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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Does anyone have a suggestion on how to cut HardiePlank siding while/after it is installed? I had to replace a window that was slightly larger than the existing window, which made the space for the window trim/casings a bit smaller. It is not an option to make the casings smaller (it is a historic house and all the casings have to match). Eventually, all the windows will be replaced one side at a time, so this is a "test" window to assess what needs to be done.

We cannot remove the siding to solve this issue, otherwise we would end up taking almost all the siding off and then have to re-install it again. I know there has got to be an efficient way to get this done. the only thing I can think of is to just strike a line and cut it with a circular saw. Is there another better way?

Thanks
 

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Project Manager HFH..
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Multimaster.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
They sell another brand of those at Lowe's for $99. If I recall, it was a decent brand that made them. It seems like a lot of work for such a small tool, but I can give it a try on some leftover pieces of siding. Thanks.
 

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I use an angle grinder with a tile cutting blade. Smooth all the way around. It stirs up alot of dust but, it is easier to work with than a circular saw. It's probably much faster than a multi tool.
Jeff
 

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I use an angle grinder with a tile cutting blade. Smooth all the way around. It stirs up alot of dust but, it is easier to work with than a circular saw. It's probably much faster than a multi tool.
Jeff
Yeah, save the multi tool for the last
bits in the corners to square up.
 
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It's a historic building and it has Hardie siding on it? YUK

I have only done a couple of projects with that product. Both of them comercial buildings. I hope I never get another one.

I know of a couple of people that used that up north and they are having huge problems with it holding paint. I guess they now make a different product for cold climates. My friends house in NH is only a couple of years old and the paint is coming off in sheats right down to the factory applied primer.

And as far as the subject goes I would opt for the angle grinder and a good dust mask.

Dave
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks everyone - I will give the angle grinder a try.

RE: HardiePlank Siding
You would be hard pressed to tell the difference between the smooth HardiePlank siding vs Cedar clapboards. One of my projects was to join two historic homes to make one larger house. One of the houses needed to be entirely renovated. That house got HardiePlank, the other house was wood clapboards. The difference between the two is so subtle that no one except a seasoned architect or an experienced builder could tell the difference (and most of the difference that gave it away was the difference in how it look finished; the wood clapboards looked older and the paint had a different texture/finish look to it). As for the finish peeling off, if ordered with one of the pre-finished colors it is guaranteed for 15 years. Also, I am pretty certain that most decent paint companies will extend their warranties if they know it is going to be applied to HardiePlank siding (I've heard as long as 25 years, but I haven't verified that). I don't know about your friend's experience. That is too bad that they had such a problem. It certainly would have turned me off.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Well, I am happy to report that the angle grinder with a tile cutting disc worked extremely well. Thanks for the advice.
 

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I should have noted that the people from Hardie siding are working with my friend to make things right. They admitted there is an issue and will make it right. That is all you can ask for. Any product can have problems but you hope if there is an issue that the company will stand behind thier products and this seams to be the case here.

Dave
 

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They sell another brand of those at Lowe's for $99. If I recall, it was a decent brand that made them. It seems like a lot of work for such a small tool, but I can give it a try on some leftover pieces of siding. Thanks.
I believe one of the box stores is carrying Dremel.


Sonic Crafter is another less expensive option than the MultiMaster.
 

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For cutting a small quantity of plank on the wall, a 2” carbide saw blade may work best. Carefully set your depth so as to not cause damage to the underlying structure. Make sure to use proper protective equipment (dust mask, safety glasses, gloves, etc). A die grinder may be useful in some tight locations.
 

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Angle grinder, tile blade, like they said smooth all the way around.

for dust control, which you almost have to do, have someone else hold a shop vac a few inches away from the grinder... catches 99% of the dust and you can still see your cut line, finish cut is smooth too... weve had to do it a few times, works great... make sure your wearing hearing protection, gets loud.
 

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I don't know if this would help you or not. I just used mine (just got it today) to cut some curves in Hardi siding today & it worked great (& fast). The cleanest cut is on the back side. I don't know if this would get all the way through the siding where is overlaps, but you could probably cut the last 3/4 with a knife?
Steve
I bought mine off Ebay for around $80. Amazon is high, so you could probably do better elsewhere.
http://www.amazon.com/Malco-TSF2-Turbo-Shear-Backer/dp/B001B9Y8VQ

Does anyone have a suggestion on how to cut HardiePlank siding while/after it is installed? I had to replace a window that was slightly larger than the existing window, which made the space for the window trim/casings a bit smaller. It is not an option to make the casings smaller (it is a historic house and all the casings have to match). Eventually, all the windows will be replaced one side at a time, so this is a "test" window to assess what needs to be done.

We cannot remove the siding to solve this issue, otherwise we would end up taking almost all the siding off and then have to re-install it again. I know there has got to be an efficient way to get this done. the only thing I can think of is to just strike a line and cut it with a circular saw. Is there another better way?

Thanks
 

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I don't know if this would help you or not. I just used mine (just got it today) to cut some curves in Hardi siding today & it worked great (& fast). The cleanest cut is on the back side. I don't know if this would get all the way through the siding where is overlaps, but you could probably cut the last 3/4 with a knife?
Steve
I bought mine off Ebay for around $80. Amazon is high, so you could probably do better elsewhere.
http://www.amazon.com/Malco-TSF2-Turbo-Shear-Backer/dp/B001B9Y8VQ
How would that work if the siding is already on the wall? :blink:
 

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Well, they are kinda like tin snips. Possibly you could slip them under the overlapping piece? My limited experience is that Hardiplank get pretty brittle with age. My idea would probably just break the pieces that you don't want to cut?
Steve

How would that work if the siding is already on the wall? :blink:
 
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