Contractor Talk - Professional Construction and Remodeling Forum banner
1 - 20 of 25 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
82 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Ok so I usually stay out of this area of the forum since I really don't know what I'm doing, with the exception of irrigation.
I figured I'd stop by and ask you pro's a few questions though. My grass is not very full and it has some brown lines in it for a lack of a better description. It got aerated and over seeded in the fall, and then fertilizer/weed "control" in the spring. Lawn gets watered daily and is kept cut around 3". I'm determined to have the greenest lawn on the street and obviously its not working


Part of the grass


Bad spot


Any hep appreciated.
 

·
KemoSabe
Joined
·
14,233 Posts
You need to give some specific details.
What variety of grasses was sewn?
When did the problem arise?
Do you have pets?
Is it possible that construction debris got buried in the yard?
Is the soil more sandy in the area of bad grass?
How thick is the layer of topsoil in the problem areas?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
82 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I'm sorry for the lack of info guys. That grass is a mixture of tall fescues. The yard has had grass in it for years, but the "lawn" is only a couple years old. With that the grass has never been full, but to me it looks more brown than it had looked last year. I didn't actually notice when it occurred, but it was more brown come this spring than the past years, but the past years did have some brown grass in there as well. I do have a dog, but he is only in one section of the yard and the problem persists throughout the whole yard. It is possibly that there are construction debries buried, but if there is they have been there for approx 20-30 years. The soil is very sandy in this area, and seems to be rather hard (for lack of better term) judging from what ive had to dig. I have not been able to get a soil test done yet. There is mushrooms growing but that appears to be a good thing from research. I also see that brown patch is common among the tall fescues from what I can see with research.
 

·
Lack Of All Trades
Joined
·
1,232 Posts
Either over-fertilized or under watered is my under-educated guess..

I was a landscaper for about 7 years when I was younger. I would love to see another pic of the bad part and the good part relative to each other in a set back view to better judge what is going on..

could be grubs..I dunno..
 

·
KemoSabe
Joined
·
14,233 Posts
Different fungi have been problematic in my lawn in South Jersey.
Also acidic soil has been a problem.
I think the recommendation for a soil test is dead nut your first coarse of action. Fertilization will be of little benefit if the soil is not suitable.
A beautiful lawn is very satisfying and very labor intensive when you're trying to repair a damaged area.:thumbsup:
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
846 Posts
Hey Charlie, I don't know if you do your own testing or not but check out that site for supplies. They have some great kits and soil analysis is a good add-on for a landscaper. I use like $8 worth of material to do a test and charge $200. You can analyze a near acre size lawn in about an hour. HO's love it.
 

·
Crash Test Dummy
Joined
·
2,210 Posts
Hey Charlie, I don't know if you do your own testing or not but check out that site for supplies. They have some great kits and soil analysis is a good add-on for a landscaper. I use like $8 worth of material to do a test and charge $200. You can analyze a near acre size lawn in about an hour. HO's love it.

I just bag it and send it the University.

$10 for a complete analysis. I charge the HO $30.

I'm going to have to reconsider my methods....Thanks.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
846 Posts
I use it as a sales tool. Do the analysis on site, show them the conditions when they're in a buying mood. Start with a $200 analysis, then you're selling them an annual fertilization program for $1500, a herbicide program for $950, and a mowing contract good for $75/week. Once you get the mowing contract sold then sell em an overseeding for $475, and an aeration for $650.

In my experience it's a great sales tool. It's pretty easy to learn how to use the kit, but it impresses the HO. Makes me look knowledgeable, competent, and worth the money. I bought the kit, a few books, checked out some more from the library, practiced over a weekend and hit the ground running. It's not hard.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
1,539 Posts
Ya i believe the University of Illinois at urbana will do a soil test if you send it to them. I think i heard they charge 35. To the original poster once you get the test done then these guys can tell you the proper fertilizer to put on the lawn. The bags that have the numbers on them.
 

·
Vagitarian
Joined
·
3,589 Posts
Looks like you have a fungus called "Red Thread". It is a disease that is common in the summer months. You can try fertilizing it, but you need to apply a fungicide. Scott's makes a good product in a orange bag. I am not sure, but I heard that they no longer can sell it to the public, but only commerically. So, if you wish, you may have to call a pro to have it sprayed for red thread.
 

·
Custom Stuff
Joined
·
867 Posts
Have you had any treatments for lawn pests done or had any inspections done? Most areas now grubs are getting closer to the surface and sod web worms are also prevalent. It does look more like a fungus of some sort, though and if it all over the yard, your mower is helping to spread it. If it is a fungus and you treat it, clean and treat your mower also.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
82 Posts
Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Watered daily? The others can correct me if I am wrong, but shouldn't it be watered for longer periods of time - 2 to 3 times a week & early in the AM (just before the sun comes out)
I believe you're right, that watering in large quantities 2-3 times per week encourages deep root growth. But it seems everyone around here is watering 15-20 minutes daily.
 
1 - 20 of 25 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top