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So doesn’t the lien stay on the property forever until withdrawn or cleared? They can’t sell the house with a lien in place … right?
Unfortunately, "most" contractors do not bother to learn the lein laws in their state until something happens. At that point, sometimes it's to late and they end up short.

If you are going to own a construction business, you need to understand the laws in your state.

In Florida, once a contractor files a lien on a property, they have one year from the date of filing to enforce the lein or it becones void. Enforcement means foreclosure on the property. But, it's not quite that simple.

First, an owner can lift a lein from their property. They can place 1.5 times the amount of the lein in escrow with an attorney and the lein can be removed.

Another thing to take into consideration is that in order to foreclose on a property, you have to be the first lein holder. So for example, if the client has a home valued at say $ 300,000.00 and they have a mortgage say with a balance of $ 250,000.00, in order to foreclose, you need to pay off the first lein holder (the mortgage company) so that you become the first lein holder.

There are other things to take into consideration, but it depends on your area.

Contractors in general have a major flaw. They trust too much.

Case in point, when was the last time you ran a credit check on your client before starting work.

Suppose you sign a contract for a $ 50,000.00 addition. Did you check to see if they have a mortgage on the property? What if the house is worth say $ 300,000.00 and they have a $ 300,000.00 mortgage? What good is a lein on a property with no equity.

Money of you guys need to educate yourselves on how to protect your business.

There are people out there that will screw you in a second.

For example, suppose I have a $ 300,000.00 house with a $ 250,000.00 mortgage. I hire you to put a $ 150,000.00 addition. Before we sign, I talk to my brother and draft a document that he loaned me $ 200,000.00 cash. He then goes to the court house and files a lein on my property for the $ 200,000.00 loan. The property now has $ 500,000.00 in leins. I then don't pay you and you file a lein. Well, a lein on what? There is no equity in the property.

Or, what if the proerty is in the husband and wife's name and your contract is signed only by the wife? Guess what, you cannot file a lein and you will never collect.

Or suppose you are remodeling a restaurant and sign a contract with ABC restaurant. You go in for the final payment and ABC restaurant closed down. But, now their is a new restaurant called XYZ owned by the same guy servingvthe customers. ABC went out of business and XYZ owes you nothing. How do you get paid then?

Way to many cintractors do not know what they do not know.

Think about it. You do a job and put out your own money to pay labor or materials or whatever. You recieved a deposit of say $ 5,000.00 and you are now into the job say $ 6,000.00 until you get the next check. But now the husband and wife are getting a divorce. Now what.

If someone wants to remodel their kitchen, contractors give them (strangers) credit.

If these same people applied for a $ 500.00 credit card or personal loan from the bank, they would have there credit checked. If they wanted a $ 10,000.00 loan they would have to put up collateral.

Most contractors take a nice smile and a signature on a peace of paper as guaranty. Then they end up in a situation like the OP here.

If you want to servive in this industry, never work with your money no matter what. If the OP was working with the owners money, he would not have needed to file a lein.
 

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When I used to have my Commercial Awning Contractors License (which was one chapter shy of a CGC at that time in my County. I also did Marine Canvas and Upholstery as well as very high end Draperies and window treatments, I put in my contract ALL Materials Remain the Property Of Sew & Sews which at the time was before I became a Designer. I have been building and remodeling my entire life and just progressed from one type of materials used in design and fabrication into another. It is amazing how much designing, patterning and fabricating translate into all forms of materials be they aluminum awning frames, designing a full enclosure for a boat or building a house. Always protect the monetary and physical investment you have in any job. I only had to use it once and when the Sheriffs Officer showed up he informed the boat owner that yes I had the legal right to remove everything that was listed in the contract. I was paid right on the spot.
 

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I don't believe it is rational to spend $3,000-$5,000 for an attorney to get $7,000.
It's rational if you're looking for justice. Irrational if you're spending twice the damages in order to get it.

There are things that can lawfully intercede that should go in every contract. One is the stepped payments...such as a draw for part of the work performed. If they miss the 1st payment or refuse to pay the draw, the contract can be suited to your benefit by stating something to the effect...all amounts due at the time of invoice are payable upon demand. After 10 days, the amounts due start to pick up on your favorite rate of interest...which in most cases, hang in around 1.5% a month (18% annum). PLUS the language of All Exepenses, Fees, Court & Filing Costs and the legal expense of collection and enforcement of the contract.

