Contractor Talk - Professional Construction and Remodeling Forum banner

21 - 40 of 62 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,193 Posts
Discussion Starter #21
How close do you think this is?

Hard to tell in the photos, but it does have a pink undertone.

Stain is the last thing you want to use to achieve the color you want.

Tom
TOM/ TJB.... Thanks......

I think your second picture sure looks pretty much dead on..... can ya tell me the recipe and application technique.

Peter
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,193 Posts
Discussion Starter #23
Just to come back to it, this was almost 100% sprayed, so it would be a tinted product sprayed on.
HD..... Would a pickling have been dusted on followed by a clear finish.... or do you think a tinted "clear" finish was sprayed.

TIA
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,193 Posts
Discussion Starter #24
After you get the general tone right, you will probably have to amber tone it to kill the brightness of a pickle finish. The original finish probably had a slight pink cast to it, that over time diminishes. Reds fade fast.

I would start with the white pickle, & add a little light brown pigment stain to help with the aging effect. Just buy the pickle, & add others to adjust/match.
Always sprayed on very popular a while ago, many many suppliers carried them. Any of the door manufacturers can match it, the pinkness turn a little yellow with the sun
Rail and RRK..... You're right.... in a certain light, I detect a hint of pink... not that I like that, but that is what I have to match/mimic... and I see a amber yellow quite a lot.

Thanks....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,193 Posts
Discussion Starter #25
Always sprayed on very popular a while ago, many many suppliers carried them. Any of the door manufacturers can match it, the pinkness turn a little yellow with the sun
Yes...That sounds like my stuff.... Really popular around here in the 90's... but I've been to SW/BM and alot of cab/MW shops.... and just have not found anybody that can tell me.

Thanks...

Peter
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,916 Posts
So what are you using to achieve the white?
Primer, either SW MP or SW W&W depending on how much titanium white I want. As you pointed out some boards are much more red, so I mix a touch of BAC green in a few ounces of primer for those boards. Spray bottle with water and a wet chip brush to "work" the blend.

Wet brush, dip in primer work in, us water bottle to "adjust" the primer viscosity on the wood.

This is the only way I've found that I can get things to match existing and get a good blend.

And a lot of practice....

Tom
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,193 Posts
Discussion Starter #27
So what are you using to achieve the white?
LEO....

To date, I've used pickling (or white wash..can't remember) by Minwax, and by Old Masters, and some pickling from BM, a custom mixed stain from SW, with and without a sanding sealer, and finished off with clear semi Minwax poly and/or Minwax water poly (I forget their name for it).

I've tried a semi-transparent tinted Olympic deck stain... that actually has come the closest with a oil poly top coat.

I'm brushing and no longer have my sprayer.

I'm currently (in the garage drying now) trying the Olympic water stain mixed/tinting the Minwax water poly.

I don't have any oil base tints here to try anything else.

Basically, the pickling are coming out too white (even after two oil poly coats) and too definitive in the grain....

These cabinets almost appear to have been fogged in a white tint finish, rather than stained.

Thanks
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,916 Posts
Try the primer, keep the brush water wet. Be patient, you may not think it's white enough. What until it dries to make the determination. You can always add more color.

Get a 2 ounce bottle of green dye so you can mix a little bit in primer to kill any red boards.

Tom
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,193 Posts
Discussion Starter #29 (Edited)
Primer, either SW MP or SW W&W depending on how much titanium white I want. As you pointed out some boards are much more red, so I mix a touch of BAC green in a few ounces of primer for those boards. Spray bottle with water and a wet chip brush to "work" the blend.

Wet brush, dip in primer work in, us water bottle to "adjust" the primer thickness on the wood.

This is the only way I've found that I can get things to match existing and get a good blend.

And a lot of practice....

Tom
Tom.... Thanks again.... but a few comments and mostly questions....

I'm in a small town/ 80 miles to Vegas/ but I do have a SW here.

Just went out in garage and grabbed the $15 quart of krap he mixed for me my first try (Wood Classics Oil Pickled White that he tinted orange... even gave him existing door and oak to test on).

But with your advice, I'll go back... but I want to know what I'm talking about with them (as i doubt they'll know).

Is MP their all purpose primer (think I've used it before)... what is WW and which is more titanium and which is less.... I think I want less white.

And BAC is their oil pigments aren't they.... are they ok in latex...???

Did you brush/wipe that second pic and finish off with a oil or water poly...?

Tia

Peter

(PS: I just x-posted and saw your recent comment....thanks...but still haavethe couple of above questions.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,916 Posts
MP is multi purpose. It is a brighter white. W&W is Wall and Wood, slightly duller. The white's will be brighter, not deeper.

See if they'll give you a shot of Color Cast green tint. The colorants are very concentrated.

Brush blended, all of my topcoats are waterborne.

