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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Even I didn't know where to post this one!

Times are slow so I'm getting around to some home projects.

The County tried to pass a storm drain assessment for coverage over 3,200 sq. ft., it was defeated THIS time. I want to be ready for next time when it might pass.

To that extent, I've decided to xeroscape which will require removing a concrete driveway and replacing it with something porous. I like the 3/8" coral rock that they use down in the Keys. The problem is that I live on a sand hill, sugar sand to be exact.

How do I 'go green' here? My thought is some kind of fabric, maybe some road rock and then the 3/8"???
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Nice work guys!

I remember a filter type fabric from a project that I was on about 25 yrs. ago. Unfortunately the only other engineer on that project died about 10 yrs. ago.

I believe that I can just put down the structural fabric and then the stone.

Drainage here is not a problem, I live on a pile of sand. I have a storm drain in my front yard. In '04 we had hurricanes Frances and Jeanne with 'son of Ivan' in the middle. No water made it to the drain.

Wilma in '05 also didn't make it to the drain.

Fay in '08, a miss but tons of rain still didn't make it to the drain.

I'm still looking. This is also going to have to pass code.
 

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In '04 we had hurricanes Frances and Jeanne with 'son of Ivan' in the middle. No water made it to the drain.

Wilma in '05 also didn't make it to the drain.

I had been in florida for about two days when all of a sudden the news said Jeanne had done a 360 and was coming back. It hit pretty hard and I rode the storm out. I was in Southern Brevard County, a little town called Micco, just north of Indian River county. Man, talk about a welcoming committee!
 

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Alot of people here in md near the bay used crushed oyster shells for driveways and fill. Its white and abundant, and compacts well.

Its also used in the water filtration systems in local seafood farms. They pump the water over beds of the shells outdoors. Sunlight and algae provide the filtration.

On the shore up here we have a sandy top layer, with clay a few inches down, and then a layer of sand from 3-4' to about 8-10'. My septic guy made me a base layer of crushed block from a demo job that i back dragged with sand and clay. Geo fabric and then 3-4" of crusher run. The driveway frequently floods with anywhere from 2-6" of water when we get a high tide/low pressure or storm combo. Delivery trucks, rollbacks, loaders ect and no ruts or sinking.

The land here is flat for miles and miles.
 
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