Contractor Talk - Professional Construction and Remodeling Forum banner

1 - 14 of 14 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
11 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Just wondering if someone out there can help me. I have been a Carpenter for 10 years now, 4 of them being self employed. I have decided that for financial reasons (especially with the benefits issue) that I am better off being employed, than being self employed. I interviewed with a company today looking for somebody to fill a position as a laborer/supervisor/scheduler. The company has a very good outlook for the future as far as growing very large. The problem is that they asked me to think about my salary requirements....but I have never been offered a position like this, so I do not know what kind of salary is good for this kind of position. Assume that this company will not offer any benifits at this time until they get larger (at least a year). And Iwill be treated as a sub (for at least one year) until they hire me on as payroll. So I need to take that into consideration. I would be working 40-50 hour weeks steady. Any info. will help. Thanks
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,265 Posts
In what geographic market will you be working?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
PipeGuy said:
In what geographic market will you be working?
I will be working in a suburb of Cleveland, Ohio. Residential/New construction $2-300,000 homes in a new development.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,265 Posts
RMiller said:
I will be working in a suburb of Cleveland, Ohio. Residential/New construction $2-300,000 homes in a new development.
how many houses will you be supervising at any one time?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
PipeGuy said:
how many houses will you be supervising at any one time?
There will be one after another, so I am guessing I will be supervising quite a few at any given time. I will be making sure all the subs will be there when they are suppose to be, and they are doing what they are suppose to do, and doing it right.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,573 Posts
Mike Finley said:
Show me anybody who has been self-employed then thinks working for somebody else is a better deal financially and I will show you somebody that doesn't know how to value his work and his worth and never knew how to sell himself to his customers, now you are making the same mistake not knowing how to sell yourself to your employer.
I agree Mike, I just didn't want to be the first one to say it ;)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
You are right, I cannot determine my value in that position. I have never had a position like that offered to me. So I don't even know what a person with a position like this could make.
Ohio, right now has the highest amount of forclosures in the country, Cleveland Ohio, right now has the highest poverty rate in the U.S. (THAT IS WHAT MY LOCAL NEWS SAID.) So obviously I am in a hard state to stay busy in the buisness.
o.k, and mabye I am a little sick of chasing my next job, chasing the money from the last. So I think I might be better off letting somebody else do all of that. Health insurance.... another issue for me and everyone else in this country.... I feel I would be better off letting a employer pay almost $800.00 a month for that.
And as far as selling myself, I do not feel that is an issue. The jobs that I do get being self employed (the few that are in this city) I have landed every one of them. There is just not alot of them around here. Moving out of state is not an option at the moment... and believe me I am going to move to a state where there is more than 3 months of nice weather. Nobody wants there house torn apart and remodeled in the middle of winter, or these ********************ty rainey seasons. So until then, I have an opportunity with a growing company that is very appealing.
I am able to negotiate with this possible employer. When I talked with him, he explained about the company to me, and said (now that you know the facts about our company, and about the position we have open, I want you to go home and think about your salary requirements and let me know in a couple of days....then we will see if you are a possible fit to grow with our company.) I liked the approach he took. It seemed like he was looking for someone to join the company long term without any regrets in the future. Not just someone to hire on until it was time for benefits to kick in, then ditch them (like I have seen alot of in this field) Thanks for the input. Oh yeah, and just the idea of having steady work is a plus, Don't you think?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,265 Posts
Wonderfully insightful comments Mike - all dead-on.
RMiller, it's impossible to negotiate a wage effectively if you don't have a conviction about what you are worth and when it's time to walk away. You've got to decide where thode points are and then start negotiating well above them. I can't imagine this potential employer accepting ANY number you start with, no matter how low. In fact, if it's too low it might well hurt your chances of getting the job.
Over the years I've been astonished on a number of occasions to discover how far I've underestimated the value of my skills and experience. Remember that's it's very difficult to get the bar back up once it's been lowered.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
PipeGuy said:
Wonderfully insightful comments Mike - all dead-on.
RMiller, it's impossible to negotiate a wage effectively if you don't have a conviction about what you are worth and when it's time to walk away. You've got to decide where thode points are and then start negotiating well above them. I can't imagine this potential employer accepting ANY number you start with, no matter how low. In fact, if it's too low it might well hurt your chances of getting the job.
Over the years I've been astonished on a number of occasions to discover how far I've underestimated the value of my skills and experience. Remember that's it's very difficult to get the bar back up once it's been lowered.
Thank you very much PIPEGUY, and MIKE FINLEY. Your insight was very helpful, and honest. Thanks!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
25 Posts
Hope I am not to late on this, but anyway.................
"Man Know Thyself"
What Finley and pipe said is so dead on. You may not know what someone in this position may make but you know what it is worth to you, and dont short change yourself cause you can remember how terrible it was when you underbid that one job and got in the middle of it and had to finish it whether you made money or not.
Napoleon Hill wrote about a guy who was offered a job and the boss told him
"We will pay you all you are worth, after we try you out for a week" the applicant responded "I will not accept it, because I am getting more than that where I am now".

I know, its deep, but think about it.....Know your worth.

Also, if its not to late, read Guerilla Negotiating, you will be inspired to get what you want.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,471 Posts
When I freelance engineering jobs, I always look at what I charge as a percentage of the overall project including future profits.
Did you know that the guy that came up with the Nike 'swoosh', one of the most identifiable trademarks in the world, was paid only the equivilent of $35.00? Talk about underbidding!
When negotiating, hit'em high, you can always go down. Watch for body language. Men tend to swallow or inhale deeply if you're higher than expected. Women will sit more upright, inhale or put their hands together in some fashion. DON'T say a word! I have sat through the 'pregnant pause' for almost a minute, he who talks first loses and you were the last one to speak. The ball is in their court.
Practice being calm, cool and collected prior to the interview. Sit and practice your body language while imagining every question that might be asked and your reply. Do not fiddle, squirm or fidgit. Keep both feet flat on the floor. Sit up, this isn't a day at the beach. Keep your hands empty and open, move them for emphasis but don't go Italian. Never cross your arms unless you are ready to leave, this is an 'I'm about finished' signal. Good tactics if you're experienced, not recommended for a novice.
Go for it!
 
1 - 14 of 14 Posts
Top