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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey all,

I have a question regarding a way to waterproof and/or prevent water damage to siding on a outbuilding that is at or below grade. I was thinking of putting a layer of felt then capping with coil then a layer of tyvek over all that then finishing with vinyl siding. I wanted to know if any of you have a better alternative or if you have run into this before.

Thanks:eek:
 

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Curmudgeon
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Nothing good can come of this. :no:
Find a solution that lowers the grade,
or raises the siding.
Water wicks, and insects follow.
If you cover it, you won't have to
watch the destruction though. :whistling
 
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
the concrete curb is at 1" to 4" above grade and the siding (original wood lap) is overlapped onto the curb app. 2". The structure was built in the early 80's and has had aluminum siding on it since the mid 90's I'm told.
The grade was lowered so the water drains away from the builing, but to lower it for the right height I would have to build a retaining wall around it.
 

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KemoSabe
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We have used cementitious backer board in similar situations. I like to keep at least 8" of backer showing above grade. It would be advantageous if the framing is treated lumber. Typically, I will run a strip of 1/2" backer, then sheath with plywood or OSB to flush everything out. Siding is installed as usual from about 1" below the top of backer. The seams in the backer should be mesh taped as usual and backer can be parged or given a Dri-Vit finish.:thumbsup:
 
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True it would be better to lower the grade, six inches is minimum code from dirt to top of stem wall. But building a retaining wall doesn't sound practical, so you're right I wouldn't worry about that.

I've seen Hardiplank siding lap over a concrete stem wall with dirt up against it, and the dirt doesn't seem to hurt it. Vinyl siding would probably hold up just as good. Putting cement backer-board along the bottom isn't a bad idea if you can make it look unnoticeable. I don't see anything wrong with a little dirt against the vinyl siding though, other than it might look like trailer trash.
 

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If I'm looking at the picture correctly, I'd dig down with my claw hammer and bend/install a coil drip cap that went below any wood framing and up the wall several inches. Then start my siding up 6 " from grade. By the way, I wouldn't let hardi come anywhere near making ground contact, let alone push dirt up on it.
 

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By the way, I wouldn't let hardi come anywhere near making ground contact, let alone push dirt up on it.
Not saying that's the best way, but I've seen dirt up against Hardiplank siding that's been there for 20 years, and it didn't do anything to it. Though it depends how rocky or muddy the dirt is too, if it's too wet then mold can grow on the siding.
 

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wannabe
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Maybe pull off the botton course of clapboards, replace with 3/4 P.T. flash then apply an Azec water table to get your vinyl up 6 or 8 inches....

Neo is right, you'd better find out what is behind the mess.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
suprisingly the wood framing is not in bad shape. There are a couple of spots that need repair next to a gagrage door and man door but the rest is pretty solid. The pictures are after removing the aluminum siding to see how bad the exterior rot was, but the aluminum siding must have protected the wood. The problem was the HO was having some water penetration and had a landscaper do a minor re-grading and now the rest of the mess is up to me.
I'm glad I found this forum, you guys have been a great resource.:notworthy
 

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Its easy to spend someone elses money but I would highly recommend some sort of sidewalk around that.No more string trimmer up against the siding or worry about dirt and grass accumilating against the wall over time(which it always does)
 

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Curmudgeon
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suprisingly the wood framing is not in bad shape. There are a couple of spots that need repair next to a gagrage door and man door but the rest is pretty solid. The pictures are after removing the aluminum siding to see how bad the exterior rot was, but the aluminum siding must have protected the wood. The problem was the HO was having some water penetration and had a landscaper do a minor re-grading and now the rest of the mess is up to me.
I'm glad I found this forum, you guys have been a great resource.:notworthy
Maybe cover the framing with
ice and water, or some such,
before some treated, and then the vinyl?
 

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I would fix it, cover with I&W, then use a treated board or Azek board for the bottom, then start the siding above it. Vinyl boards like Azek are made for things like this. Plus it looks alot nicer! :)
 

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Neo, that pic you posted........That probably would have been avoided and able to dry if that plant wasn't there.....Right?
 

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Curmudgeon
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Neo, that pic you posted........That probably would have been avoided and able to dry if that plant wasn't there.....Right?
That was a combinaton of
rotten drip caps and years of
allowing grade build up, vines,
mulch.....
In that pic it's really cleaned up. :thumbsup:
 

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Official CT Greeter!
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a little gasoline and a match...problem solved....who wants me on their corporate team? I am a thinker!...:whistling
 
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