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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I just got done staining a red oak floor with a dark stain (my first time using stain)
Before I stained I ran the OBS 18 with 120 grit paper mostly running the machine with the grain, except the last few rows where my back hit the wall I ran the machine perpendicular to the boards, and well it shows up like a sore thumb, 3 obvious rows coming through the stain looks like the outside of the machine left 3 inch rows.

Can I hand sand out and re stain? Is there a trick to getting a blend? What should I do? re-staining the floor is out of the question everything else looks great. I thought you could run this machine any direction but boy did that turn out to be a mistake. Any help thanks.
 

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Welcome----this question might get a better answer next door at DIY Chatroom--DIY Chatroom - DIY Home Improvement Forum

This forum is for contractors---However,If you are one--perhaps you could tell us a bit about your trade and how you came to be staining a floor for the first time?

FYI---usually the floor is screened after sanding to even out the sanding marks left by the edger and drum sander---Mike----
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Well I'm a general contractor who does a little bit of everything but I had no idea what I was getting into by refinishing a floor with a dark stain, I've done a few with polyurethane no problem but dark stains show everything. After stripping these floors twice and now in the hole $1500 I thought I had them perfect except I ran the screening machine with 120 grit paper perpendicular on a few passes and even though the machine was a ROS type sander it created marks that somehow showed through the stain. You couldn't pay me enough to try this ever again but I'm so in the hole I need to fix it as best I can and move on. I was thinking of hand sanding out the small rows and trying to blend in new stain?
 

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I just got done staining a red oak floor with a dark stain (my first time using stain)
Before I stained I ran the OBS 18 with 120 grit paper mostly running the machine with the grain, except the last few rows where my back hit the wall I ran the machine perpendicular to the boards, and well it shows up like a sore thumb, 3 obvious rows coming through the stain looks like the outside of the machine left 3 inch rows.

Can I hand sand out and re stain? Is there a trick to getting a blend? What should I do? re-staining the floor is out of the question everything else looks great. I thought you could run this machine any direction but boy did that turn out to be a mistake. Any help thanks.

you can hand prep with a rougher grit..use the grit you finished your sanding with..reapply the stain..let it tack a little..then wipe it away..


fixing the stain before the finish goes on is crucial..it is more difficult after the fact.

Disclaimer: this is for informational purposes only and a the info provided does not constitute a client /professional relationship or contract*
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Where your back hit the wall??


next time run the machine left to right side to side with the grain..not back and forth..
That bit of advice would have saved me a lot of trouble, I even heard one pro floor guy say not to use a screening machine on dark stained floors leaves too many scratches. Try getting this kind of advice from the "never short of advice, expertly, authoritative" Home Depot rental department. Home Depot must be destroying 100's if not thousands of floors daily (good for the pro floor refinisher guys though)
I haven't polyurethaned yet so hopefully I can save the floors.

Thanks for any and all input.
 

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Here is some advise for staining a floor perfectly.. The progression I have found to work great is.. Drum sand w/ 50 grit, edge with 50 grit, edge again with 80 grit, drum with 80, palm sand all areas that were edged with 60 grit, buff the floor with 100 paper disc, buff again with 120 screen .. Then wipe the floor down with water "water popping", let dry and apply stain using a buffer. Use one white pad to apply the stain and one to wipe it. I like to work in about 5' sections. Buffing the stain gets it really even.. Hope this helps on the next one.. As for this one it unfortunately probably has to be redone completely.
 

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Not necessarily true..the job may not need to be redone..but pictures would help making that assertion.

the stain can be fixed and evened out as long as its not a total abortion.

after he makes the correction with hand prep..if still not looking completely right, he can add a second coat to help bring it together.

let it dry a couple days then begin coating.

the only issue is sometimes you spend alot of time di ckin around when it would be faster to just re do the job.

that decision cant be made from the net..
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Not necessarily true..the job may not need to be redone..but pictures would help making that assertion.

the stain can be fixed and evened out as long as its not a total abortion.

after he makes the correction with hand prep..if still not looking completely right, he can add a second coat to help bring it together.

let it dry a couple days then begin coating.

the only issue is sometimes you spend alot of time di ckin around when it would be faster to just re do the job.

that decision cant be made from the net..
Don't have pictures but basically it's about 800 sq feet of red oak flooring and near one of the walls starting about 4 feet out are '3' 3inch rows that look like the 120 grit sand paper must have polished the floor a little more unevenly. Maybe the machine had wood dust on the bottom of the square pad that caused the rows?
 

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Don't have pictures but basically it's about 800 sq feet of red oak flooring and near one of the walls starting about 4 feet out are '3' 3inch rows that look like the 120 grit sand paper must have polished the floor a little more unevenly. Maybe the machine had wood dust on the bottom of the square pad that caused the rows?

You got your work cut out for you. sounds like it wasn't making full contact..probably due waves in the flooring.

probably better off using the OBS again..this time with the grain and a rougher grit..say 60-80..remove the marking and some stain and reapply.

I can't say how this going to turn out for you as you are obviously not proficient at this.

but after thins, if it still looks a little uneven it will be in your best interest to stain the job again and apply it in a manner that allows tyou to even and mask things..

you will need to let the stain dry a few day before proceeding.

Good luck with it.. hope next time you give it to a pro
 

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Also will a satin poly help hide the color variations or make it worse?
poly wont help it..

however you can get a universal tint for poly and try that..again..not inn your best interest..clear poly wont help nothing.

you cant get it online..

you can get a trans tint for waterbase finish or a universal tint for an oil based.

http://www.woodcraft.com/category/5/1002133/2005522/MIXOL Universal Tints.aspx

this may help but first work on the stain then go to this if needed
 

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I wouldn't screen with 120 doing a dark floor. You wind up burnishing the wood and it doesn't take the stain evenly. Believe it or not, the simplest way to get good results is to not screen at all. Just hand sand all the walls. It's a pain in the ass, but it works.
 

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If this is for a client, your best bet would be to suck it up and call a real HW guy to fix it. If you think you're in a hole now, wait until it's poly'd, looks like ass, and the HO is PO'd.

JM2C (Actually more like a dime).
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Then again, I've never done a whole job with a jitterbug either.
Actually I started with a drum sander up to 80 grit and did the walls by hand, towards the very end I used the "jitterbug" with 120 paper and thats when everything screwed up. I agree if I ever tried it again I wouldn't use an ros at all.

So now I stripped all the stain off with the OBS 18 careful to go with the grain, but at the edges of the wall I had to go perpendicular with the grain just to move the machine to the next row, problem is that will show through the stain. Should I hand sand out along the wall?
 

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Here is some advise for staining a floor perfectly.. The progression I have found to work great is.. Drum sand w/ 50 grit, edge with 50 grit, edge again with 80 grit, drum with 80, palm sand all areas that were edged with 60 grit, buff the floor with 100 paper disc, buff again with 120 screen .. Then wipe the floor down with water "water popping", let dry and apply stain using a buffer. Use one white pad to apply the stain and one to wipe it. I like to work in about 5' sections. Buffing the stain gets it really even.. Hope this helps on the next one.. As for this one it unfortunately probably has to be redone completely.
Very very similar to my progression. On the second edge I like to edge over the drum instead of drum over the edge to avoid the ledge effect from the drum.

For the record most floors we do are 40 drum, edge 36, fill, 80 drum edge 80, 80 disc 120 grit screen palm perimeter for residential work and stain grade jobs.
 
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