Contractor Talk - Professional Construction and Remodeling Forum banner
1 - 20 of 32 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,864 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm working on my own place and am planning on doing a skip trowel on some of the walls and ceilings. I'm on a time crunch and am thinking I could use a 90 minute hot mud for my texture. The heat is a bit iffy right now, and it's cold and damp.

Is it a good idea to use the 90, or is the actual dry time so I can prime going to be about the same? Or is there a reason not to use the hot mud? It may not matter, as I may just use topping anyway, but I am looking for any options to speed things up.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
11,331 Posts
I wouldn't use hot mud for a skip trowel hand texture. :no:
1) Inconsistency- The hot mud is constantly changing as time goes.
2) The hot mud will probably take longer to completely dry then all purpose mud. Ap is an air dry and hot mud takes a chemical reaction to set. But even though the hot mud is set up, it doesn't mean it's completely dry and ready for paint.

My vote is for USG all purpose joint compound for a skip trowel texture. If want to speed up the drying time, put a fan on it. :thumbsup:
 

·
Want to play a game?
Joined
·
4,522 Posts
I agree with what Pall said. Although USG does make a powder mix for texture that I have found to work well skipping and it dries a little faster.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
110 Posts
90% of all my work is hand texture. Either skip trowel or Santa Fe and we always use USG green top. I use a power aid bottle with the top cut off and add four and a half cups of water to each box of mud. I do this to keep every bucket of texture consistent. Texturing with hot mud would be a nightmare! Add some heat and a dan and the texture will dry pretty fast!
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
11,331 Posts
I agree with what Paul said. Although USG does make a powder mix for texture that I have found to work well skipping and it dries a little faster.
That would work too. Never used the powder texture mix for skip trowel before. But I like to use it when I'm spraying knockdown, especially on ceilings.

A lot of times when the skip trowel conversation comes up on here. The definition of skip trowel is regional and what skip trowel is to one area is knockdown to another.

Do you guys put sand in your skip trowel?
 

·
GC/carpenter
Joined
·
43,949 Posts
Sir Mixalot said:
That would work too. Never used the powder texture mix for skip trowel before. But I like to use it when I'm spraying knockdown, especially on ceilings. A lot of times when the skip trowel conversation comes up on here. The definition of skip trowel is regional and what skip trowel is to one area is knockdown to another. Do you guys put sand in your skip trowel?
We put sand in the skip only if specified. It was much more popular back in the 70's and 80's
 

·
GC/carpenter
Joined
·
43,949 Posts
Our skips out here have become hardly a skip at all, it's more like smooth wall with a skip every two or three feet or so. Seems like there was a time when skip trowel looked a lot like leopard spots or tiger stripes. Over the ages that has gotten less and less skips.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
110 Posts
Californiadecks said:
Our skips out here have become hardly a skip at all, it's more like smooth wall with a skip every two or three feet or so. Seems like there was a time when skip trowel looked a lot like leopard spots or tiger stripes. Over the ages that has gotten less and less skips.
The more smooth version we call a Santa Fe. It can go from what your talking about to maybe fifty percent smooth and fifty percent skip. I call the really smooth with hardly any voids a "holy smooth wall"
A regular skip trowel is basically what you are talking about with lots of dots and/or striping. We go from a tiny micro dot skip all the way up to a large purina checkerboard skip.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,864 Posts
Discussion Starter · #13 ·
This pretty much answered my question. I used topping last night and it was so much less stressful than it would have been with hot mud. Just chill and texture.

Skip trowel was the first texture I was taught as well. Most likely because we didn't have a hopper on sight, and it fit in with the old house we were doing. My version is pretty heavy, more of a plop, push, swipe with large coverage and less misses. For my wife last night I hit it with the trowel after it started to set up to smooth it down a bit and catch less dust later.

I did notice last night that one box to the next was a bit inconsistent. Or maybe my arm was just wearing out towards the end. Tonight, I'll add a bit of water to thin it down.
 

·
GC/carpenter
Joined
·
43,949 Posts
Mountain Man said:
Some Santa Fe hand texture with about 40% skip in it.
Nice texture MM that's a good look. It all boils down to preference. I don't like it too wild, but yours is just about right, IMO. Go into some Mexican Restaurants and the texture is so heavy you could lose some meat if you brushed up against it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
110 Posts
I hear ya!! All my textures for the most part are really smooth. I three step the texture when putting it on. First apply a couple pans of mud then give it a bit of a smear and then when it sets up to the right consistency , I hit it with the knife one more time smoothing it out and freeing it up of any tool or lap marks. And even though it's very smooth at this point I brush it down with the sanding pole.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
468 Posts
If you arnt using a trowel it cant be called a skip trowel:no:. A skip trowel texture IMO is done by dobbing the ceilingl with trowel ( and hawk) and making small stalagmites on ceiling. Wait a few minutes and knock it down.
 
1 - 20 of 32 Posts
Top