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New here..Hey---I am now in the painting business--new homes. Obviously i'm a woman. Need advice on best way to get into the business of heavy equipment operator??? Not a girly girl, not a hoe, not a **** (sorry for those out there, no offense). Have been a liscensed forklift and stockpicker driver. Not scared of hard work or mouthy men. Just want to know how a woman can go about getting some schooling, mentoring,.etc.... :Thumbs:
 

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Taught both my ex wives to drive my hoes, hell everybody could use some help around the stable.:cheesygri

How about that for a mouthy man?

Bob
 

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kimpossible said:
Need advice on best way to get into the business of heavy equipment operator... Just want to know how a woman can go about getting some schooling, mentoring,.etc.... :Thumbs:


Which state are you in?
 

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:rolleyes: NEED I SAY MORE!!!!!!!!!!!
Glasshousebltr said:
Taught both my ex wives to drive my hoes, hell everybody could use some help around the stable.:cheesygri

How about that for a mouthy man?

Bob
 

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kimpossible said:
...Just want to know how a woman can go about getting some schooling, mentoring,.etc.... :Thumbs:


Same way a man can - maybe even easier. With that said, here's my $.02.

I've been working around/running/using excavators, backhoes, loaders, dozers, and compactors since 1979. I don't know of any school that I would go to or otherwise recomend to somebody. IMHO, learning on the job is the only way to learn to run heavy equipment. Typically, you'll only get as good as the best guy (whatever) you can watch. Sometimes starting with a bigger company is better because you're more likely to get moved around where you can observe more experienced people. Watch, immitate, ask questions.

Compile a list of the following type of contractors in your area: earth moving, excavating, grading, sewer, underground utility. Call around and find out who's looking for "operators". When asked about your experience tell them the truth and explain that you realize that the pay level can only be commensurate with the experience you have (little) and that you don't expect to get paid more than a laborers wage at first (sorry all you union guys, that's how it works in the real world). With me, openess and honesty would get you in the door long before BS and braggadocio.

Once you get invited to interview show up early. Once you get hired show up early and work late without complaint. After six months of running equipment steady, I'd expect to be making at least 1/2 of what the highest paid operators are making -after a year at least 60%. After two years I'd expect to be making at least 80% of what the highest paid operators are making.

good luck and remember - always stay in the seat.

Oh,by the way

don't dress like this on the job ( safety and all you know) :Thumbs:
 

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Several friends of mine hire women almost exclusively to run their equipment. They say they are more thorough when maintaining the equipment, they typically work harder than men, don't whine as much, are easier on the equipment, etc.
I would call a few people and tell them exactly that. If they say they don't have anything for a couple weeks - call them in a couple weeks... and a week later... and a...
 

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We had a very secessful earth moving company in Rancho Cucmonga, CA. I can't remember the ladies names who owned it, but they didn't play "I can fix anything games". Every thing was done right, or the equipment didn't leave the yard. They were just a tad higher than everyone else, but it's worth it, to avoid having stand around guys at prevailing wage. And everyone hates the back-charge game.
If a company shows up when they said they would, with working equipment and they know what they're doing, regardless of trade, there is room for them.
 

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kimpossible said:
New here..Hey---I am now in the painting business--new homes. Obviously i'm a woman. Need advice on best way to get into the business of heavy equipment operator??? Not a girly girl, not a hoe, not a **** (sorry for those out there, no offense). Have been a liscensed forklift and stockpicker driver. Not scared of hard work or mouthy men. Just want to know how a woman can go about getting some schooling, mentoring,.etc.... :Thumbs:
I,ve in this business for while , probably the best way to start is as a laborer on a construction site , anyone can do it but forklift exp. doesn't count for much . You have to learn the safety aspects of trenching etc. it's easy but can be extremly dangerous
 

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Demo

Get a job working demolition. If you can do that, then you will be qualified for any type of construction work.
 

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Working as a laborer and or demolition is a good start, and the forklift experience does count for something not much though, start small and be very careful heavy machinery is not a joke. learn watch and learn, youll get there. just be careful, dont let the machine bully you. my 2cents. good luck
 
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