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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Anyone else into the tools our fathers, or better yet, our grandfathers used? I'm only 28, so I missed out on these tools being used on the regular by a long time, but I've got somewhat of a soft spot for "vintage" hand tools.

Without sounding sappy, I think it was a neat way to do things, by hand. Took longer, yes, and was more laborious as well, but in my mind, could have led to a fantastic finished product in the right hands.

The best part of the manufactured planes? All stamped MADE IN USA. Tough finding that anymore.

Here's a few pics of them lined up at attention. I can get more detailed ones if anyone would like, as I just took a few at first to get this up.

Picture 922a.jpg

Picture 923a.jpg

Picture 924a.jpg

Left to right is a wooden, I would assume block plane. Not quite sure of the age.

Next is a Stanley Bailey No. 4. I did some research and have this figured to be a Type 16 which was produced between 1933-1941.

Next to that is a Millers Falls No. 18C which was produced between 1929 and 1967. This is the equivalent of a Stanley No. 6C.

These three were given to me today by my girlfriend's grandfather. The pictures don't do them justice. They are in fantastic shape.

Next to that is another Stanley Bailey. This one is a No. 6 as well. This was given to me by my uncle back in the summer. He found it in his old house in Zelienople (near Pittsburgh) and toted it with him from there, back to NEPA, and then again to SEPA.

I did some research on that one, and have it pegged at a Type 9. It's got two Patent dates on it, Mar 25-02 and Aug 19-02. This was produced between 1902-07. This one must be able to tell some awesome stories.

This was rusted to all hell when he handed it to me. I did some research and picked up a product called Evapo-Rust at HF. Took the plane apart, covered it in product, let it sit a couple hours and it came out looking like new.

The final wooden one was my first purchase. I found it on eBay and probably overpaid for it, but it was cheap enough. The description said it was from the 1920's or so, but who knows.

I'm lucky enough that my girlfriend let's me display the wooden ones around the apartment, along with some other knick-knacks. :thumbup: The rest of them will be getting some use once I get the irons sharp.
 

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In NZ most builders will have a No.4 in the box and a block plane in their bags when doing trim. Handsaws are still used widely.
 

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Trees are Cool
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I used my jointer plane to bevel a cedar cap once. Only took 25 min. or so. It made a cool sound, and I was amazed that the sole of the plane got so hot, you could not touch it. Hand tools are cool. It is worth learning how to use them.
 

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To the OP, Im around your age and I agree our generation missed out on good hand tools and woodworking.

I went to votech in highschool and we were required to use hand planes the first year to make all types of jointery. It really gave us an appreciation for quality and how to produce it.

Those are some beautiful tools you've got! If your looking for more, I always have good luck at flea markets. Some people really dont know the value of what theyre selling... :whistling
 

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Nice collection!

I use a block plane all the time for trim. I get these comments like, "Wow, you must really be a craftsman!"
 

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I use my Stanley 60 1/2 on just about every trim job be is residential or commercial. Biggest use it has seen lately is in scribing baseboard or fillers, I cut them with a bevel and then scribe in the taper.

I also routinely use it to bevel doors, to bevel wall panels to slide in tight against a wall, and to backbevel miter joints.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
So what methods do you guys use to sharpen the blades?

I've seen so many methods I don't know where to start. Wet stones, oil and stone, grinders, the Scary Sharp Method™.

Any tips? How meticulous do you get with getting everything flat?

It dawned on me a couple days ago that I screwed up when formulating my Christmas list. I should have asked for a couple wet stones from Lee Valley.
 

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JR Shepstone said:
So what methods do you guys use to sharpen the blades? I've seen so many methods I don't know where to start. Wet stones, oil and stone, grinders, the Scary Sharp Method™. Any tips? How meticulous do you get with getting everything flat? It dawned on me a couple days ago that I screwed up when formulating my Christmas list. I should have asked for a couple wet stones from Lee Valley.
I use diamond wet stones and the veritas angle jig. Wet stones are great as you don't have to worry about keeping them flat. I follow up with a strop. I can get a murro finish that way.
 

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Punching above his weight
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If you guys are looking for old hand planes, go to an antique store. Those places always have a small corner of "antique tools". usually a couple broken hammers, a brace and bit, and a rusty plane. I got my small block plane at an antique/junk shop for $3. hah
Totally fine. Just sharpened the blade a bit and away we went. Every antique dealer knows what a No. 1 looks like, but most don't care about a standard plane that sells new, today, Made in China for $20-$30. They're very common and you can almost always find a Miller's Falls or Stanley for $5-10.
 

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It is a good idea to resurface an old plane too. Sometimes the sole gets out of wack, but it can be flattened pretty easily.
 

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Hack
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I got hooked on vintage tools a couple years back and started grabbing some as soon as I could find them.
I really enjoy using them but just don't have the shop space to use them as much as I like.
But I do have most of the planes I would like, and continue to keep them maintained and sharp.
I use a variation of the scary sharp technique: a slab of granite from a local counter top company with 4 different grits of wet/dry sandpaper; running from 240 to 2000 grit. Gives 'em a mirror and, well, scary sharp finish.
 

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KemoSabe
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These were all handed down to me by my dad. Many, including the benchtop saw were my grandfathers, who worked in a lumberyard millwork shop building windows and doors.
 

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loneframer said:
These were all handed down to me by my dad. Many, including the benchtop saw were my grandfathers, who worked in a lumberyard millwork shop building windows and doors.
That's cool your grand father used those tools. I broke alot of my dads tools he learned on when I was a little kid building stuff. Or lost them in the building of many club houses I made in the lumber yard. Wish I had taken better care of them just for the fact they would be cool to display on the shop wall.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 · (Edited)
loneframer said:
These were all handed down to me by my dad. Many, including the benchtop saw were my grandfathers, who worked in a lumberyard millwork shop building windows and doors.
That's the quite the collection you've got. Almost compares to the nail guns. Where do you keep all this stuff? :laughing:

That table saw looks wicked scary. I bet that made you pay attention to what you were doing.
 

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I use them a lot to.I enjoy it.these are just some of mine. I got a few more since I took this picture. My favorite s are the old marples planes. I use a work sharp 3000 to sharpen them.

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I also use a WS3000 to sharpen my planes and chisels. I used to do it by hand on my DMT diamond stones but I'm pretty rough on my chisels and it was taking too much time.Since I didn't feel like paying $70 for the wide blade attachment I made a bootleg stand instead. I like using a honing guide on top rather than the angle chisel port underneath because I can get full use out of the disk. I got a buddy who does car interiors and gave me a real leather console cover that I glued to an mdf disk for a cheap strop.


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I also use a WS3000 to sharpen my planes and chisels. I used to do it by hand on my DMT diamond stones but I'm pretty rough on my chisels and it was taking too much time.Since I didn't feel like paying $70 for the wide blade attachment I made a bootleg stand instead. I like using a honing guide on top rather than the angle chisel port underneath because I can get full use out of the disk. I got a buddy who does car interiors and gave me a real leather console cover that I glued to an mdf disk for a cheap strop.
Nice. I was thinking about doin something like that
 

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KemoSabe
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That's the quite the collection you've got. Almost compares to the nail guns. Where do you keep all this stuff? :laughing:

That table saw looks wicked scary. I bet that made you pay attention to what you were doing.
Little by little, I'm finding space in "the cave" to display dads stuff....including the beer stein and mug collection:thumbup:
 

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