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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've sold a HO on building a large garden shed which I'd like to install hardie siding on. (Home owner wants durability & almost no maintenance).

Having never worked with the stuff, I'd appreciate suggestions / links to good threads on working with their siding.

About the only thing I know is that you can work it pretty much like wood, and need to be VERY careful about preventing inhalation of the silicates.

So, any do's or don'ts you'd care to share?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Those shears look good. Probably cut way down on the dust, too. I'll include price in bid!

Any other tips / techniques?
 

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No maintenance-----Hardie board........doesn't make sense. May as well sell the paint and a brush along with it.

Recommendation----another product
 

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Hardie does have a pre colored cement siding like the Color Max CertainTeed product. Just follow the directions to the T. The shears and are like 400 if I remeber right. And NO it is nothing like wood.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
... And NO it is nothing like wood.
See, its a good thing I posted my question! The only person I know who has hardie on their house bragged that it's no maintenance - and I don't know anyone locally who has installed it (except for the one guy I talked to at HD who said he'd put some up & cut everything with his circ-saw - he at least mentioned the dust issue...).

MJW said:
No maintenance-----Hardie board........doesn't make sense. May as well sell the paint and a brush along with it.

Recommendation----another product
Like what? The HO doesn't like the look of vinyl & doesn't want aluminum.
 

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You will most likely see this in the instructions however the only "cut" edges should be agianst windows, doors, and corner boards and you must either prime those cut edges or use the touch up paint if you are using the pre colored hardie. It is also very difficult to hang by yourself, you will want to put a helper on your bid too.
 

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I am so glad you guys are telling us that Hardie is "true garbage"! now we really know. I guess the 1200 (give or take a few) homes I have resided with Hardie since 1997 - all without a single issue- all need to be resided with something better?

If your going to dog a product, at least be specific with your issues.
 

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Hey, it's just my opinion.

It breaks, moves, pops nails, molds, and needs to be painted. What else can you ask for.

It's really no different than the old masonite lap siding. It needs good paint, it's thinner, more flimsy, requires special fasteners, relies on caulking to keep moisture out. Oh ya, that's one more thing to be added to the painting thing.....I'm sure the caulking will need to be stripped and re-applied.

For the cost and labor, I just don't think it's worth it.
 

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Thanks, we can learn from that, alot more than a general statement! I know that Hardie does not perform in your cold climate as well as it does here in Florida, but it has proven to be a much better alternative than most other siding products we have available.
 

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I'm sure it does work a little better in your climate.

BTW, if you've been installing this for the last 12 years, you may want to go back and see if they need new paint by now. ;)
 

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No doubt they need paint, thats where our environment kills us- the sun attacks everything, even vinyl fades out in 2-4 years. Brick is the best answer but has its problems ($$$ and termites love to get behind it)
 

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I can imagine. I've seen some cheapo siding melt in the sun here when it is close to shingles.

We will need work in the future though, so all is good. Nothing lasts forever.
 

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I've sold a HO on building a large garden shed which I'd like to install hardie siding on. (Home owner wants durability & almost no maintenance).

Having never worked with the stuff, I'd appreciate suggestions / links to good threads on working with their siding.

About the only thing I know is that you can work it pretty much like wood, and need to be VERY careful about preventing inhalation of the silicates.

So, any do's or don'ts you'd care to share?
I would avoid it all costs
 

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I just did a job with Certainteed Fiber Cement. You have to paint all cuts which is VERY time consuming. You also have to keep it 1" off the roof which leaves the step flashing exposed. My customer wasn't too happy with that at first, but got over it. Malco also makes these metal brackets which allow you to hang long pieces by yourself. And you HAVE to keep the stuff very well protected before installation. If the edges get wet, they will delaminate. I used the lap siding and 4 x 8 stucco panels, kept it all well protected and painted all cuts, and I have no complaints. It looks good and looks exactly like the cedar clapboard we replaced.
 

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I think the stuff (Hardi) is the bees knees. You do have to be careful handling it, careful with your nailer when tacking it up and wear a mask when cutting (yeah, life sucks). Howver, from the wet climate I'm from, the stuff performs (no mold issues, warping or cracking), and looks fanatastic (just looks clean). Its low profile allows you to paint it easily. I reckon (ad hoc) that it has a much better R value and noise suppresion than vinyl/plastic. You can get guages to hold your piece up, so it can easily be a one person show. The only thing that sucks is the blade...quite a pop for each. The shears are the best route for limiting dust, but the line suffers. Lastly, it takes quite a fire to burn (smoulder) a plank.
As for edges...I say that is what caulking is for.....;)
And who in the world would buy hardi without it being at least primered....
Rah rah rah!
 

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just finished a commercial job 23 SQ with all the widths of the XLD 5/4" trim board and the Hardie Soffit
Pros....hardie claims a 25 year maintenance free warranty other than that... ill get back to you on that one
Cons....Trim and siding are very expensive, slow unless you have the proper tools, nails must be set/filled/painted, and i hope you like caulking because it uses alot. hardie recommends everywhere it butts the trim (sides), and paint finish on pre-finished is questionable. There were runs,puddles,sags in the factory finish and paint built up edges. Luckily the finish we had was light mist (gray) so that was hard to see from a distance.
both were pre finished. Scarf your trim if you have a long piece; my opinion, the prefinsihed is nice but you have to do alot of touch up and repainting anyway. The colors available are Sherwin-Williams own colors so matching is absolutely perfect. When starting out, keep the siding 6" from the finished grade. As for cutting, get a Hardie-Blade from Home depot or Lowes. Thats the best thing hands down. Definately worth the $40. I bought The ridig cement board saw that was "supposily" dust free and the best for cutting the hardie (basically a grinder with a circular saw handle). It was a waste. The blade dulled out too fast and since the blade was so thin and flimsy, it would lean when trying to cut the 5/4". The best thing about the cement saw was i was able to return it after a week. I hope this helps
 
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