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FT Paint
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey guys, I could really use a bit a guidance here as I'm taking on more than I've done in the past.

I will be doing all the priming and painting (ceilings, walls, trim, etc.) for a brand new residential house. All walls are going in 1 color. The drywall is 90% done now and we will get in before the flooring is installed. The house is huge. Don't have the exact square footage but picture 8 rooms per floor

If one of you could be so kind to provide me with a general rundown of how you'd tackle this project:

- Since there is no flooring should I use a sprayer? I assume I should at least spray on all the primer.

- I haven't sprayed before, how do you create a ceiling cut line with a sprayer? I'm guessing lots of tape and sheets?

- What type of primer would ensure that the walls don't suck up all the finish paint and run my costs up. Do you use more than one coat of primer?

If you have any tips or a general layout of your process for this type of job it would be greatly appreciated. Worst case I could brush and roller it all but I'm worried that will be very costly vs spraying or other techniques. I should have a crew of 4-5 men, thanks!!
 

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how did you bid the job without knowing the square footage? How much paint are you going to buy without knowing the square footage?

Listen, I will throw you a bone. Spray and backroll the primer. Spray and backroll the ceilings. cut and roll everything else.

How did you sell a job without knowing the square footage?
 

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FT Paint
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
This isn't a joke. I've been on the jobsite twice, went through room by room. I know how much paint I need, that's not the issue.

Thanks NAV, I googled the spray and backrolling method. makes sense that the finish wall coat should be done by cut and roll.

I know you guys will roll your eyes but since my jobs are typically small interior repaints I've rarely had to consider square footage, I estimate the gallons as I walk through and I'm right 99% of the time.

The baseboards will be attatched and again there is no flooring, would it be wise to spray all the baseboards before doing the finish coat on the walls?
 

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You can do the ceiling cut line with a shield... why wouldn't you spray and backroll the walls also? as far as the trim i'd brush it unless you're not good at straight lines... then spray and cut in the walls
 

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Smart phone? Scan me!
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How many thousands were you under the guys that do this all the time and could turn it out? Man. You copied and pasted it word from word from Painttalk. Got the thread shut down, come over here now? God I am pulled apart on this... In one hand want to help, the other.. there are alot of people who do this for a living in this size of project and need the work and you are the one that got it. You don't even know enough to know how to correctly systematize the process to do what for what, NOR what to use.

You a homeowner???????
 

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FT Paint
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
How many thousands were you under the guys that do this all the time and could turn it out? Man. You copied and pasted it word from word from Painttalk. Got the thread shut down, come over here now? God I am pulled apart on this... In one hand want to help, the other.. there are alot of people who do this for a living in this size of project and need the work and you are the one that got it. You don't even know enough to know how to correctly systematize the process to do what for what, NOR what to use.

You a homeowner???????

I'm not here to offend people, sorry. I actually made the thread here first and figured I'd get more helpful responses if I posted it in a few other spots too...

Whats so terrible about me getting the job? Why don't I need the work? This is my living and I have bills to pay aswell. Everyone has to start somewhere right? This is just my first big job and I was hoping for helpful responses, I thought thats what this forum was for?


Thanks camilo, I've always done all cutting by hand so I've never looked into shields.

ps. incase this has made anyone else mad I am not charging pennies for this job and I always deliver premium quality. The customer will be very happy with their house, I'm just here to discuss ways to make such a large scale project go faster and more efficiently. Thanks.
 

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Using a sprayer for the first time on a NC home is a big leap. Spraying takes practice and skill to do right. Some guys practice on scraps, barns, sheds before doing interior.
Are you really aware of the level of prep involved?
Your rates of coverage will vary, do you even know tip sizes to use?
If you have 4-5 men you would be better off to brush and roll, although I hope you priced it for that. I have 3 guys that can prep and paint a 2500 sq foot home in a few days, all spraywork.
It sounds to me you are doing the homeowner a disservice by practicing on his home.
 

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My first job that I used a sprayer on I brought a guy in that has about 35 yrs experience. It was going to be a one time deal so I could learn how to use a my rig. But we liked working together and are now doing our 4th job together. So my advice is to hire someone that can run a sprayer. You'll learn, it'll cut into your profit a little more, but you'll probably save money because you won't screw something up.
 

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I would use the nice sheets the cheap ones don't do as well...:thumbup:
:laughing: I couldnt help but laugh.

Only thing I can say is if you have never used a sprayer before, tackling a large house like you described will likely be a disaster. I agree with the person that recommended you to hire someone who has experience with it.
 

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To give an alternate opinion only because it worked for me: I'd say it depends on the person, what they are doing, and how quick they get through the learning curve. I've had "experienced" painters, guys that have been in business for anywhere from 10 to 45 years, massacre cabinets I have built and trim I've installed. I had enough after one painter ruined a kitchen cabinet set and desk I built, then a few months later had a bathroom vanity ruined by another. I couldn't take anymore chances so I got set-up to spray my own work and have been doing it for years now. Practiced on some scraps, did a lot of reading on spraying, and I've never messed up my work yet. **Disclaimer: There are some things though that I know better than to get into and I don't have experience doing anything and everything to do with spraying.
 

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Thom
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you will have an easier go of it if you spray, prime and paint, prior to the installation of any doors or trim. Mask off the windows, exterior doors, and go.

