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This is for you plumbing pros out there. I have 1/2 inch copper piping that I am trying to put new water supply valves on. How does a novice get a compression fitting right? Is there a "rule" that says you turn the wrench a certain number of times and no more? And is it possible to overtighten the fitting and cause it to leak? I need a "how to" from start to finish. Thanks.
 

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DSVCS said:
This is for you plumbing pros out there. I have 1/2 inch copper piping that I am trying to put new water supply valves on. How does a novice get a compression fitting right? Is there a "rule" that says you turn the wrench a certain number of times and no more? And is it possible to overtighten the fitting and cause it to leak? I need a "how to" from start to finish. Thanks.
I know of no "rule of thumb" but tighten the compression fitting good and tight, then turn the water on a little and tighten until the leak stops. Use two wrenches, one on the nut and one on the fitting so the pipe doesn't twist. Don't use these fittings in an closed in space, only where you can get to it again if required.
 

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DSVCS said:
This is for you plumbing pros out there. I have 1/2 inch copper piping that I am trying to put new water supply valves on. How does a novice get a compression fitting right? Is there a "rule" that says you turn the wrench a certain number of times and no more? And is it possible to overtighten the fitting and cause it to leak? I need a "how to" from start to finish. Thanks.


Minconst is right. There is no rule of thumb. I use those compression fittings all the time when I'm remodeling. I use them temporarily until I install the cabinet or drywall. You definitely need two wrenches to tighten them down though. After all, it is a compressed fitting. When it's tight you'll know it. Just make sure you push the valve all the way so the copper is tightly fastened with valve.

Glasshouse is right as well. The flexible lines are better and easier to install.
 

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I think the poster is just talking about the shut off valves at this point. Using flexible water supply lines from the valves to the faucet should still be an option.

A couple of tips I have learned is if you are replacing an existing valve that had a compression fitting already, to reuse the brass ring insert that goes around the copper pipe. You know that one fit perfectly.

Make sure the copper pipe you are putting the valve on is perfectly round, if not cut it off until you have a good piece of pipe because any crimp or nick in it will reduce your success.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Mike Finley said:
I think the poster is just talking about the shut off valves at this point. Using flexible water supply lines from the valves to the faucet should still be an option.

A couple of tips I have learned is if you are replacing an existing valve that had a compression fitting already, to reuse the brass ring insert that goes around the copper pipe. You know that one fit perfectly.

Make sure the copper pipe you are putting the valve on is perfectly round, if not cut it off until you have a good piece of pipe because any crimp or nick in it will reduce your success.

Thank you for your response. What I am actually doing is replacing the chrome water supply valves and flexible supply lines with polished brass supply valves and rigid supply lines, so everything has compression fittings.
 
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