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Attached are some photos of a historic rehabilitation of a canal lock I am the CM on. Quite an amazing project, our stone masons are exceptional.
 

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It's sandstone out of the Roaring Run vein, Grampian PA (Russel Stone). The bed joints are a hot topic right now. That is a mock-up area and the owners aren't happy with the bed joints, it was dismantled today. The stones in those first few courses were measures on the face when dismantled instead of measuring the body of the stone. They will be replacing with correct dimensioned stone.
 

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The color of the mortar is terrible imo.

Use a white mortar with dark aggregate.
Didn't have white mortar in 1824, it's an accurate mixture for this application to replicate the historic mortar. The stones will darken significantly and it will be under water 99% of the time anyway.
 

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Didn't have white mortar in 1824, it's an accurate mixture for this application to replicate the historic mortar. The stones will darken significantly and it will be under water 99% of the time anyway.
You wanna go head to head on this one, really?

but if its under water, w/e :thumbup:
 

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Didn't have white mortar in 1824, it's an accurate mixture for this application to replicate the historic mortar. The stones will darken significantly and it will be under water 99% of the time anyway.


That is all they had in 1824. However,Portland happened to be invented that very year.......in the U.K. The first shipment to States (can be debated ) was not until 1871.
 

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didn't have white mortar in 1824, it's an accurate mixture for this application to replicate the historic mortar. The stones will darken significantly and it will be under water 99% of the time anyway.
i understand what the color of pure lime is, it looks white in dry form. But doesn't dry that way, i assume the guy above is referring to today's tinted white mortar which is not proper for this application, and no portland wasn't used in the original construction of this project, and we absolutely wont use it either, although it was present in a few newer repairs.




That is all they had in 1824. However,portland happened to be invented that very year.......in the u.k. The first shipment to states (can be debated ) was not until 1871.
iii
 

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Didn't have white mortar in 1824, it's an accurate mixture for this application to replicate the historic mortar. The stones will darken significantly and it will be under water 99% of the time anyway.
You wanna go head to head on this one, really?

Just stating the facts so that you have a clear understanding of a historic rehabilitation project. Find another tough
guy if you need a pissing match tonight.
 

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You wanna go head to head on this one, really?

Just stating the facts so that you have a clear understanding of a historic rehabilitation project. Find another tough
guy if you need a pissing match tonight.
Not being a tough guy, your statement was so incorrect I laughed.

But carry on with your grey historic restoration mortar.
 

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Hey we've got something in common, both of us are good for a laugh. That mortar looks like bright buff to me, brick is in surprisingly good condition, if I seen that around here I would know that it wasn't circa1825, not saying that it isn't it is under cover of a porch and maybe a less harsh climate. This mortar here will bleach out nearly the same. It is not even remotely grey. I'll post a pic in a few days after some more curing.
 

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Looks like a very interesting project. I love when people do historical Restoration work with all the original material. Our 100 year old house has had some pointing done with new mortar and looks bad compared to the original but beginning to fail original joints. I follow a couple really good guys from England and Australia who do restoration masonry . Feels like a bit of a lost skill so it's nice to see some people still have the care ( and clearly the passion) to keep it up.

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Hey we've got something in common, both of us are good for a laugh. That mortar looks like bright buff to me, brick is in surprisingly good condition, if I seen that around here I would know that it wasn't circa1825, not saying that it isn't it is under cover of a porch and maybe a less harsh climate. This mortar here will bleach out nearly the same. It is not even remotely grey. I'll post a pic in a few days after some more curing.
You lack an understanding of masonry.
 
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