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I notice a lot of guys hanging drywall with impact drivers these days. I think they like not dealing with cords. It seems there are way more screws set below the paper. I know this causes pops. What do you think?:thumbsup:
 

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I notice a lot of guys hanging drywall with impact drivers these days. I think they like not dealing with cords. It seems there are way more screws set below the paper. I know this causes pops. What do you think?:thumbsup:
I know they really generally don't know how to hang drywall, period- Using "impact" drivers. OK --well ---let me re-phrase that. If you hung rock for the guys I learned from, you would not use one a lot, if ever. Small jobs like a few sheets are fine, only if you pop another screw for everyone you break the paper on. Still far more efficient with a dedicated DW screw gun. But don't tell anyone who uses an "impact" in place of one all the time LOL

Cordless drills with stops, wprk well if adjusted right.

But what hey, I've known "Drywallers" who used carpentry hammers to drive drywall nails and blasted 50% of the paper LOL
 

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It is very slow. When impact drives first came out, I tried it for about 4 screws. I do however use a cordless drill and a "dimpler" for small amounts of drywall. It works good, but it is alot slower compared to a drywall screw gun.
 

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I actually tried this hanging board on the ceiling, but just for a few screws to hold it in place. It's slow, and you're likely to have to take screws back out due to breaking the paper. Other than that, it's a wonderful idea.

I'd never screw off a whole sheet with one - I still use corded DW drivers for the speed and control.

I can see using one for a really tight area, but I'd be inclined to use glue, and pull the screws after it has set up. There's an are I've worked on before that you have to open both sides of an adjacent wall to to get access to open a wall to access plumbing. It's too tight for a regular DW driver.
 

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More questions: I can't sleep. Any advantage in using liquid nail's? Anyone use a strip screw gun like Ridgid or Senco?
Been a while since I've been involved in hanging drywall but used to use a battery powered Senco strip screw gun and it worked great, set the screw just right. One caveat, we weren't involved in production drywalling so speed wasn't a priority.

Actually with the gypsy jack, the roto zip and the senco along with the radio set on the oldies station it made hanging the stuff kind of fun instead of the grunt work it can be.
 

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On our crew the odd tack with a cordless is ok, but way too slow for screwing off sheets. A good man on a drywall gun will outscrew you 4 to 1. Also too hard to get the right set on the screw. Cant beat a tool designed specifically for the task. Don't know if they make a cordless drywall gun. They should if they don't.
 

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More questions: I can't sleep. Any advantage in using liquid nail's? Anyone use a strip screw gun like Ridgid or Senco?
I don't know anyone who uses liquid nails. There are pros that use adhesive routinely. I'll use adhesive in some circumstances. If I'm doing airtight drywall approach (developed in Canada), or any other one where I want air sealing, I'll use adhesive. Anything framed on the flat.

In spite of it not doing anything to fire ratings of assemblies, the air sealing does help in actual practice to keep fire from spreading bay to bay. I did an extensive remodel on one house, used 5/8 Type X on an egress (I could have left the 1/2" there) and adhesive to make everything air tight. The combination of Type X, insulation, and air tight kept it from burning roof bay to roof bay once a fire burned through the side of the building. The Fire Chief complimented the owner on the work that was done - I was happy about that, and happier no one was hurt.
 

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The biggest problem with cordless drills these days is that they have all gone to T-handle design, instead of pistol grip. For jobs like drilling with small drill bits, & running drywall screws, you want your hand in line with the bit/screw. That's why all drywall guns are pistol grip!

It seems to me that the hot set up would be a pistol grip dw gun with a brushless motor, & a belt clip battery pack with a 4' to 5' cord. The gun weight would be minimal, brushless have plenty of hp, the belt clip battery pack would have a crazy big Mah rating, & wouldn't not be resricted to dragging a cord around room to room.

Interesting thing is, B&D used something similar to this (belt clip pack) in their original cordless drill setups. Today, I can't even find any referance to them.

Joe
 

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I can imagine what DeWalt would charge for an extended use battery pack.

My first recollection of drywaller's using battery drivers was when Panasonic came out with a drill / driver that would drive something like 500 drywall screws before it needed recharging, but that was a bunch of years ago.

You're right about the ergonomics - that's one thing the dedicated guns have.
 

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I always use my screw gun to hang. On a job I did a few months back I was hanging some 1/2" over some rock hard plaster ceilings, so I was using 2 1/2" screws.

The joists and plaster were so hard! I used my impact driver with the little cheap dimpler attachment. It worked pretty good. A lot less stripped screws!


Dave
 

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I use one every once in a while for a sheet or two, anything more than that I'm pulling out a screw gun. Then again I'm a commercial guy, I could not imagine using an impact for thousands of sheets lol, but I don't even use then on my residential side work. They are great for casework !
 

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Small jobs it's the impact with a drywall bit. Once I got the feel I can time it just right to not break the paper, not more than my DW gun.

For big jobs I have a few Sencos that I don't know what I would do without.
 
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