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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
We are working on bring back a old barn from the depths of destruction. I have been digging out the inside and noticed the soil is VERY wet. The barn sits no more than 10' away from a swap and only about 2' above it. The soil seems to have a lot of clay and organic soil mixed together no matter how far I dig.

I need to jack up some portions of the barn since it has "sunk" over the years. I was thinking of pouring some pillars and adding new 6x6 posts but I have a feeling the pillers will sink. We need this to last at least 2 years.

So I was thinking of mushrooming the bottom of the hole for the pillers to increase the surface area of the piller to help with this. Think it will work? Any advise?

Now another issue, I may hit water when digging the holes so I would basically pour the concrete mix in the holes dry if this happens, not sure if I need add anything else to help it cure?? Never had to do this procedure before so any help would be appreciated.

Thanks Guys
Justin
 

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Depending on how deep you are going to get into this, you may want to look at helical piers or piles....they do amazing stuff with these nowadays....check out, maybe piertech.com, I think that's one that is easy to navigate...there is a concrete product that you just dump the bags in to water, it might be ok for your situation, but I've never used it, seems like a HO type product...keep us posted on progress...gl ps/ a spread footing is always better, but your wet ground is going to be the biggest hurdle...
 

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We are working on bring back a old barn from the depths of destruction. I have been digging out the inside and noticed the soil is VERY wet. The barn sits no more than 10' away from a swap and only about 2' above it. The soil seems to have a lot of clay and organic soil mixed together no matter how far I dig.

I need to jack up some portions of the barn since it has "sunk" over the years. I was thinking of pouring some pillars and adding new 6x6 posts but I have a feeling the pillers will sink. We need this to last at least 2 years.

So I was thinking of mushrooming the bottom of the hole for the pillers to increase the surface area of the piller to help with this. Think it will work? Any advise?

Now another issue, I may hit water when digging the holes so I would basically pour the concrete mix in the holes dry if this happens, not sure if I need add anything else to help it cure?? Never had to do this procedure before so any help would be appreciated.

Thanks Guys
Justin
Similar situation was discussed a couple of months ago....you might want to look back a bit. GL
 

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Why does it only need to last 2 years. Obviously the barn has stayed up for more than two years with the existing foundation/pile of rocks. I would just dig down 12", pour a 2' X 2' pad and be done with it.
 

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The conditions you describe really require soil engineers to come up with a plan, those conditions in general become EXPENSIVE to build on if you want the structure to hold. The 2 year lifespan is confusing, why bother, GMOD
 

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Sounds like nasty conditions, but there are methods of increasing the load bearing capacity of high plasticity organic clays. First step should be to have a soil test performed to determine the current capacity, this can be done pretty cheaply if you're just looking for a basic test. Usually $75-$200 if you provide the sample. You could even just use a $20 penetrometer to take several spot readings and get a general idea of what you're dealing with, but the results certainly won't be as accurate or revealing as sending a sample to a soils testing lab.

Once you know the soils load bearing capacity you can use basic math to figure out the load on your pillars, and then distribute that load as required by the soils capacity with little more than a simple pad as CJKarl suggests. Or you can take measures to increase the soils capacity, most of which are relatively easy and inexpensive.

Alternatively you can circumvent the poor soils entirely by using pilings as Rockmonster suggests. Certainly easier but potentially more expensive and certainly not as much fun as tackling the challenge head on ;)

In any case your first task is to mitigate the water. Pouring dry concrete into a hole full of water isn't going to solve any of your problems. Neither is putting a bell bottom on your pillars.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Why does it only need to last 2 years. Obviously the barn has stayed up for more than two years with the existing foundation/pile of rocks. I would just dig down 12", pour a 2' X 2' pad and be done with it.
Well we need it for a horse. Eventually this horse will be going somewhere else. As the barn sits right now, its not safe enough for me to put a live animal like a horse in it through the heavy wet snow I expect this winter.

The barn has no foundation, only wooden posts in on a rock or a cinder block which has sunk and over time the posts have rotted cause the barn to slowly collapse in some areas.

I will be jacking up and fixing some of the structure.

The 2' x 2' pad may be want I will do.


Thanks Guys
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 · (Edited)
Here are some pics of the barn.

This post is not touching at all and is rotted at the bottom.



Picture of the inside right wall. Notice no foundation.



Night shot of barn outside. Notice the back corner is falling in. That whole corner I will rebuild. I remember I had solid concrete blocks about 16" x 8" x 8". I will use those with a poured rebar reinforced concrete slab under them for monolithic support. Trying anything at this point.
 

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Seems like a general contractor would have the solution for this or at least the information they have could help, part of their job description is making foundations for houses and knowing the land it's being built in, whic i turn obv. gets check out by some sort of official, hope it helps
 
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