That cabinet is sprayed KA+ BRE (bright rubbed effect)

Tom
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
18 Posts
Would a water base dye in water base poly get your pinkish top coat? The dye would have to be ordered, I'ts not common in hardware stores.
Trial and error is the only way to match a finish.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,528 Posts
We don't do any whites these days, but.....
White pickle uses a white pigment. We sometimes just used a little white primer, as per our supplier George Cash's advice. For the pinkish cast, Leo may be right on fresh red oak. The red will come from the oak. Our mixes went onto poplar to mimic the look of a pickle maple, & oak. If you do add red, it only takes maybe a 1/2 ounce red stain per qt. to get effect.
We always had to do a final wipe to raise the white up on pickle finishes, regardless of application technique. It was the only way to keep it consistent.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,089 Posts
TEXAS WAX.... Thanks.... I had tried Minwax, but went and checked and not sure if I used their water whitewash product or their #260 Pickled white Oak.

I don't think I realized they had two similar/but different product. The closest BB store is 40 miles.... hope they have both... worth a test.
Amazon will save you a trip :whistling

Solvent based 260 is likely your best bet. At least for the closest starting point. Then use previous advice like adding a touch of primer to get more white, for example.

Other consideration will be top coat and how it tints. Light stains and white in particular really tend to show the 'color' / tint of the top coat. If the original was a high build lacquer, gonna have a warm look as opposed to the waterbased poly's which push it cooler toward blue. You have 'some' control on the back end too in getting a better match.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,193 Posts
Discussion Starter #36 (Edited)
How many cabs do you need, anyway? Would a complementary finish work, like if you're adding an island, etc?
MARK...... Good out-of-box thinking... I did wish I could.... I'm adding small 10" bar pullouts to existing string of 4 cab island. (Changing out mismatched granite and going two tier bar top.)

(Thought about complete remodel/update.... but not a good economic feasable investment considering market etc)

Best
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,193 Posts
Discussion Starter #37 (Edited)
Just to come back to it, this was almost 100% sprayed, so it would be a tinted product sprayed on.
Agreed.

As I said, the last thing you want to use to achieve MTN's color is stain, especially a factory mix.

Tom
Amazon will save you a trip :whistling

Solvent based 260 is likely your best bet. At least for the closest starting point. Then use previous advice like adding a touch of primer to get more white, for example.

Other consideration will be top coat and how it tints. Light stains and white in particular really tend to show the 'color' / tint of the top coat. If the original was a high build lacquer, gonna have a warm look as opposed to the waterbased poly's which push it cooler toward blue. You have 'some' control on the back end too in getting a better match.
Everyone... THANKS.... Great Ideas/Help

I've got a bunch of attempts to try.... but I did learn some things last night.

I do believe it was not a pickling stain and clear coat... probably a tinted laquor spray on...??


1) I sanded down last night an old dishwasher panel that I had saved (and forgotton) and it is definately a tinted surface coating. There was no stain below the surface coat. (I don't know how to tell if it was a laquor.

2) Plus it makes sense just by examining it... no distinct staining in the graining and just a general even white haze over entire surface.

3) Plus I pulled a few more doors/hinges and found where the hinge bore had not been hit by the spray and it was not a stain.

OK... I'm a GC and not an accompliced finish painter. Plus when we retired I sold a whole lot of my shop in downsizing, and don't have a HVLP anymore...and would not know how to tint out or spray laquor.

Can you think of how I could mimic/fake that finish...???

especially maybe with a brush on poly. Can I get tints (maybe white and brown?????) for Minwax oil poly and lay it on very carefully.... much like their Polyshades product. What tints would you advise.

Would you advise I hit the bare Oak with some diluted bleach at first.

Would you advise that I hit the raw oak with a sanding sealer.

Do you have an idea of a better alternative advisable product and technique.

Thanks in advance for any/all advice everyone.

Best

Peter

(TEXAS WAX/RAIL..... I also tried some water base Olympic deck stain tinting a water base poly last night.... and that combination does come out alot brighter white and much cooler than probably my laquor finish. I am going to try a couple of top coats of oil poly and see if that warms it up.)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
26,142 Posts
I doubt they bleached these originally. Laundy bleach is sodium hypochlorite, wood bleach is oxalic acid. Two part wood bleach is hydrochloric acid & hydrogen peroxide (I think ).

Laundry bleach degrades the wood fibers.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
26,142 Posts
In general, the safest thing to do with something like this is put a sealer coat on, so if you screw up, you can wipe / wash off your tinted layer. You just have to make sure your solvent for the tint coat won't take off your sealer.

I don't see how you'd get a match brushing your tint coat on, but maybe....

If you have to, even a cheap airless is capable of getting a coat on, you just may have to thin it to work. By cheap, I mean I once used a $20 (on sale) HF airless 2200PSI.:eek:
 
21 - 40 of 62 Posts
Top