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mason contractors
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
54'' "yardwood rumford" has a 4 piece bastard granite firebox and vermont granite surround. the legs were cut via a chissel fro one piece and all were rock faced by us.The northern yellow pine beams[harder than oak] and bead board my brother did.The structolite plaster we did.

The stair tower was a fun job but in a bad spot for excavating ran over the fiber glass flag poll ....carpenter offered to fix it so ....when I came back it wa 6' shorter.....they chraged me 800 for a new one if I recall . I was going to splice it..should have!
 

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mason contractors
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
re woodbox and woodstove

The H O was a rich strong minded former M.P. gun collector whom owns a 40 union plumbing contracting co.

He is very head strong.....worse than me lol
I've done much work with him in the past ranging from brick chiller buildings to boiler pads in various cities to stone walls and brick additions, not to mention his 3 son's homes. I told him to place the stove off to the left a bit..and possibly extend the face and hearth too...but he installed it his way! Never uses it anyways.
More important is the work quality or it should be.
For instance, I warned against using bastard granite and told him so, because it's layered grain would easily pop with heat, and it did imediately. That is why he built the shrowd in front but he doesnt use it much.
Jim Buckley liked the stone rumford a while back when he saw the pic and commented, "I wonder if he'd be willing to test the Rumford against the stove?...I laughed then but this past year I've been thinking of doing it with my fp and stove. The catalyst is that I lit my stove a few weeks back and it it seems basically even throughout the house to the fireplace, now that I burn with the 1-3/4'' throat...but not as warm as the fp within the room. The fuel consumption is a different story.

My point being is alot can be learned from listening to people and I was always a very good listener.

JB thanks.

Carl did you ever go to Roxbury Quarry over by me here.
It's a bastard granite quarry on Mine Hill Rd in Roxbury, CT
I haven't been there in 10 years and I'm not certain they still operate.The town has an old lumber yard too,.. real nice setting.
They would mine the stuff then have 2 guys split with a sledge and a maul...just like butter!...2''3''4''5''6'' ...unreal flat grained...nice for patios and easy pitching for walls. When pitching parrallel grain stuff we would use a narrower pitching tool and sometimes keep it off plane from the face so as not to peal it into a thinner stone. When cutting it needs back support or it razor edges or splits in two like bluestone.Sharp points help drastically as does end marking before cutting the face.
Nothing is worse than the look which results in mixing pitched faces / bellys with flat/smooth!
The old man would take his small trim stone hammer an go around the edges which basically pitches without delaminating if it's sharp.
 

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He is very head strong.....worse than me lol

I told him to place the stove off to the left a bit..and possibly extend the face and hearth too...but he installed it his way! Never uses it anyways.


More important is the work quality or it should be.
I've worked for people like that. One that I can remember wasn't the homeowner but a landscape architect. She wanted a stepping stone path with pea stone between the steps rather than a flagstone path which i had suggested. I said that with the big pine tree out back that it would be tough to keep the needles clean in that pea stone. She waved me off and I heard back from the homeowner a few years ago that everything about the backyard is great...except she HATES how difficult it is to clean up the pine needles.

I agree, quality of work is good, very good, but it's the argument about form vs function. In my opinion function is always more important.

The curved brick is very nice
 
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