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One of our jobs-same thing, old fueling station at a State road shed, one of the footing trenches for the new building caught on fire:eek:I guess it just burned for a minute, so no pictures exist.

Wyoming being Wyoming, they decided to ignore the contaminated soils problem and proceed. It was, after all, a State job and it was over 50 yards to the Bear River.:censored: Whatever. It sure shook up our Supe, though!
 

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I've dealt with contaminated sites but have never seen anything like that.

Surprised there is no water curtain or other safety procedures in place.
 

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Never dealt with anything like that.

There are some companies that will haul away contaminated soils from underground tanks, but from the looks of that, it wouldn't be safe to load and haul that stuff.

I'm pretty sure they haul it to a facility that burns the soil to remove the fuel contamination.
 

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Thom
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Petroleum contaminated soil can be added to asphalt mix in limited quantities.

A common way of decontaminating soil is to install wells that they pump air into the earth through. It seems soils already contain microbes that will eat oil but, they multiply so fast in an oil rich environment that they consume all the oxygen in the soil. Pumping air down will replenish the oxygen and the little buggers will multiply quite rapidly.

It works as long as it is above the water table. They were doing that at a local truck stop I was renovating almost 20 years ago.
 

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John the Builder
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Petroleum contaminated soil can be added to asphalt mix in limited quantities.

A common way of decontaminating soil is to install wells that they pump air into the earth through. It seems soils already contain microbes that will eat oil but, they multiply so fast in an oil rich environment that they consume all the oxygen in the soil. Pumping air down will replenish the oxygen and the little buggers will multiply quite rapidly.

It works as long as it is above the water table. They were doing that at a local truck stop I was renovating almost 20 years ago.
Cool! You learned me something today.
 

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Petroleum contaminated soil can be added to asphalt mix in limited quantities.

A common way of decontaminating soil is to install wells that they pump air into the earth through. It seems soils already contain microbes that will eat oil but, they multiply so fast in an oil rich environment that they consume all the oxygen in the soil. Pumping air down will replenish the oxygen and the little buggers will multiply quite rapidly.

It works as long as it is above the water table. They were doing that at a local truck stop I was renovating almost 20 years ago.
Now it is done the opposite way, they use a vacuum type system with pipes bringing fresh air in and a huge vacuum pump connected to a filter to pull the air through. Microbes or chemicals can be added to the air intake if needed.

A gas tanker truck near me spilled 9000 of gas and that is the system they are using now after removing I believe 200 truckloads of soil.

You can actually buy those microbes online, just spray or pour on contaminated soil.
 

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Petroleum contaminated soil can be added to asphalt mix in limited quantities.

A common way of decontaminating soil is to install wells that they pump air into the earth through. It seems soils already contain microbes that will eat oil but, they multiply so fast in an oil rich environment that they consume all the oxygen in the soil. Pumping air down will replenish the oxygen and the little buggers will multiply quite rapidly.

It works as long as it is above the water table. They were doing that at a local truck stop I was renovating almost 20 years ago.
Now it is done the opposite way, they use a vacuum type system with pipes bringing fresh air in and a huge vacuum pump connected to a filter to pull the air through. Microbes or chemicals can be added to the air intake if needed.

A gas tanker truck near me spilled 9000 of gas and that is the system they are using now after removing I believe 200 truckloads of soil.

You can actually buy those microbes online, just spray or pour on contaminated soil.
In California if contamination is low enough burners are brought on site and soil is decontaminated. It is then hauled away. In small enough quantities it is just dug up & hauled to a designated disposal site. All this is done with an extensive paper trail.

For extensive and deep contaminated sites after top layer of soil is removed underground plume is measured and monitored via test wells. $$$$$$

Work plan is submitted to Regional Water Quality control Board.
More monitoring wells are installed. Then an Ozone Generator is set up on site and also Hydrogen Peroxide pump. Ozone & Peroxide are pumped into the ground at various levels and neutralize the diesel oil.

Engineering company checks Ozone & Peroxide every two weeks. Wells are monitored quarterly.

There is no odor or noise that bothers anyone. This system is currently in operation at a high school, for 3 years, with no issues at all.
 

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Our crew, Hake Group lit Sunoco Marcus Hook up five times while building a sulfur recovery unit in 2000. Ground would ignite just from excavator friction.
 

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Renaissance Man
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Discussion Starter #14
Our crew, Hake Group lit Sunoco Marcus Hook up five times while building a sulfur recovery unit in 2000. Ground would ignite just from excavator friction.
I'm familiar with the name - that refinery is not too far from where I'm at :thumbsup:
 

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I used to work on an AF base from the mid '70's to early '80's.
They had oil separator pits that the storm runoff from the flightline went through.
They were nothing more than a vertical conveyor belt that ran through the water and when the belt came up the oil would be on the belt.


There was a contaminated gas station site not far from me that had a small shed set up with a panel on it that had all kinds of colored lights on it.
No matter what time of day or night those lights were always on, blinking, flashing, etc. That thing was there for about 15 years and just this spring they finally came and dismantled everything, dug up a little bit of the ground, removed the test well, and then finally graded and seeded the lot.
 

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For the past 5-6 years I worked in the environmental remediation business. All the types described here are more or less correct, with a few differences.

The excavation you see in the video is not an uncommon situation. That said very rarely is any fire caused. You have to have a very right conditions for fire to happen. Excavation is usually the most common depending on your state regulations. A lot of the time an excavation is the start, or end of a remediation project.

Now on to the systems themselves.

There is injection wells. Depending on the product released, will determine what is injected. I have done systems that inject pure O2. Others inject soybean or other vegetable oils. Injections around here are not terribly common until the tail end of a systems life.

Typically most systems consist of a Soil Vapor Extraction system. This is the workhorse. Piping is connected to wells drilled where the product is. This piping is connected to what is basically a super charger. The blower is used pull vapors. This works best with volatiles such as solvents, and gasoline. Depending on concentrations, The vapor will get directly vented to atmosphere. As the concentrations get higher, the vapors have to go through activated carbon. The highest concentrations will have to go through a catalytic oxidizer. Some are a chemical reaction, most just burn the vapors.

Typically a SVE system is installed with an Air Sparge system. Air sparge is nothing but a well that is connected to an air compressor. Compressed air is forced into the ground. Sometimes they are used to create a "curtain" to prevent the spilled product from moving out of an area. Most of the time they are used to push product towards an SVE well.

Then there are Dual Phase systems. These will use SVE to help pull product towards a well. They are used in combination with a pump in the well. Depending on the product will depend on the pump. A common one is a floating air powered pump. These pumps are good for viscous liquids such as hydraulic oil.

Another style would be a pump and treat system. These systems use wells with products on the water table. These systems will pump a massive amount of water and product. Then they will treat the water with a system that will clean the water to meet any direct discharge requirements for the state.

Not a lot of information on these systems get out. Most companies treat them like a dirty little secret. Most of the time, there is a confidentiality agreement by contractor and client. Most of the time employees are also bound by that agreement.
 

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I have heard of soils that contain so much petroleum products that they have an extremely low "flash Point". I think that is what you are experiencing. great video and thanks for sharing. It is great to see an example of what you read in reports from time to time.
 
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