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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have some doors that are a gloss lacquer finish and I am trying to respray them so that they have a satin finish. However after applying two coats of satin over the gloss lacquer the finish is still at best a semi-gloss. Do I need to do something else to achieve the satin finish or should I just spray a couple more coats?
 

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Maker of Fine Sawdust
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Most lacquers use a flattening paste to adjust the sheen. After you spray your pcs you might have to wait up to two weeks before the final sheen is obtained. This happens because as the lacquer cures the film thickness becomes thinner. As it becomes thinner the flattening paste particles get closer together and cause more pronounced light scattering properties. If this is a job for yourself or not a rush job, wait a few days to see if it glares down.

The standard practice for applying finishes is to use gloss as the first (and second if needed) coat, and then the last coat is the sheen coat.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I have also been spraying some raw doors that I have stained applyed a sealer coat and then the lacquer coat using the same satin lacquer but the sheen from the raw doors to the recoat doors is still more glossy. Do you think more coats are the answer or will I have to break out the steel wool and try to "rub" the sheen down?
 

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Hard to say. Another coat should add more flatter. So it should dull it up more.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I haven't looked at it since about 15 minutes after I sprayed it so I will look at it in the morning, maybe it will be duller then if not I will spray it again and see how it looks.

Thanks
 

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Particulate Filter
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It's probably too late now but I think if you were going for uniformity I would have put two coats of semi on the raw doors first and then the two coats satin on all of them. Probably end up being much closer; although it will never be identical if you're not using the same products. Naturally make sure to stir the lacquer thoroughly to pick up the flatteners; they tend to settle out.
 

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Ok not to sound like Mr. Smart Ass but did you stir the clear coat well before spraying? Almost all clear coats start off as a gloss and flattening agents are added to dull sheens down, these agents settle very quickly and are sometimes almost solid on the bottom of the can. I like using a power mixer on these to make sure that they are well mixed. Start at the bottom and keep the blade in the material to reduce bubbles. So if the material isnt mixed well.....BOOOM shiney shiney shiney.

The reason I ask is because its a very common problem that I see constantly, but it's usually a mistake that someone makes only once :clap:
 
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