There's another little tip that might come in handy...in Georgia we have a online access to all things in the Clerks Book Rooms for every county. Here it's called the GSCCA. Every phone call that comes in (or used to come in, I've retired this past month after 50 years) obtains info on the property address as well as the full names of the folks on the phone. While my gal is on the line collecting that info...I've already brought up GSCCA to the house address for the county it's in and start to cross check the last warranty/security deeds to make sure we're talking to the owners. If there's an issue with that....I'll zip over to that county's Tax Commissioner's office and pull up the last record to see who's on the tax bill. If neither source comes up with the same folks on the line...she just hangs up.

If they call back, I'll answer the phone and give the polite WTF interrogation.

SOME people know how to play the game of just how far they can take someone to the cleaners for free work. Especially in the era of Flip-Wads that already know what laws protect them against you.

An online service to all the bookrooms here is $25 a month. That $25 a month has saved me $thousands in wasted trips; wasted concept drawings to get a tentative proposal together.

A contract can be produced without a lawyer...as one of the guys above said, as long as they sign the document with all of the points agreed upon, it's usually enough. Severability is a bit item in the contracts as well in order not to null the contract from one item that doesn't conform to the State laws on contracts.


I've reviewed this software and it appears to cover all the bases and is geared and updated continuously with regards to any changes in the state on contract laws dealing with contractors.

It produces a comprehensive contract that can be slighted in the favor of either party...or simply neutral as to how the language is phased for both clients....as well as producing Sub-Contractor work agreements.

 

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I saw something for the first time in Georgia dealing with liens. A friend of mine has a son and family that is in the process of trying to build...but the builder couldn't to the point of putting a roof on it for nearly a year. Upon closer inspection...it became apparent to me that the frame job would not have passed as it had some major issues with the stick framed roof and more things than he could get someone out there to fix as the pick up truck artiste framers were long gone. In any case...the owners declared the contract in default...of which it was and told the guy he was no longer welcome on the property which was prudent.

Brown Wood Brick Brickwork Hardwood


The owners started getting liens on materials; sub contracted electrical and HVAC as well as a total bill for Pella windows.

The owners had already engaged a local firm to help them with their recovery on money's paid out...which included moneys paid for Pella, HVAC, Electrical subs as well as materials.

The attorney filed an immediate suit to dismiss the liens as the produced draw affidavits that spelled out the breakdown where the money had been applied BY the builder which include all of those filing liens. Since the information was intact with cancelled checks denoting the draw/draft date and number...the materials and work on the property were paid for and those that wanted their money would have to pursue the builder who acted as conduit between parties.

The providers did NOT have to lift the liens until they were assured by the courts that the amounts had been paid in by the property owners.

The attorneys then filed a suit against the builder for a new one on me...."Defamation of Title" and "Slander of Title."

Slander of Title
came about by the inactions of the builder to pay off the amounts due which caused the liens that clouded the title.
Defamation of Title came about by written and published actions by the builder in his response letters to the providers about who actually owed the money.

The only thing that would have made either of those issues a real monetary penalty jeopardy to the builder would have been...if the house was being marketed for sale and the sale fell through due the bogus liens that were backed up on letters telling the providers that he had not been paid and their recourse would be to lien the property.

The moral of the tale...if you come to point of filing a lien, be certain that you don't have a paper trail or anything in conversation that might prove false or questionable that might come back to pretty much insist on your withdrawing your liens.
 

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I always get a kick out of contractors who think by filing a lien, they will automatically get paid. There's a lot of good info in this thread, but it generally comes down to doing your paperwork correctly. Take Florida. If you are a sub or supplier (not the GC), you have to file a Notice to Owner within 45 days of first furnishing labor or materials. If you don't file, that's the first thing defense to the lien. And yes, if you are a corporation, you have to have an attorney. And, anyone who is not a corporation is crazy.

The comment about having your brother-in-law loan you money is great. I was actually told something similar by an "asset protection attorney" years ago. Best $1k I ever spent!
 

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The contract rules in almost all cases.

It's also the cheapest form of stopping any civil pursuit if all the bases are covered dealing time, overages, work change orders, payment schedule, description of each phase of work and the agreed upon price. The last two are uppermost...the more you describe and define what work is to be done...the less the misunderstanding. The price...it is what it is. I do the work on YOUR property, my proposal is to perform as needed to meet the work definition for $xxxxx.00

I know a fellow who poured a patio and a paver stamped walkway towards the rear of the house. Part of the deal was for him to set up to form a set of concrete steps that climbed the embankment which looks like 10 risers. On the bottom poured tread went the handrail post brackets embedded into the pour. He came back the next day to inspect the site and collect the amount due and the gal that hired him told him...she needed him to put up the handrails on the steps. He allowed that he wasn't a carpenter and had no intention of doing that work. She pretty told him that if she had to hire someone to do the work, she'd have to hold back $500.

