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I am looking for information on the long edge of the drywall panel. I have had an issue with the edge being very hard and unable to set the screw properly. The framing is 25 or 20ga steel studs with 1 1/8 point type s screws. This problem has been for sevral years now and have had little succsess with finding a solution to the problem.
Some solutions have been: wetting the edge down with water a day or so before the panels are hung, setting the screw 2-3" from the edge in the soft part of the panel or setting the screw after all the panels are hung.
 

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Dear Moran:

How long have you been hanging drywall? Can you explain this situation more clearly? Are the panels being hung horizontally or vertically?
 

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I am an accomplished journeyman for 20+years. I have been dealing with this problem for 5+years. I have hung 100+ sheet in an 8 hour shift given the right framing and size of drywall. The answer about which way the drywall has been hung is both ways. The edges are still the same and the product manufacture is CertainTeed corp.
 

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What type/thickness of drywall is this happening with?
 

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Are you using a cordless gun? Seems I have had that spinning out in the flat because it is so hard when the gun is less than 6,000 RPM's. I had a Makita that was 4,000 and noticed it a lot. Then switched to a DeWalt that is 6K. Happens more on steel studes because the screw takes that split second to drill through the metal. With wood, it pops right through. But if you ask the rep. at least in my area, they will tell me I am the only one that has said anything. Doesn't matter what it is I ask about. Mud, tape, rock, delaminating paper on the rock. I am just the lucky one that is the only one that got that batch. Riiiight! any way, I'm not much help beyond, another guy knowing what you are talking about. As compared to the ______ Antonio! Wonder where his comment comes from... I guess we just all need to :notworthy to him. And maybe not.:no:
 

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I don't think it's that the factory edge is hard.
I think what's happening is: Because of the continuous taper your clutch is being engaged
as it hit's the highest point of the edge you're trying to screw into.
When I'm installing drywall horizontally, I try not to put my screws in the tapered edge at all.
Vertically you just have to make it happen.
Hope this makes sense.:thumbsup:
I am looking for information on the long edge of the drywall panel. I have had an issue with the edge being very hard and unable to set the screw properly. The framing is 25 or 20ga steel studs with 1 1/8 point type s screws. This problem has been for sevral years now and have had little succsess with finding a solution to the problem.
Some solutions have been: wetting the edge down with water a day or so before the panels are hung, setting the screw 2-3" from the edge in the soft part of the panel or setting the screw after all the panels are hung.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
A few more things: For me the standard rock size is 4'x12' 5/8 type x rock. I have hung tons of that type over the years up in Portland Oregon on many projects all over town. Our company has used DeWalt screw guns since I was a cub. We have intergraded the Hilti screw gun in the past few years but I personally dont like them and its a prefrance not that they are bad. Belive me I have hung so much rock on a job that I have burned up sevral DeWalts. Thats a lot of screwing! Our company have had over a hundred drywallers before 2008 and the hard edge was one of the main complants. We even went so far as to call a Rep to explain why the problem of cracked edges and striped screws exsisted were as the problem was not there in the 90's. We were told that the hard edge was created for stocking reasons( ie stocking on the wall as opposed to laying flat).
As for the reason for investagating this problem 2 years later is because I am involved in a school project. I thought that this problem would be an easy one to write about. I was sadly mistaking. I found that the Gypsum Ass.(GA) is the only one that has a good exsample of the screwing pattern. I also found that the hard edge is not always a problem on every job. Even if it was most guys in the field screw 2-3" below the hard edge to get the rock on the wall. Yes never mind that screwing pattern is not right.
The GA recomends that when applying a panel that the starting point is in the exsact middle of the sheet and then work out to the edges of the sheet. The standard pattern is 12" in the field and 8" on the edges where as the screw on the edges are with in 1" max and 3/8" min. Bear that in mind and you have a problem with hard recceses then you get cracked rock and striped screws.
I would like to know if any one has had this problem and how to solve it. To me its easy quit making hard recceses and every thing will be like it was.
thank you,
Daniel
 

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Hi. Been a long time since last posting. Anyway, hard bevels are caused in the factory when the rollers that create the bevels on the board aren't set properly (they over compress the gypsum). Have encountered this on many occasions. Really sucks when boarding over lighter guage steel. Screws just strip out.

Only way to get around it is to let the screws spin out before setting them. You set the screw in the bevel and don't put enough pressure to set it. Kinda like pre-drilling in wood. That way the screw will countersink and still have enough grab to hold the board. Time consuming and it sucks, but it works. I've actually gone back on my suppliers when I got crappy board like that and they actually refunded the company $$ because of the extra time and hassle.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Thanks theworx. I have tryed many ways of dealing with the problem and yes that is one of the ways that I have tryed on the edge many times. I belive that during 2006-08 there had been such a demand that truck loads of rock from the plant wouldnt even make it to stroage. I had it still warm at times! Now a days I have seen less of the problem because of the time in stoage and the great northwest sunshine(rain).
I just completed a 500 sheet job 2 months ago and there was the problem again. This time it was Goragia Pacific type x 5/8 12ft rock. My guys just screwed 2-3" below the edge and it was fine. The walls were simple office walls so I was not that concerned. Annoyed yes but as you know time is money.
I am rapping up an recommendation report for my company and should have some good insights. I am interested any any one that has had this problem and how they solved it.
The apprenticeship school advised me that the hard edge was due to the recycled gypsum. The Rep. from CertainTeed said it was aboiut how rock is stocked on the job site.
 

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Sorry, the suppliers and manufacturers could care less in my opinion. We have been dealing with that problem for years.

Yes, it really sucks. We screw the edges one screw at a time,trigger lock not on ........let the screw grab but not spin out :sad:

Then the finisher has to deal with it...........Little extra joint compound on some flats.

Some of this problem are the metal studs, they are thinner and softer.


Good Luck! :party:
 

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Hung some board today.......Those hard edges really suck bad:furious:.


Thank God I never had to deal with that crap in my younger days. I was known to throw my hammer through a wall or two when I got pissed.:w00t:

There would have been alot more holes in walls if that crap was around. :laughing:
 
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