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Maybe compared to growing the lumber and milling it yourself it seems fast ;)
It was the slowest most time consuming method I've come across. When is installing angle cut blocks ever fast?
It depends on pitch how big of a pain, if you can stand on the bottom cords and put them in its not so bad but climbing on top carrying your gun and blocks and trying to hang on and put em in is a pita
 

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Forming and Framing
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Maybe compared to growing the lumber and milling it yourself it seems fast ;)
It was the slowest most time consuming method I've come across. When is installing angle cut blocks ever fast?
i dunno. but they should all be the same. bang out the cuts and nail.
that can be done by one person while the rest of the crew continues on another part of the building.
 

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Honolulu, Hawaii
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I like full length hips, plate to head, and the monos that hit the guider to have full length top cords that hit the hip. Have you used ones like this Nick? Or the Hat works great too:thumbsup: You know the triangle thingy
 

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We use the drop in purlin system here all the time. It's dead easy and fast. You really don't even need the truss plan to frame it up. Its pretty obvious where all the pieces need to go and they only fit where they should.
 

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The Duke
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Discussion Starter · #26 ·
FramingPro said:
i dunno. but they should all be the same. bang out the cuts and nail.
that can be done by one person while the rest of the crew continues on another part of the building.
Nick, the design I posted requires zero blocking. Why would anyone think doing unnecessary extra work for no reason at all is no big deal?

Besides that, I would much rather have solid, full length members for my roof system than blocking.
 

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FramingPro said:
if i understand right, then you have an 8' bottom cord and then the top cord is either the jack or common length and the trusses below are dropped 3 1/2" for the long rafters to bear on? Wouldn't asking the truss company to cut those with a common difference be too much for some of them.
No- becouse they are the same for every roof, they do layout from the outside corners to center. I asked once if they could make the layout work from one end to the other and they laughed :)
 

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if i understand right, then you have an 8' bottom cord and then the top cord is either the jack or common length and the trusses below are dropped 3 1/2" for the long rafters to bear on? Wouldn't asking the truss company to cut those with a common difference be too much for some of them.
:no: This is what they do. I like the 5/12 pitch we call it the dummy pitch cause each mono jack is 2'2" longer than the last:blink: 2'2"-4'4"-6'6"-8'8":blink:
 

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Dirtywhiteboy said:
:no: This is what they do. I like the 5/12 pitch we call it the dummy pitch cause each mono jack is 2'2" longer than the last:blink: 2'2"-4'4"-6'6"-8'8":blink:
Exactly- layed out from outside corners to center
 

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I'm workin today how bout you Ninja, Nick:blink: Runnin some base around a duplex.
 

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Design Build
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Thanks for posting this, Kent. I am a truss-roof noob. They don't come naturally to me. I have done 8-10 truss roofs versus 250-300 stick framed roofs. Just looking at how trusses are drawn on the roof plan seems 90 degrees out of phase.

I like this thread........its like sitting in on a class.:thumbsup::thumbup:
 

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Rusty Nails said:
The California style is the best of that lineup hands down....
The lay in hip fill is probably easier/ faster. With the California you still have to put in a hip board and straighten it. The lay in is allready straight, you just drop it in and nail it to the step down trusses. Less bracing required in the lay in system as well.
Just my observation.
 

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One of the advantages to the block in method, is that you can just fill in the bottom and start the plywood. Then you can have an area to stage the blocks, gun, etc on the roof deck. With the layover method, it forces you to get all of them set correct top to bottom before any sheathing can begin. I have worked with both of them extensively. I used to prefer the blocks because that was what I started with. Now it really doesn't matter. They both have there advantages/disadvantages.
 

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Warren said:
One of the advantages to the block in method, is that you can just fill in the bottom and start the plywood. Then you can have an area to stage the blocks, gun, etc on the roof deck. With the layover method, it forces you to get all of them set correct top to bottom before any sheathing can begin. I have worked with both of them extensively. I used to prefer the blocks because that was what I started with. Now it really doesn't matter. They both have there advantages/disadvantages.
How do you set them? I flop the lay in down and string or site plane em while someone runs down each truss nailing the lay in down. In other words i set the stepdown trusses with the lay in. It only takes a few minutes.
 
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