You've got a lot to learn on one job, taking a chance at screwing up the trim is just one more potential issue.

Prime and paint the base before it's installed, it will need another coat after installation. Prime and paint the door jambs and casing after installation. You can spray the base prior to install but all the trim that's installed should be brushed.
 

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Particulate Filter
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I agree with others on here who said that you are putting a lot of risk on the owners of the property you're going to be working on by practicing on their home.

That being said, I'm self taught in all of the trades I work in because I started in construction in my thirties and didn't have time to work for $10 an hour so I could learn from someone else while making them money.

If you want to make money for yourself you have to be willing to -

1. Learn how to learn. In other words, find resources of information and use them to anticipate problems and solve them if they occur despite your best efforts. (You're already doing this by participating in this forum).

2. Take intelligent risks. Know when the timing is right to take the plunge into a new area. I think most people on here think your timing is wrong. You should practice spraying on your own home or on rentals, not new construction.

3. Be ready to pay the piper if you mess one up. Don't make excuses when you miff one. Own up to it and pay for your mistakes with hard work, extra materials, money and if need be insurance claims. If you don't have the resources to cover your bet (that the work will satisfy the client) you're a hack! That's why they call them hacks. They cut up the house and then can't put it back together.
 

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Nest Home Improvement
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I agree with most of what has been said already. The way I have seen it done that seems to work is spray priming everything first. Second, spray all the interior doors, trim and baseboard over spraying onto the walls and not worrying about masking anything except the door hinges (door knobs are removed). Third, spray all the ceilings, over spraying onto the walls where the ceilings and walls meet. Lastly, using a metal shield to mask the areas already painted and spray all the walls.

Good luck to you.
 

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FT Paint
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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Thanks for the helpful replies. I've decided to only go with 3 people for the crew, one of them is a painter who has experience with a sprayer for interior work. He should be a valuable resource.

I estimated the job assuming that worst case I just brush and roll everything. What are the big time mistakes that can happen with spraying, like posters above said I know to tape and cover EVERYTHING that I don't want hit by paint, but how do I damage the house or screw it up? as long as i'm spraying from the right distance it should never damage drywall right??


What are the major time and resource consuming problems that come out of spraying? A few of you talked about how i'll be ruining the customers home beyond repair... I'm a little confused. Theres no flooring and I'm going to tape and sheet everything necessary. Thanks
 

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Great idea to have an experienced sprayman. There can be several pitfalls.
Like this
Applying primer/paint too thin/thick/uneven
Not boxing all the paint before you start
Underestimating the time and caulk/putty for prep
Is the house heated? Issues if cold walls or temp fluctuations.
You can spend a lot of time masking if you are not experienced, do you have a masking machine?
This may give you a little more insight.
 

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Well that's good you got a guy who can spray, there are a lot of things like spraying and the paint runs or sags and then areas that are light and the drywall isn't sealed, this will cause the drywall to suck your finish paint and you will end up with holidays or flashing to take place. overspray that goes out the windows and it ends up on the exterior:whistling that's the one I like:laughing:
But if you have 3-4 man crew they should have that whole house(3,850sqft) primed out in one 8 hour day. Been there done that, and we rolled it, then come back cut in the latex primer, Then we would oil under coat all wood trim, any time I have used a sprayer on the interior it's do to shelfing and doors, everything was brush and roll. Spraying IMO is for exrterior work and I have seen some exterior work by other guys that I just :laughing: at.
If you want to learn on this job spray the closets and see how you do, let your spray guy do the main rooms and make sure you back roll everything you spray or back brush the trim of overspray.
But I do have to say there are New Construction guys sitting that do these jobs, But I also understand where your coming from, I have lost about 6 jobs to guys like yourself just coming into my line of work. I mainly do all repair work. Good luck

RC Great Video:thumbsup:
 

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I agree with others on here who said that you are putting a lot of risk on the owners of the property you're going to be working on by practicing on their home.

That being said, I'm self taught in all of the trades I work in because I started in construction in my thirties and didn't have time to work for $10 an hour so I could learn from someone else while making them money.

If you want to make money for yourself you have to be willing to -

1. Learn how to learn. In other words, find resources of information and use them to anticipate problems and solve them if they occur despite your best efforts. (You're already doing this by participating in this forum).

2. Take intelligent risks. Know when the timing is right to take the plunge into a new area. I think most people on here think your timing is wrong. You should practice spraying on your own home or on rentals, not new construction.

3. Be ready to pay the piper if you mess one up. Don't make excuses when you miff one. Own up to it and pay for your mistakes with hard work, extra materials, money and if need be insurance claims. If you don't have the resources to cover your bet (that the work will satisfy the client) you're a hack! That's why they call them hacks. They cut up the house and then can't put it back together.

Exactly, good responce.

Glad you picked up an experienced spray man. Will be a good chance for you to observe.
 

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in mississippi this is how we do it go in prep all trim one day next morning cover just interior brick ,tubs and any stain grade ext doors we dont cover windows never need too then same day i spray all walls first then switch over to ceiling paint and spray one coat we never backroll next day spray white laquer sand next day next clean up and spray oil for finish next day run ceilings and paint windows and ext door casings next day point walls up and brush and roll finish come back and brush baseboard and your done except touch up down here we get about six to seven dollars a foot average house is 4000 sq ft do the job in 2 weeks with 4 guys
 
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