He realized that he'd been "Little Old Ladied" by this elderly gal that knew the ropes about what the expenses are to go to court to enforce a $500 deadbeat and told the crew to pack it up....left and let her win that argument.

My way would have been to finish up the limits on the agreement, go home and send the first invoice that allowed the payment was over due as of the date of completion...but not paid out in full. I'd send an invoice every two weeks to show the 1.5% finance rate per month and the projected amount due with interest on a certain date in two weeks. You either become the pest and thorn in the side or some people will just write you off as a "light weight" and you'll never get your amount in full. With my invoicing; interest; and notices where to send the payment in full pursuant to the tenets of the agreement...I'm doing my part to show the court that I tried to fulfill the agreement as written and agreed upon; but the client wasn't interested in what the document says...even though she signed off on it.


I'd like to say...this case is an exception to the rule....but at this day and age....the more contract language in logical sequence to what started on the day of signatures and up to the point of completion...per the agreement definition (sometimes as of the day of the final inspection or reasonably completed by 95% or more)...I'm allowed to start making my request for payment to meet the term date of the contract. The rate of interest is necessary because you've actually made a short loan on the amount and ae entitled to the agreed upon rate. The other people that are interested would be the IRS...in the event this year of the contract were audited and they find that you didn't charge interest against the amount of money due. They'll assume a general rate and attach that to your income statement in weight to your return.

It's just business...and the first order of business...protect yourself with a contract that would stand the hairs up on the back of any lawyers neck while reading it. Not that it's scary...but it's complete as to how the contract is there for equitable fairness...but also what would happen if the client decides to play game and refuse to pay. I'd walk away with a "I'll send you an invoice tomorrow with a due date for a payment in full."

If she continues to miss those due dates....she's deemed to be "stubbornly litigious."

Those fill in the blank contracts on the above cited URL...makes for a very complete document and pretty phased around the State of Georgia contractor/contract type of law.
 

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I've been involved in a couple of lawsuits over the years -- mostly large commercial projects. One involved a "pay if paid" clause. After 5 years in litigation, I lost. I had offered 75% of the amount in arbitration. Keep in mind I was NOT paid. Sub turned it down. So, I ultimately lost and had to pay. What was ironic was that the sub's attorney gave him a bill for more than the amount he got paid!

My attorney said there is no such thing as a perfect contract. In this case, I know we got "hometowned". However, there also seems to be a perception that all GC's are sleezy and are out to screw either the Owner or the sub.
 

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I've been involved in a couple of lawsuits over the years -- mostly large commercial projects. One involved a "pay if paid" clause. After 5 years in litigation, I lost. I had offered 75% of the amount in arbitration. Keep in mind I was NOT paid. Sub turned it down. So, I ultimately lost and had to pay. What was ironic was that the sub's attorney gave him a bill for more than the amount he got paid!

My attorney said there is no such thing as a perfect contract. In this case, I know we got "hometowned". However, there also seems to be a perception that all GC's are sleezy and are out to screw either the Owner or the sub.
Sounds like you went to mediation not arbitration.

Mediation is ordered by a judge and you can make an offer. If you hit an impass, then it goes to jury trial.

Arbitration is different. Arbitration is more informal and allows you the opportunity to say and do things normally not allowed in a regular jury trial. Jury trials generally do not favor the contractor.
I've been involved in a couple of lawsuits over the years -- mostly large commercial projects. One involved a "pay if paid" clause. After 5 years in litigation, I lost. I had offered 75% of the amount in arbitration. Keep in mind I was NOT paid. Sub turned it down. So, I ultimately lost and had to pay. What was ironic was that the sub's attorney gave him a bill for more than the amount he got paid!

My attorney said there is no such thing as a perfect contract. In this case, I know we got "hometowned". However, there also seems to be a perception that all GC's are sleezy and are out to screw either the Owner or the sub.
Here is a teaching and learning moment for those of you that have a business.

Warning, long post! Sharks comment at your own risk!


Sounds like you went to "mediation" not "arbitration".

Mediation is ordered by a judge to try and reach a settlement and avoid a jury trial. If you reach an impasse in mediation, then it heads to jury trial. Jury trial tends to not favor the business owner. Jury's do not like businesses. They always tend to go for the little guy.

