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Hey guys,

I have a painting job I need to bid on. 21' x 16' room, all walls have built-ins floor to ceilings. Customer is looking for a flat price. Any ideas? Thanks.
 

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I wouldn't use flat, except for ceilings: it really doesn't wash well.

Price out something else.

Good luck
 

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It's really hard to put the lowball in town out of business. He only needs to make enough to buy another bottle of MD 20/20. You just need to be a bit thirstier.
 

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$1.29.
 

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Hey guys,

I have a painting job I need to bid on. 21' x 16' room, all walls have built-ins floor to ceilings. Customer is looking for a flat price. Any ideas? Thanks.
If by "flat price" you mean fixed price, that's one thing. If you mean "flat" price to mean flat paint, that's another...

Assuming you mean fixed price contract...

You have to determine what your hourly rate is first. The hourly rate is generally a combination of Labor (which includes what you pay yourself and any helper) and Overhead divided by 2080 hours (assuming you are working an average 40 hour week - adjust accordingly).

You then have to calculate what the Materials will cost if you are providing them. Lastly, you have to add a Profit percentage on top of this (Labor, Overhead and Materials), and this is different from company to company. Profit is NOT what you pay yourself at the end of the job after everything has been paid, but what you pay your COMPANY, which goes to capital reserves, emergency fund, equipment purchases, growth, etc.

L - Labor (what you pay yourself and helper plus loaded costs - taxes, retirement, benefits, etc.)
O - Overhead (what it costs to run your business - insurance, WC, cell, electric, gas, advertising, office, vehicle maintenance, etc.)
M - Materials
P - Profit

You will find in the painting arena that unless you are very good and can specialize, it is a hard arena because after you calculate what you want to make and include all your overhead, materials and profit, you will quickly find that the average painter needs to make in the area of $400-$600/day, and that does not include materials.

This is one of the reasons why so many start and stop a painting business. I am not discouraging you from wanting to run a painting business, but you are going to need to specialize and set yourself apart from all the other guys who have no idea on how to price and shoot themselves in the foot with "$75 - $100 room" specials, not realizing one of two things are happening... they are not making anywhere near what they need to make to support themselves or their family or that they are literally paying customers for work not the other way around...

When calculating how many hours you think it will take, I would encourage you to multiply whatever number you come up with by a factor of 1.25 (for example, you guesstimate 4 hours x 1.25 = 5 hours) until you have a strong handle on your numbers...

Run the above numbers... per-requisite to being a business owner... If you can't or won't do that, it's just a matter of time...

Best of Luck... 8^)
 

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Thank you for posting on ContractorTalk.com. Straight pricing questions are frowned upon here, as are 'Going Rate' questions. If you are a contractor seeking advice regarding your pricing structure, the Moderators of this forum would like to direct you to this thread: "Pricing, Estimating and Success".

ContractorTalk.com is designed for professional contractors to discuss issues and topics related to the construction and remodeling industries.

We apologize for any inconvenience that this may have caused.
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