Contractor Talk - Professional Construction and Remodeling Forum banner

1 - 4 of 4 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
In August, some poorly skilled contractors installed a concrete radiant floor system in my little weekend house in the Catskills. The floor has a nearly 2 inch differential in height and has a sandy, gritty texture--if you scape your shoe across it, you could dig all the way to the bottom. I have since fired the bad guys. One contractor after another came and inspected their work and told me how bad it was (one fellow said I "should shoot them!" the work was so appalling.). Though the work is horrible, the floor does generate heat. I've nearly figured out a way to cover the floor to make it liveable and would like to use the system if at all possible. (Some of the folks who have looked at the job are afraid that if I remove the concrete, it'll damage the house.) However, the last P.E. I had look at the job--concrete isn't his specialty--said he was worried for me that over the course of a year or two with expansion and contraction, the concrete would seriously crack. I have one crack already across a doorway, which may just be the house shifting, but there is another one started elsewhere. Is sandy, gritty, poor quality concrete likely to seriously crack over time? I've put in a call to my structural engineer about this and he's trying to find out, but I wondered if anyone else could give me guidance. Thanks much.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,573 Posts
Sandy and gritty to me means the concrete wasn't properly mixed which means it isn't 100% bonded which means it is weak which means it will crack.

You may be able to sue the contractor to bring the work up to code. I mean sue him for the money you paid to him, or the cost of what it will take for a reputable company to repair his shoddy work. This is what I would do. I would not mess around with sub-standard work. I would have anything in question documented and file a law suit.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
May not be concrete ...per se.

It's possible it's not conventional concrete. Seems likely it is a lightweight type mix. Not designed for abrasion resistance probably.
Call them back and show them the problem and ask for an explanation. Ask what they used specifically.....brand name of system, components used,etc.
Give them a last chance to correct the problem. If you get stuck with it, I might be able to help you with a sealing surface idea over it, but I'd have to know the details of what they used. don-ohio :)
 

·
Custom Builder
Joined
·
4,406 Posts
Grumpy and don are right. Sounds like improper product application, but just the same make sure the sandy gritty thing is not just a broom finnish however you still shouldn't be able to dig in it.......Food for thought......if it is a broom finnish they may have been COMPLETELY unskilled finnishers, broom finnish is for sidewalks, and a quick finnish. was it friday at beer thirty when they struck it off? .......sisisisnicker.
 
1 - 4 of 4 Posts
Top