Arbitration is always better. In arbitration both parties get to select the arbitrator. It does not need to be a judge. It can be a retired contractor. This favors you because the arbitrator does not depend on a jury and is able to read between the lines. Never go to jury trial!

Years ago, I had about 100 men working for me out of town. The men were divided into teams and each team road to and from work in a van we provided. The driver was responsible for the team and documenting their hours.

We hired this one guy. The day after his first paycheck, he came back to work drunk as a dog. When confronted about his intoxication, he threatened the team leader. He pulled up his shirt and showed him a couple stab and a gunshot wound. He said he was a gang member and been stabbed and shot before. He threatened the team leader and stated he was going to burn down the van and job-site. He was fired on the spot so he only worked one week with us.

One week later, we got contacted by workmans comp. He told them he broke his arm at work. Three months later, my company got sued by him. He claimed he had worked 70 hours a week for four weeks and was was only paid for one 40 hour week. He claimed that when he broke his elbow while working form us, we fired him and he never got paid what he was due.

Mind you, he worked with a team and everyone on the team worked the exact same 40 hours per week and he only worked for one week. In addition, I had 10 witnesses that could verify how long he worked, that he was never injured on the job, the threats he made since they all worked together.

We new there was no way he would win so we defended the suet rather than paying. Because this was a federal job, we fell under the Fair Labor Standards Act and had to go to federal jury trial.

At trial, we were not allowed to testify as to his being drunk, his threats or is prior history which we discovered had assault, jail time and he had two current warrants for his arrest. One for battery on an officer when he escaped from them as he was being arrested for a domestic violence warrant they were trying to serve on him. I was also not allowed to notify the police where he was because my attorney said I would be in trouble for interfering with his right to a trial.

The jury ruled in his favor. We were ordered to pay him $ 5,000.00 and his $ 35,000.00 legal fee. Including my companies legal fees, it cost me $ 85,000.00.

He also claimed a comp claim on his arm. He got $ 20,000.00 from comp for that one. I was told by some of the men he broke his arm in a bar fight the day he was fired.

After this , I was dead set on never again hiring an employee that was not vetted and never paying an employee without a release. I contacted my attorney and had him draw up a form that every employee that works for me has had to sign since then. The form basically says something to this effect:

"I hereby attest that I have been paid in full for all hours I have worked for XYZ company for week ending XXXX, including all overtime hours I was due. I further attest that I have not sustained any injuries on the job for the same time period."

Just how we never pay a vendor or sub without a lien release being signed, we never pay an employee without them signing that form. Every single pay check in our records has a signed form filed with it.

About five years later, another man sued us claiming he was not paid overtime six months after being fired. I gave my attorney a copy of the signed forms. After sending the guys attorney copies, the suet was dropped and we never heard form him again.

A couple years after that, another former employee tried to file a comp claim a few weeks after being fired. When I was contacted by comp, I sent them copies of his signed forms an last I heard they didn't pay a dime.
 

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20 years as licensed contractor in florida and I have been involved in one lien issue. Had a texture company fail at spraying an interior on a spec house for an investment company. Told them to scrap and respray the entire house or I will hire someone else to do it. They refused and filed a lien against the house for $2,500. I paid $3,750 to bond the lien off the property to clear the title. I paid two inspectors ($150 x 2) to write reports about the deficient work. I paid $3,000 for someone to correct the work. Hired a lawyer with a $5,000 retainer to sue the drywall company for all my costs. So I am $12,050 out of pocket, close out the house and get a cert of occupancy.

Eight months of depositions and legal filings cost be $4,000 on top of the retainer. One day trial costs me another $2,000 in legal fees. Total costs $18,050. We win the bench trial and the judge awards us our entire costs and enters a judgement for $14,300 in costs and attorney fees and releases the bond back to me. I got the $3,750 bond money returned and as my lawyer prepares to force collection on the debt owed, they file bankruptcy and I get nothing.

So I spent $14,300 for the courts to tell me that I was right and all I got was the satisfaction of knowing that I put them out of business.

Four months later I saw the same guys spraying a house using the same van with a different name on it.
 

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Sounds like you went to mediation not arbitration.

Mediation is ordered by a judge and you can make an offer. If you hit an impass, then it goes to jury trial.

