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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
We've got a house that has a section of cooper standing seam roof (over the entry). We're having trouble with snow slides and ice build-up.

We're considering Alpine Snow Guards http://www.alpinesnowguards.com/ Any experience, thoughts, words of wisdom, other suggestions?

You can see whats happening to the gutters.
 

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Lack Of All Trades
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A thicker metal gutter is in order with several more straps placed 12-inches apart is in order. With the roof's slope and the fact that it is metal makes snow shoot down the roof onto the gutter and on someone's head. OOps. Sorry.

Those snow guards do look promising; however, ugly.

On the positive side: Those metal roofs last forever!
 

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Project Superintendent
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Architects starting specifying those around here a few years ago. I have installed them on several commercial buildings, but we haven't had enough snow the last few years to see how they perform. They aren't that ugly though, barely noticeable.
 

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I know most of the time that the snow there doesn't stay around too long.
Does anyone in that area have problems with ice dams?

On a local building with metal roof and gutters,once the snow guards were installed,they had problems with back up.
Snow melted into the gutters,froze and then backed up under the metal into the building.
You may want to get a few local opinions.
 

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gutter should be locked into a full apron,and hung low
looks like some panels are sliding down,check with the snow guard manufacturer on type and location for the guards and how may rows you need

you have to remember the snow guards rely on the panels to be fastened properly
 

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Sure, I can do that...
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I can't say that I have used that particular brand, but I have installed similar snow stops that look quite a bit like those.
They MUST be screwed into the truss system. Screwing into the roof decking doesn't cut it.

*edit*
at least around here.
 

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copper magnet
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If it's just that area over the entry that's of concern, I'd look into the individual guards that attach to the roof seams rather the snow rail type. I typically use Berger's, but Alpine makes a similar unit.

The snow rails work great, but make quite a visual impact. The individual guards don't stand out quite so much.

Side Note: If that gutter had been installed correctly or with a little over kill on the gutter hangers, it would have held quite a few inches of snow from that small roof plane.

and

What's up with the bottom of that roof?
 

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If it's just that area over the entry that's of concern, I'd look into the individual guards that attach to the roof seams rather the snow rail type. I typically use Berger's, but Alpine makes a similar unit.

The snow rails work great, but make quite a visual impact. The individual guards don't stand out quite so much.

Side Note: If that gutter had been installed correctly or with a little over kill on the gutter hangers, it would have held quite a few inches of snow from that small roof plane.

and

What's up with the bottom of that roof?
Hey, I saw that too.

My first test post here...Hi every one.:thumbsup:
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Architects starting specifying those around here a few years ago. I have installed them on several commercial buildings, but we haven't had enough snow the last few years to see how they perform. They aren't that ugly though, barely noticeable.
mud, You have installed the Alpine product?
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
I know most of the time that the snow there doesn't stay around too long.
Does anyone in that area have problems with ice dams?

On a local building with metal roof and gutters,once the snow guards were installed,they had problems with back up.
Snow melted into the gutters,froze and then backed up under the metal into the building.
You may want to get a few local opinions.
It's not real ice damming. Snows at night - sunny and 45 next day - creates a layer of ice under the snow - then when it gets heavy enough - get the F*&% out of the way - Gutter and all.

Or it distorts the gutter so it will not run - gets blocked and freezes the next night.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
gutter should be locked into a full apron,and hung low
looks like some panels are sliding down,check with the snow guard manufacturer on type and location for the guards and how may rows you need

you have to remember the snow guards rely on the panels to be fastened properly
The Alpine system gets locked on the standing seam with a set screw. I think we would need to drive the connectors back up - crimp - and set the set screw.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
If it's just that area over the entry that's of concern, I'd look into the individual guards that attach to the roof seams rather the snow rail type. I typically use Berger's, but Alpine makes a similar unit.

The snow rails work great, but make quite a visual impact. The individual guards don't stand out quite so much.

Side Note: If that gutter had been installed correctly or with a little over kill on the gutter hangers, it would have held quite a few inches of snow from that small roof plane.

and

What's up with the bottom of that roof?
The individual guards will leave 16" of slide area - we like the idea but worry that it will not solve the prob. But I am listening (reading).:laughing:
 
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