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Discussion Starter #1
I want to order one, but I was hoping someone had some experience with them first.

I have used the block sized ones for hardscaping lots of times. Currently working on some lick and stick stone inside, and using a sharpened piece of angle iron and a hammer for basic cuts. Of course about 40% of the time on short cuts the whole stone snaps in half on me (nothing unusual, anyone familiar with the stuff knows it's like trying to hammer a tile).

I saw two cutters, one from Bon and one from Kraft. The Kraft one looks like the better choice as it can be adjusted lower and used on tin veneer also.

I would like the Bon one as it looks more rugged and can take wider material in one cut, but one of the reviews says it's terrible on cultured stone.

Any suggestions between these two?

Kraft Tool BC582 Mini Brick Splitter: Tile Cutters: Amazon.com: Industrial & Scientific


https://www.amazon.com/dp/B0002264M...ref_=pd_luc_rh_ci_mcx_mr_huc_d_01_01_t_img_lh
 

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When I did my last paver driveway, 3100', the supply yard let me borrow one for free. Tried it a few times, was not impressed with quality of cut. Went back to the saw. You may have different luck on cultured stone, whereby a clean line is not always a necessity.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
That was my line of thinking. Using a brick hammer and an angle iron get's a fine looking snapped line most of the time, the problem is the fragility of the product. It's not like using blue stone where it's almost always going to break on the score with a hammer blow, sometimes it will break in half, or completely random in another spot.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I ordered the Kraft one to try out. It will be here Wednesday.

I'm assuming it will be at least a little bit handy, at least better than a brick hammer and wedge. If not I can always use it on brick like it's intended, or just send it back.
 

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I ordered the Kraft one to try out. It will be here Wednesday.

I'm assuming it will be at least a little bit handy, at least better than a brick hammer and wedge. If not I can always use it on brick like it's intended, or just send it back.
Let me know how it works out, cultured stone is always difficult to make a good looking edge. I don’t use cultured stone much anymore since there are so many real brick and stone thin products nowadays


David
 

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Discussion Starter #7
If I head out to the job tomorrow I'll take it with me, the thing is built like a tank.

I have noticed that thin brick is coming into popularity, probably in a few years it will be the "thing to have" on new builds and remodels.
 

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Some one used to make one that was hydraulic power. It had a little handle one it like a jack would have.
I still have an old school drop weight guillotine. Don't really do cultured stone, so I would not know. I was never impressed with the drop weight either.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Why did my thread get hijacked with a paver wall?

Anyway.

I used he Kraft splitter today, works great on cultured stone. You have to make sure you get your measurements right the first time, as you can't shave with it, you need probably at least an inch of extra when you make a cut.

Huge time saver inside, I did wall cuts on 3 sections of scaffold in about 3 hours without a laborer. Measure, snap, stick on the wall. Normally we would have someone grinding outside and running cuts in and out, or a wet saw set up on the ground and someone running that.

I want to get some bigger blades for it, but it should pay for itself rapidly by saving me having a laborer running back and forth for hours doing cuts.
 

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Why did my thread get hijacked with a paver wall?

Anyway.

I used he Kraft splitter today, works great on cultured stone. You have to make sure you get your measurements right the first time, as you can't shave with it, you need probably at least an inch of extra when you make a cut.

Huge time saver inside, I did wall cuts on 3 sections of scaffold in about 3 hours without a laborer. Measure, snap, stick on the wall. Normally we would have someone grinding outside and running cuts in and out, or a wet saw set up on the ground and someone running that.

I want to get some bigger blades for it, but it should pay for itself rapidly by saving me having a laborer running back and forth for hours doing cuts.
I could see that being a huge timesaver being able to snap the stone indoors right where you’re working, would you recommend it? I’m thinking about possibly getting it


David
 

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Discussion Starter #18
I could see that being a huge timesaver being able to snap the stone indoors right where you’re working, would you recommend it? I’m thinking about possibly getting it


David
For sure, once I figured out how to use it right it's been great.

I ended up mounting the tray upside down so I could do angles, and I found it's best to put the stone in, crank it down tight with the screw, then apply pressure to split it, don't try to leave the blade up and chop it because it walks on the blade.

As I said, you still need to use a grinder on intricate stuff, but for snapping them to length it's awesome, aside from saving a ton of time by not having a laborer running back and forth it makes for a more pleasant flow while running a wall.

I don't even like using a grinder anywhere because of the dust so I usually drag out a wet saw, but that comes with it's own set of challanges when it comes to making mess.

I have two full days with it now, and the other mason there kept coming over and asking me to break rocks for him, if I had a crew going I would make sure each guy had one on the scaffold behind him.

I'm going to file it under "mandatory equipment" when doing cultured stone now. I'm sure it would also work fine or thin veneer brick or stone.
 
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