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Hi all. I enjoy looking at CT so I thought I would join in.
I have a client that wants me to use one of those house kits to build their house with. Has anyone used one of these?
Thanks
 

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which ones?

I been on a few Lindal and Timber Peg homes,i'm impressed with the quality of materials..as far as the siding went anyway..
 

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A few of them are built around here, Nelson Homes out of Canada I believe. Don't seem to be to bad the ones I have worked on.
 

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If I understand correctly, the Menard's homes aren't really a kit. It's a set of plans, plus a materials list, i.e. take-off. The plans and take-off are inexpensive ($100 or so?). You can then take the take-off to Menard's (or anyone else) and buy your materials, at whatever price they will cost you. The price that Menard's shows you (let's say $70K) is simply their current estimate of what someone, somewhere, might pay for the materials on the takeoff. If you want something slightly different, or if your AHJ requires something different, you will buy those things instead of what's in the plans.

The person who builds the house needs to be able to take construction drawings and a pile of materials, and build a house, using the same knowledge and skills that would be used by anyone else building a house. There's no Lego-style, or (showing my age) Lincoln-Log-style easier way to do it, at least not with the Menard's plans.

That's my understanding, anyway. I'd get into Menards and talk with them. If this is accurate, then your prospect should go ahead and buy the plans with takeoff ($100?) and give them to you for you to quote the job.

Let us know what happens. I'm curious.
 

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I'm on my first kit home, panelised, prebuilt walls from Viceroy in Canada. This house has by far been my worst headache in building. While the company preaches that it goes up a min. 25% faster than conventional framing I'm finding the opposite. Way too many glitches in the how the computer frames the panels & everytime you need to make a correction involves pulling the nails on the sheathing. Way too many hinge points too be considered good design. I can see the advantage for a crew who specializes in these but I still don't see the value for the homeowner or builder who stands behind his work.

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Many years ago, I was a lowly helper for a guy who went on to build very large and beautiful houses.
He specialized in Log Homes. the "kits" from Lodge Log and a couple others were really nice, and actually a lot of fun to build.
 

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I'm on my first kit home, panelised, prebuilt walls from Viceroy in Canada. This house has by far been my worst headache in building. While the company preaches that it goes up a min. 25% faster than conventional framing I'm finding the opposite. Way too many glitches in the how the computer frames the panels & everytime you need to make a correction involves pulling the nails on the sheathing. Way too many hinge points too be considered good design. I can see the advantage for a crew who specializes in these but I still don't see the value for the homeowner or builder who stands behind his work.

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I very much agree with you,the numerous hing points prevalent with almost all panelized homes is something I'M not fond of at all.
 

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I think the previous comment on the take-off list was correct.

I like to try to design something which suits my capabilities. For example, I don't have any desire to get up in the air, so I like ranch homes. I don't really care to stand and look at a set of plans while I build a home with seven gables in the front and a cluster for a roof.

I would stay away from vaulted ceilings because of the insulation factor and the pain in finishing them.

I haven't ever used anything but 2x's for floor joists and have no interest in trying the OSB joists or trusses.

So what I'm saying is to pick some design that you and your crew (if you have a crew) are comfortable with. If you don't want to set 50' 12/12 trusses on the top of a 3-story home, then don't choose that design.
 
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