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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
The wainscoat will be red oak. Contractor has 1/4 inch paneling with 1 x4, 6 inch colonial crown,and base cap to go on the inside. The walls are curved . One is convex and the other is concave.

My thought is to build a jig to mimic the walls and then clamp and bend material to the proper shape. I'm not even sure if I can do this with crown.

Has anyone ever done this before ? If so, what is the best way to make red oak 1x material and crown bend ? Below are the best photos I can upload of material and walls.

Thank you for any input.
 

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It would help to know the radius you want to bent it to?Whay build a jig?If it will bend around the jig it will bend around the wall..Bset bet is to make shallow kerfs in the panels and base.Crown is a different story.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I'm thinking that I can clamp the matetial and wet it down to bend it. I know that is probably not feasible, but I have never encountered this before. That is why I am asking for ideas.

Thought about relief cuts, but that will not work with the crown , baseboard, or any other part exposed.
 

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section the material then glue up/laminate in place, or on a jig?

That would me my choice, even though it will change the profile. Perhaps a bandsaw would minimize lost material. Or mill things up from seperate stock to replicate the profile when it's pieced together.

Second thought would be steam bending. But if you're like me you'd say you aren't a shipwright.

The flat stock might be do able in terms of bending to fit. At the same time could be a nightmare.
 

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I have used a banding machine to do a tighter radius than that.
Just like the metal bands on a lift of lumber.
Convex should be easier .
Make a lot of kerfs in the back..
Also take two pieces of crown, cut them into strips, taking one strip from the second piece to replace the saw kerf that is missing..
Good luck hope this helps.
 

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Mill work company I used to work for would make all the curved molding in their shop. They would come out and measure the radius. Typically they would laminate layers to the radius then cut the pieces on a spindle shaper with the proper profile.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Thanks for the responses. The last time I saw something like this a mill shop bent the material to the walls radius.

Still would love to hear any other ideas that anyone might have.
 

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You might get the flat stock to bend, but no way will the oak crown bend. That has to be done in three or four layers, and glued up at install over solid backing. It's a major job!

You will probably end up having custom milled crown to the needed radius, in multiple layers.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Can you provide more detail. Do you have a mock up of the wainscoting? How high are the ceilings how far away will you be when you view them and what does the wall termination look like

The job is a little over 30 minutes away, and is not a rush job. I didn't get past the initial inspection of the job. In other words, I haven't accepted it.

I took a look at your website and would love to spend some time working with you guys. I never see stairs of that caliber done here. Stairbuilding is such a lost art in Louisiana. Really, all trim work has gone to crap down here.

I'm doing the best I can to change that for my customers.
 

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True laminated solid wood stained curved wainscot is a real premium for price. Figure it out like it was straight and then multiply by at least 5x. If it's going up a stairs 10x
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
True laminated solid wood stained curved wainscot is a real premium for price. Figure it out like it was straight and then multiply by at least 5x. If it's going up a stairs 10x
If I accept it, it will be by the hour. Contractor texted me earlier and said that he found stainable flex crown. Never heard of that before.
 

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The last three posts have given you very good advice. This is a much more difficult job than it first appears if it's going to be truly stain grade. As mentioned the crown is going to be the hardest part to do. If the contractor has supplied you were solid straight crown and then decides that he wants flexible molding, you're in Deepwater. He most likely has no idea how much time it's going to take, you should have a real clear understanding with him before you begin the job.
 
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