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Discussion Starter #1
I have this little flipper proprerty that is sided with T-111, all in good shape. It's over 5/8 CDX siding. I'm thinking of going over it with Hardieboard. I'm planning on blocking off all of the grooves with paint paddles and bondo. Follow with a coat of West System epoxy about a foot from the base to seal everything up, add some Tyvek and then the Hardie.
I believe that the epoxy should stop any termites or other bugs from entering from below. Tyvek should stop any water that manages to make it through the Hardie.
Anyone see any flaws that I'm missing?
 

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Why block off the grooves at all? There's no need. Infact the grooves will allow air flow behind which might be a good thing. I know it is with real wood.

Personally I'd be totally comfortable with tyvek and the necessary flashings being 100% water tight on my own home... and this is a flipper?

If termiates are a problem I have seen on "TOH" a topical pesticide that supposedly lasts 20 years, and is usually applied directly where the framing meets the foundation to prevent insects from working their way into the building. I think this might be a more affordable and proper method of blocking insects.

Really I don't see anything wrong with it, other than wasted time and money for no reason with the epoxy and bondo.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Grumpy, we have a variety of wood consuming insects down here. Carpenter bees, Carpenter ants and more than one variety of termite, Formosan's are also on the way.

The extra work doesn't bother me. My family name has stood for honesty and quality since 1690 in this country, I don't plan on being the one that breaks the chain. At some point in the future, I expect to meet my antecedents and I don't want them to see me as some 'hack job for a few bucks' type. Bad Karma.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Grumpy, I frequently cross marine materials over into homes because they are superior. Bondo is used as a fairing compound, never anything structural and epoxy is hands down the best sealer against water and bugs.
With West System epoxy running about $100.00 a gallon, this is far from the cheapest way out.
I am always replacing T-1 and it invariably rots or is invaded from the bottom edge. My thought is by sealing this edge and about 1 ft. up (to take care of any wicking) the stuff should last longer.
 

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I never suggested it was the cheapest I suggested it wasn't traditional, proper or beneficial. I also suggested there may be cheaper and (key word here) more proper methods to acheive the same result; but it seems like you have your mind made up. Could it work? I can't answer that for sure but my initial thoughts are "Yes, in theory."

Don't forget the foundation flashing at the bottom which helps protect against capilary action and splashing up of water.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I suggested it wasn't traditional, proper or beneficial.

Herein lies the problem. Homes here should be different than in Kansas. Here we bake in the sun, have lots of rain, very few cold days, very rarely freeze, have a variety of wood eating insects and get these wonderful little windstorms. We have the technology to build homes that will last under all of these conditions but fail, for the most part, to implement it. A 200 MPH structure, well insulated and constructed out of nothing any bug would ever eat does not cost much more to build than conventional construction but few people want to think outside of the box. People continue building the same traditional, proper homes that are destined to be destroyed or compromised by known factors.
 

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Ofcoarse homes in Montana should be built different from homes in Florida, which is why I asked "Is it typical for remodelers in your area...?"

As you may have noticed throughout the years, I rely on more traditional and teted means to satisfy my customers' needs. Sometimes trying new things because they "should work better" is worse than using tried and true methods.

That's just my opinion. Do I stray from the ordinary from time to time? Yes but it seems like you are making a drastic leap in faith to acheive some goals when there are current tried and true methods of acheiving the same end goal.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Sadly, no. Most would not care even if it was rotten, they would just slam the hardie over it.
Bondo use is fairly common and often used incorrectly to hide damage that should be repaired such as rotten door frames. As for the epoxy, I doubt that many of them know that it exsists or how to use it. The majority would also think it too expensive.
 
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