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Motivated Noob
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
This will I will be ordering a Geoblaster from Wade and I couldn't be more excited. For the past few months I have putting together all of the pieces to start a mobile blasting business.

For the most part I have everything hammered out, however, I'm kind of stumped when it comes to pricing jobs. If anyone could give me some guidance on this issue it would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks!
 

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I understand your dilemma and all of us were in the same boat at one time. I still am since I officially opened for business only this month.

Only experience will give you the information you are looking for. I recommend starting with smaller jobs and working up. That way you don't quote a job and get too deep in a hole.

I have a spread sheet that I write estimated time, materials, and what I charged. Eventually I will have a good database to quote from.

I'm sure that those that have been blasting for a long time will tell you they still underestimate a job now and then.
 

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Motivated Noob
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68 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I understand your dilemma and all of us were in the same boat at one time. I still am since I officially opened for business only this month.

Only experience will give you the information you are looking for. I recommend starting with smaller jobs and working up. That way you don't quote a job and get too deep in a hole.

I have a spread sheet that I write estimated time, materials, and what I charged. Eventually I will have a good database to quote from.

I'm sure that those that have been blasting for a long time will tell you they still underestimate a job now and then.
Yeah I know there is going to be a lot of trial and error with the pricing. At this point I'm just wondering where to start with it.
 

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Glen
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1,504 Posts
As was mentioned earlier, you have to start with smaller jobs that you feel certain you can complete with in a few hours or by the end of a long day. You have to try out your equipment and have a feel for the most media and fuel you can use. I know I can go through as much as four bags an hour when I am going full out, worst case. I know my compressor will burn about two gallons an hour. at around nine bucks a bag that's forty and throw in eight for diesel. If I would like to earn one hundred an hour I can charge $150. per and be there or better.
Alternatively you can say to your self, after looking at the work ahead, I would be happy if I came out with $500. for the day. You might offer to do the work for five hundred plus material at x amount per bag and let the customer count the bags with you. You can offer a little higher price per bag if you want on going labor. You could just say $15. per bag. They don't have to know what you pay for it. Or you could say $500. plus forty an hour, or whatever cost you figure per bag you might use in one hour. I like the set price plus cost per bag. If you work hourly you may have a customer watching the clock and asking if you are charging them every time you stop for a repair or to rest or whatever. By the bag means they can not argue with you and the set price means you will not go home empty handed. You can't loose with this method and you will get better at knowing what you can get away with over time which will depend on the customer and the job. You always set the big price first. If they talk you down from $700. to $500. it's cool because that's when you tell them okay plus media at $25 per bag, or whatever will make up for the two hundred. If they take your first offer you can be a sport and give them nine bucks a bag. Any questions?
 

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Motivated Noob
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68 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
As was mentioned earlier, you have to start with smaller jobs that you feel certain you can complete with in a few hours or by the end of a long day. You have to try out your equipment and have a feel for the most media and fuel you can use. I know I can go through as much as four bags an hour when I am going full out, worst case. I know my compressor will burn about two gallons an hour. at around nine bucks a bag that's forty and throw in eight for diesel. If I would like to earn one hundred an hour I can charge $150. per and be there or better.
Alternatively you can say to your self, after looking at the work ahead, I would be happy if I came out with $500. for the day. You might offer to do the work for five hundred plus material at x amount per bag and let the customer count the bags with you. You can offer a little higher price per bag if you want on going labor. You could just say $15. per bag. They don't have to know what you pay for it. Or you could say $500. plus forty an hour, or whatever cost you figure per bag you might use in one hour. I like the set price plus cost per bag. If you work hourly you may have a customer watching the clock and asking if you are charging them every time you stop for a repair or to rest or whatever. By the bag means they can not argue with you and the set price means you will not go home empty handed. You can't loose with this method and you will get better at knowing what you can get away with over time which will depend on the customer and the job. You always set the big price first. If they talk you down from $700. to $500. it's cool because that's when you tell them okay plus media at $25 per bag, or whatever will make up for the two hundred. If they take your first offer you can be a sport and give them nine bucks a bag. Any questions?
Well said! Thanks. Still open to other suggestions as well. Do any of you guys have set prices for certain things? How about giving estimates for boat bottoms, cars, trucks, trailers, etc?
 

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Motivated Noob
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Now, I do have to inform you that we never discus actual prices on the forum. You may private message or e mail with anyone about anything they agree to talk with you about, but not on the open forum.
Well if anyone would be willing to chat please let me know!
 

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Getting good estimates

Now, I do have to inform you that we never discus actual prices on the forum. You may private message or e mail with anyone about anything they agree to talk with you about, but not on the open forum.
I am in the same position as the original poster in that I need to know where to start in my estimates. I am not looking for actual prices charged, but how long it would take to prep and blast (and aggregate bags) to blast say:

A truck cab off the frame?
A classic 40s sedan with glass and motor in it?
A 25' fiberglass boat hull in drydock?
A 19' boat trailer (boat removed of course)?
A standard 53' semi trailer?
An average car hood or panel (1 side)?
An aluminum step van (smaller than a UPS truck)?
 

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I think you have to learn from trial and error first and get to know your equipment . We started are company in April and in six months have learned a lot . We have lost are shirts on a couple of jobs and also proffited a great deal in some it's a learning curve. Tunning are equipment in and exploring other media really help us out . We do a great deal in square ft jobs so its easy that way . But we also have jobs we charge by the hour with a minimum of two hour . Look around see what your area can support for a hourly rate . Being in southern New England if we go north are hourly rate is much higher than in southern mass . As far as boats every state is different with EPA laws and guide lines . Know your laws and environmental duties . Some state you can't even power wash your boat . I will leave you with this always have your customers sign a contract and have everything in writing what you will and will not be doing .
 
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