and learning....

I'm 19 years old from California, I have been working for a company ever since I was in middle school, working on summers to make a little cash, and after I graduated school, I have been working almost full time - whenever work was available. We mostly did residential and commercial remodeling, so I have had experience from demo'ing - finishing the remodel, but also had experience in most of the trades, such as framing, and whatever else came up. Every day we did something different, so I learned a lot, although I do have a lot to learn.

The company I worked for slowed down a lot, I'm still living at home with my parents, so it's not like I have major bills to be paid, but I need to find a steady job. I am not picky about which trade, just something that pays descent. I gained a lot of trust from my boss because I never cheat or lie, I am always honest, he trusted me with anything, and you guys probably won't beleive this, but I didn't even have to give him a time card, he trusted my word. Although I gave one anyways just to be organized.

I never went job hunting, so I started out on craigslist, I was pretty disapointed with the payscale of $10.00 - $12.00 ???? So now I am just confused, what would be the average pay for an apprentice? I need your guys advice on where I should start? How should I find a job? If a company is looking to hire an apprentice, would I qualify for one? Do I need some kind of classes or need to be enrolled in school for that? If you guys can explain that a little more to me, I would be very happy!

I am a hard worker, I know I have a lot to learn, and I really want to learn. Where should I start? Or just give a few pointers if you can.

Thanks, hope I don't come off as a begger or anything for my first post, just wanted to ask from a professionals point of view on this career path :).
Well I'm 13 and i have alot skill with trades so i build sheds..not hack jobs but properly built i shingle roofs and i build fences and stuff..you kind of sound like me I am hardworking too and i go to different framing sites and i see if they need clean up done cuz u have to start at the bottom and work your way uup
 

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General Contractor
Joined
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8,082 Posts
You 19, whats wrong with $10-12 in hour to prove your worth. If you show up on the door step and you know a few technical terms and ask for doctor wages, nobody will hire you. Patience... Get a foot in the door prove you there to work, not to waste anybody's time and you will get ahead. Nobody wants to lose a guy who will make them money, so they will jack up your pay wages quick, because you a young guy and if you good as you say you're, not many out there like you... and if you see you not getting ahead, you move on and seek a better opportunity.
In addition, keep in mind, this is hard times, most laying people off not hiring them, while you looking, try to find your own work locally i,e paper adds, flyer's etc, to make money you have to put up a little money and you might get busy doing your own thing and pull $25-35 in hour on your own.
Don't give up it takes time :thumbsup:

Good luck
 

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Registered
Joined
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3 Posts
Where are you located in California? I am a General Contractor in San Francisco and looking for a helper fairly soon. I do both residential and commercial remodels as well as quite a bit of tile work.
 

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Super Moderator
Joined
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11,965 Posts
The OP posted a question, and we all came to the rescue as usual, and then disappeared with a total post count of one.

WillieT put some darn good work and more than a "few minutes" into responding to this one post wonder. I've done the same and so have most of us.

Perhaps it's time to put a minimum post count on members before they can start a new thread.
 

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David Festa
Joined
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2,561 Posts
I’ll add my two cents
You picked the wrong time to choose a carrier in construction.
Your best bet at your age is to try to get in the union
I would try getting into a local union in Vegas
Here in NJ the casinos have union carpenters and from what I understand they stay pretty busy
I was going to join back in the early 90’s but the construction biz on the outside was booming
 

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Sigh, I read the whole thread, then got excited when I saw he had a possible job offer. Then realized it was 2 months dead. I probably read more of it, then the OP :furious:.
 

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The OP posted a question, and we all came to the rescue as usual, and then disappeared with a total post count of one.

WillieT put some darn good work and more than a "few minutes" into responding to this one post wonder. I've done the same and so have most of us.

Perhaps it's time to put a minimum post count on members before they can start a new thread.
he probably decided an office job was for him :laughing:
 

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Capra Aegagrus
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The OP posted a question, and we all came to the rescue as usual, and then disappeared with a total post count of one.

WillieT put some darn good work and more than a "few minutes" into responding to this one post wonder. I've done the same and so have most of us.

Perhaps it's time to put a minimum post count on members before they can start a new thread.
I would respectfully offer that it's all good anyway. The question is valid as are the responses. While we may feel deprived when a one-poster never comes back, good advice has been shared for all to see and benefit from, if they're so minded.

If it helps even one casual browser, that might just be worth the lack of personal gratification from a response that may or may not be sincere. :thumbsup:
 
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