Arbitration is different. Arbitration is more informal and allows you the opportunity to say and do things normally not allowed in a regular jury trial. Jury trials generally do not favor the contractor.
The sub filed a lawsuit. We lost on a Motion for Summary Judgement. We appealed, mostly as a delay tactic. The Appeals Court ordered mediation. Mediator's report said the sub was not mediating in good faith. Appeals court overruled Summary Judgement and sent it back for trial. That's when we found out that the sub's attorney fees were $100k on a $100k claim. They did not challenge the clause in the subcontract that said each party bears it's own attorney fees. Opps. That's when we settled. Over 2 years, but that was partially what we wanted.
 

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Discussion Starter · #36 ·
Post their complaint please. Can't advise until I've heard the other side of the story.
The actual legal Complaint is 23 pages long. Mostly just legal jargon. The bottom line would be for me to release the lien so they could close on their house and pay the legal fees.
 

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Sounds like you went to mediation not arbitration.

Mediation is ordered by a judge and you can make an offer. If you hit an impass, then it goes to jury trial.

Arbitration is different. Arbitration is more informal and allows you the opportunity to say and do things normally not allowed in a regular jury trial. Jury trials generally do not favor the contractor.

Here is a teaching and learning moment for those of you that have a business.

Warning, long post! Sharks comment at your own risk!


Sounds like you went to "mediation" not "arbitration".

Mediation is ordered by a judge to try and reach a settlement and avoid a jury trial. If you reach an impasse in mediation, then it heads to jury trial. Jury trial tends to not favor the business owner. Jury's do not like businesses. They always tend to go for the little guy.

Arbitration is always better. In arbitration both parties get to select the arbitrator. It does not need to be a judge. It can be a retired contractor. This favors you because the arbitrator does not depend on a jury and is able to read between the lines. Never go to jury trial!

Years ago, I had about 100 men working for me out of town. The men were divided into teams and each team road to and from work in a van we provided. The driver was responsible for the team and documenting their hours.

We hired this one guy. The day after his first paycheck, he came back to work drunk as a dog. When confronted about his intoxication, he threatened the team leader. He pulled up his shirt and showed him a couple stab and a gunshot wound. He said he was a gang member and been stabbed and shot before. He threatened the team leader and stated he was going to burn down the van and job-site. He was fired on the spot so he only worked one week with us.

One week later, we got contacted by workmans comp. He told them he broke his arm at work. Three months later, my company got sued by him. He claimed he had worked 70 hours a week for four weeks and was was only paid for one 40 hour week. He claimed that when he broke his elbow while working form us, we fired him and he never got paid what he was due.

Mind you, he worked with a team and everyone on the team worked the exact same 40 hours per week and he only worked for one week. In addition, I had 10 witnesses that could verify how long he worked, that he was never injured on the job, the threats he made since they all worked together.

We new there was no way he would win so we defended the suet rather than paying. Because this was a federal job, we fell under the Fair Labor Standards Act and had to go to federal jury trial.

At trial, we were not allowed to testify as to his being drunk, his threats or is prior history which we discovered had assault, jail time and he had two current warrants for his arrest. One for battery on an officer when he escaped from them as he was being arrested for a domestic violence warrant they were trying to serve on him. I was also not allowed to notify the police where he was because my attorney said I would be in trouble for interfering with his right to a trial.

The jury ruled in his favor. We were ordered to pay him $ 5,000.00 and his $ 35,000.00 legal fee. Including my companies legal fees, it cost me $ 85,000.00.

He also claimed a comp claim on his arm. He got $ 20,000.00 from comp for that one. I was told by some of the men he broke his arm in a bar fight the day he was fired.

After this , I was dead set on never again hiring an employee that was not vetted and never paying an employee without a release. I contacted my attorney and had him draw up a form that every employee that works for me has had to sign since then. The form basically says something to this effect:

"I hereby attest that I have been paid in full for all hours I have worked for XYZ company for week ending XXXX, including all overtime hours I was due. I further attest that I have not sustained any injuries on the job for the same time period."

Just how we never pay a vendor or sub without a lien release being signed, we never pay an employee without them signing that form. Every single pay check in our records has a signed form filed with it.

About five years later, another man sued us claiming he was not paid overtime six months after being fired. I gave my attorney a copy of the signed forms. After sending the guys attorney copies, the suet was dropped and we never heard form him again.

A couple years after that, another former employee tried to file a comp claim a few weeks after being fired. When I was contacted by comp, I sent them copies of his signed forms an last I heard they didn't pay a dime.

@Ayangonz

You’ve had two recent posts giving business advice, that has been really solid. I mean that as sincerely as I’ve meant the times I’ve ragged on you. 🤣

No one gets upset at your long posts. Many of us here do the same.

