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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I just got through building some screen doors and I thought some of you might be interested, so I thougt I would share a couple pictures. They are made out of dougles fir with two #20 biscuits at each connection and lots of TB-III. The screen is actually 1" thick fiberglass grate (so no one puts their hand through the insect screen inadvertently). It and the insect screen are sandwiched in with some rabbeted moulding that I milled out of the same fir. I don't have a hinge mortise jig so I made a makeshift one that cut all the way through, but it worked out fine because the doors are only 1 3/8" thick so to fully support the hinges needed to be cut through. Does that make sense? The doors will be painted brown I believe. They are going on some community laundry rooms. Anyway, I just thought someone might want to have a look.
 

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Matt, you have some skills, nice design and execution, wecome to CT, complete your profile when you get a chance, GMOD:thumbsup:
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks Genecarp, I try to do the best I can on every job that I get, and hopefully word will spread. As I have said before I learn something new form you guys every day that I come to this site. I took your advice and completed my profile. I put a few pictures of some things that I have done since I started my little buisness, nothing spectacular, just the best that I know how.

Later, Matt
 

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I just got through building some screen doors and I thought some of you might be interested, so I thougt I would share a couple pictures. They are made out of dougles fir with two #20 biscuits at each connection and lots of TB-III. The screen is actually 1" thick fiberglass grate (so no one puts their hand through the insect screen inadvertently). It and the insect screen are sandwiched in with some rabbeted moulding that I milled out of the same fir. I don't have a hinge mortise jig so I made a makeshift one that cut all the way through, but it worked out fine because the doors are only 1 3/8" thick so to fully support the hinges needed to be cut through. Does that make sense? The doors will be painted brown I believe. They are going on some community laundry rooms. Anyway, I just thought someone might want to have a look.
where do you get that grating matt?
 

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Maker of fine kindling
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I really like the grating idea. Fiberglass will hold up nice and way easier than building that out of wood.:thumbsup:

If I was to take that on I probably would have done two things differently.

One I would have doubled the width of the bottom rail. The extra height would add a lot of extra strength to keeping it square. I'm not so sure as to how much help you are going to get from the grid but you may get all you need, not real sure. The other reason is that you would get less damage from feet making contact with the door.

Two, I would have gone with a mortise and tenon or a loose tenon in the corners rather than the #20's. That may just be me being paranoid about an embarrassing failure. Gorilla glue is not something I like using but I would have had it oozing all over the place on this job.

Just sharing, not ripping on you. I agree with Gene, you have skilz and I'm glad to see you posting here. Congratulations on stepping into theself employed way of life.:thumbsup: You'll do just fine.
 

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Gus,
I'd be interested in your reasons for liking Gorilla glue over T/B III for this project.
Not disagreeing with you, just picking your brain.
Dave
 

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Maker of fine kindling
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Gus,
I'd be interested in your reasons for liking Gorilla glue over T/B III for this project.
Not disagreeing with you, just picking your brain.
Dave
I guess I would have used it because I would have used a different method that would require a more expansive glue to ensure full coverage. I like that the poly glue is so down right water proof too.

These types of projects, like gates, keep me awake at night. Just my nature. I need to do all I can to settle my paranoia. The expansive poly glues help with that for some reason.

TB III has been tempermental in the shop for me. I'm sure I must have taken it out of clamps too soon or something, but I had to re-glue and clamp some stuff. Hard for me to trust it fully. I'm a freak I guess.
 
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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
:rolleyes: You have got me a little worried Mr. Gus. I did leave these glued up for a weekend and they seem to be very ridgid. The fiberglass is cut very tight and friction fitted in with a few screws to keep everything alligned properly. Now I am kind of concerned about the longevity of these doors. They are going to have door closers on them so they won't be slamed shut 50 times a day, do you think that will make a difference?


The grating is made by American Grating. I have to admit that I did'nt think of using it, but it worked out nicely, I think. I was just given the rough idea and had to make it work. Thanks for all the comments and suggestions, that's why I come here to learn better ways of doing things.
 

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Maker of fine kindling
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Those panels will help a ton.:thumbsup:
Sorry I have you alarmed. certainly not intentional. Like I said, I am a paranoid freak when it comes to things like this and it may not always serve me best.

I guess my initial assessment didn't take in to account the shear value of your panels. You have the doors in your hands and I clearly do not. If you shake them from one corner and you feel they are making the grade, go with that.:thumbup:

The closures add stress in their own way. The door will get tweaked a little every time it gets pushed open while the closure works against you from the top. It could be argued that they loosen a door's joints but again, you will get a good feeling when you install them or you won't. Let us know how it feels.

We are all learning from you, ya know :notworthy:laughing::notworthy
 

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Great looking doors! Nice skill set you have in building them.

If your having second thoughts about the toughness of those joints; A pair of 3/4" wood dowels with poly glue in each of the 4 corners and the hinged side of the center rail, drilled from the outside will perform almost as good as a mortise-tenon joint and add extreme strength and life to the joints. They will look good too.
 

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Maker of fine kindling
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Great looking doors! Nice skill set you have in building them.

If your having second thoughts about the toughness of those joints; A pair of 3/4" wood dowels with poly glue in each of the 4 corners and the hinged side of the center rail, drilled from the outside will perform almost as good as a mortise-tenon joint and add extreme strength and life to the joints. They will look good too.
That is a great idea right there.:notworthy:notworthy:notworthy
 

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Though I was sure somebody
would mention the Domino, I have
lots more faith in dowels than
biscuits for that kind of joint.

Gus is onto something (can't
give him another sig line quote)
with the bottom rail.
Wider makes a stronger door
along with other benefits mentioned.
 

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Box Builder
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Nice doors. I will also say though that I wouldn't use just biscuits on the doors. At the very minimal I would use dowels and titebond III to glue that door up. I really hate gorilla glue. I prefer a mortise and tenon joint with West system epoxy. That way I can sleep soundly.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Thanks MBS, that is a great idea. It looks like I will be getting some dowels. I should have posted here for some suggestions BEFORE I built them. Live, Learn, and do it better the next time I guess.

Matt
 

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Maker of fine kindling
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Thanks MBS, that is a great idea. It looks like I will be getting some dowels. I should have posted here for some suggestions BEFORE I built them. Live, Learn, and do it better the next time I guess.

Matt
Atta boy :thumbsup:

Can't hurt, won't take long, and you'll sleep better after.

Sounds like my sales pitch to my #1 client after a few glasses of vino.:laughing:
 

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Those doors don't look like an apprentice carpenter made them, you trying to pull our leg?

Nicely done.
 
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