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I have a hardwood floor to laydown on approximatly 1800sf. This is new construction but the floor joist layout on one section of the house is running parrell with the hardwood. I was always taught to run floring perpendicular to the floor joist. Will it matter to run flooring in the section of floor joist that will run same direction as hardwood? Thanks for any help.
 

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Flooring Guru
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hmm...nobody has asked what type of wood...

if it's engineered... and you float it...then there is no difference.
 

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hmm...nobody has asked what type of wood...

if it's engineered... and you float it...then there is no difference.
Floating a floor is great with light traffic , but at entry ways & halls it falls apart with 2 years .

Titebond II is great , but it can't handle the traffic with a full household with kids . If the underlayment padding is thick like the quietwalk , it will fall apart.
 

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Floating a floor is great with light traffic , but at entry ways & halls it falls apart with 2 years .
what? that makes no sense....
both are durable, both are valuable, both can't take water on the seams for long periods, both will dent, both will scratch.
one uses more wood than the other....that's about it.

do you have any logical information that proves that theory.....?
 

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We either naildown hardwood floors to a plywood sub-floor or glue-down to a slab. My competitors try to cut corners and just float engineered floors but they fall apart in high traffic areas.

When the floor flexes with the under-layment padding over time the glue applied to the tongue & groove fails.

Unless there's a locking system like a laminate there will be problems . Also the floor always sounds hollow; a nail-down installation or glue-down solves all problems.
 

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Your painting with a broad stroke here.

I have been installing floating engineered for many years now, in both commercial and residential areas and have never had one come apart.

Just like anything else, when done correctly it will last.

Engineered has its applications where solid hardwoods cant go, so to say you would never use an engineered or a floating floor either means your missing out on work or using solid where it shouldnt go.
 

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When the floor flexes with the under-layment padding over time the glue applied to the tongue & groove fails.

Unless there's a locking system like a laminate there will be problems
There are plenty of woods with locking systems with no glue.
but I still disagree.
Anderson makes a hell of a nice wood with tounge and groove...it's engineered and it has worked great.
I would think in 13 years, I would agree with you if that statement was true.

so to say you would never use an engineered or a floating floor either means your missing out on work or using solid where it shouldnt go.
that is correct.
that's like me saying Solid wood is crap because it has more movement than engineered.
but that's why we use billions of cleats right?
both woods are fine.
 
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