The only thing people here have taken issue with is the extremely wide brush you tend to paint with.

Not all contractors want to do insurance restoration or mold remediation, and that’s absolutely fine. They don’t have to.

Not all contractors are Chuck in a Truck types, barely hanging on. The contractors I personally know are the complete opposite. When you make those unreasonable statements, it tends to piss people off.

But your posts about protecting your business have been very informative, and Ive appreciated them 👍
 

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Mason
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@Ayangonz

You’ve had two recent posts giving business advice, that has been really solid. I mean that as sincerely as I’ve meant the times I’ve ragged on you. 🤣

No one gets upset at your long posts. Many of us here do the same.

The only thing people here have taken issue with is the extremely wide brush you tend to paint with.

Not all contractors want to do insurance restoration or mold remediation, and that’s absolutely fine. They don’t have to.

Not all contractors are Chuck in a Truck types, barely hanging on. The contractors I personally know are the complete opposite. When you make those unreasonable statements, it tends to piss people off.

But your posts about protecting your business have been very informative, and Ive appreciated them 👍
Well, that was well said.
 

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@Ayangonz

You’ve had two recent posts giving business advice, that has been really solid. I mean that as sincerely as I’ve meant the times I’ve ragged on you. 🤣

No one gets upset at your long posts. Many of us here do the same.

The only thing people here have taken issue with is the extremely wide brush you tend to paint with.

Not all contractors want to do insurance restoration or mold remediation, and that’s absolutely fine. They don’t have to.

Not all contractors are Chuck in a Truck types, barely hanging on. The contractors I personally know are the complete opposite. When you make those unreasonable statements, it tends to piss people off.

But your posts about protecting your business have been very informative, and Ive appreciated them 👍
The thing is, I am not posting for the benefit of the veterans in here. They've been there and done that. No one can post something that applies to everyone. There are too many factors, age, experience, personal desire, social situation, ego, hight weight, strengths, education, and and and. So, when I post, it may apply to 5% of the people reading it.

When I post something, I have in mind someone in their 20's just starting out. I would give different advice to someone in their 20's, 30's, 40's 50s, if they have kids, if they are married, if they are timid, if they are aggressive, if they have working capital, if they have formal education. So I post something generic unless the OP gives more info.

I push insurance work because of the high profit margins, the fact that you get paid before you do the work so you are working with OPM, and because you don't need years in the trades to get into it.

I understand I am going to get push back when I claim you can average 50% net. But it is what it is. In 2002, I was developing 150 single family homes in Miami. No, I was not netting 50% net on that project. I was lucky to do 6% but I was dealing with volume. Valume brings a voluminous amount of problems.

I am in Panama City today which is about 7 hours from my home base doing an insurance claim with 2 men. Why in the world would I do that? Total contract amount, $ 82,000.00. Total job cost including transportation and lodging , 25%. Total days on job, 14.. Why do the job? Because my two helpers are my son and step son in law whom I am teaching the business to. If not for them, I would rather stay at the homestead feeding the chickens.

Net profit, about $ 60,000.00 or $ 4,285.00 per day. That's two employees and my self. And this is a small job.

At 6% net, i would have to do a mil. At 10% net $ 600,000.00. Not to mention the organization i would need to run those jobs, the office space, the equipment, the subs, and the exposure i would have to endless stress and all the employees problems and subs i would have to contend with. Then there's the six months to do the job working 80 hours a week and chasing people for your money. Been there, done that. It sucks.

So I push insurance work not because I am selling something but because I know the opportunities there as I see them every day. Like I said before, as you are driving down the street, its those mitigation and restoration companies that have the new trucks and uniformed employees.

There are countless ways and areas to specialise in this industry. But, like anything else, you have to work at it to learn it.

An older contractor asked me years ago how he could get into it. He was in his mid 50's tired and burned out. I told him that with his years of experience in constrution, he should look into becoming a Cat adjuster. Five years later, he was driving around the country with his wife in a class A motor home. He works with her out of the camper for 6 months and clears a quarter mil in a bad year as a CAT adjuster. Then he spends the next six months visiting his kids around the country wish his class A. Six months later, repeat. No employees, no subs, no warehouse, no equipment to maintain.

Nothing wrong with wearing bags. But at 60, it socks big time. It kills me to see men physicaly working in this industry at old age. When I was doing that 150 home project, I had a guy 72 years old placing concrete forms and another 62 hanging doors and base. My uncle 60 at the time was placing steel. Respect to them all but I was dambed if I was going to be doing that at there age.
 
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