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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello-

I own a seventeen year old geodesic dome which is now in need of a new roof. House is ~1550 sq.ft., 3 dormers, no chimney, 2 flat pitched entry ways, 2 stories and only a portion of the roof is walkable. The dome is 35 ft. in diameter, a 5/8 sphere, third iteration. It is approximately 35-40 squares, as the entire house is basically roof. Here is a picture that closely resembles what I'm talking about. Note that these structures are more prone to leaks than a standard home (ugh, I've got three now).

Anyway, house is in South Carolina. This is going to be a tear off. I'm looking at using 30 year laminate shingles (GAF) at least. Any ideas as to an estimate? I've got companies lined up but would like as much info as possible beforehand.

Thanks, Y'all-
Obie
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 · (Edited)
Grumpy said:
Look for my response later today.
Thanks, Grumpy. Hey, while I've got your attention, here is ConsumerReports latest take on asphalt shingles. Does this at all jibe with your experience? I've learned that CR does not always have the best info and lacks what you have- hands on experience.

EDIT: Image edited due to ignorance.:eek:

Thanks again-
Obie
 

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Yeah I have that report and for the most part I agree with their findings. Although I have no idea what testing methods were used to arive at those findings. I like the GAF and Tamko products the most. Certianteed is ok, but I don't really like the company.

I'm just going to assume youa re right about the squares, which does seem small for these types of homes. I'm going to give a guesstimate at about: $12k for 25 squares.
 

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Obie, Just a friendly warning. Consumers Union is VERY protective of their product and reproducing it can wind you up in some really deep doo doo.
I ain't talkin' but be careful.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Teetorbilt said:
Obie, Just a friendly warning. Consumers Union is VERY protective of their product and reproducing it can wind you up in some really deep doo doo.
I ain't talkin' but be careful.
Oh, okay. I'll edit it out. I wouldn't want the site to catch any flack , either. Thanks for the heads up.

Obie
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Okay, got the fourth estimate. These are definitely the folks I want to do the job, as they seemed the most professsional, offered the most comprehensive estimate, have the best labor warranty, have been in business locally for ~20 years, and have roofed domes before. Their estimate at $12300 seems fair to me but is also about $3000 more than the others, though I think the difference comes from the knowledge of exactly what it will take to do the job right from the get go, i.e., the custom work (none of which is necessary but I like), use of Grace Ice and Water Shield on entire roof, etc.

Here's the estimate:





Like I said, it seems fair to me, particularly in light of Grumpy's guesstimate.

Obie
 

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That took my breath when they gave a lifetime warranty on a 30 year shingle. I take it that's their way of saying their work will last as long as the material. Sure has a way of grabbing attention! I give a 20 year warranty on workmanship for a 30 year shingle to accomplish the same thing and don't confuse the owner when they get alzhimers! as for the price, umm well it's a bit high but with those kind of profits, chances are they aren't going to go out of business soon for being too cheap. I also throw in 3 sheets of plywood free on all my tear offs just to offer something others don't and it gets me the job over others at times and on the rare occasion I use the plywood it isn't a noticed expense.
 

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In mya rea the average home owner lives in their home 7 years, therefore if the warranty is not transferrable; it is really a 7 year warranty. I don't know all the exclusions of their warranty but no labor warranty I've seen covers material failure.

Rare occasion? I am fixing wood in almost every roof. I just guess it's a climatic thing.
 

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What I should say is that it's rare that I use the whole three sheets. The norm here in central Ohio for my residentual customers is about one sheet for damaged wood (which is actually a low percent), and I use some to replace hat vents for ridge vents. Usually it seems the roof gets replaced when it starts leaking and before wood damage occures. I think I'm lucky to see less then 5% that requires the free three sheets. I also tell them verbally that the labor warranty goes with the house, not with the owner.

As for the statistics that sounds about right for the areas nearer to the city, but I've never checked into the average time home owners live in their house. It may be a longer average where most of my work is done. My area is mostly where people want to be just far enough out of the city to not feel cramped, but in the last 5 years housing developements have moved in and it's not stopping. (job security)
 

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Obie said:
Hello-

I own a seventeen year old geodesic dome which is now in need of a new roof. House is ~1550 sq.ft., 3 dormers, no chimney, 2 flat pitched entry ways, 2 stories and only a portion of the roof is walkable. The dome is 35 ft. in diameter, a 5/8 sphere, third iteration. It is approximately 35-40 squares, as the entire house is basically roof. Here is a picture that closely resembles what I'm talking about. Note that these structures are more prone to leaks than a standard home (ugh, I've got three now).

Anyway, house is in South Carolina. This is going to be a tear off. I'm looking at using 30 year laminate shingles (GAF) at least. Any ideas as to an estimate? I've got companies lined up but would like as much info as possible beforehand.

Thanks, Y'all-



Obie
how did that roof turn out? does your contractor travel? I am in dire straights since my roofer took me for $9,500.00 leaving windows out and bare plywood on the top 1/3 of my 32' dome roof. I put ice and water on all of it in order to get through (two winters ago.) I have yet to find anyone that knows more than I do about this roof and the venting has still got me stumped... I am a widow and must be an easy mark or too trusting of a soul.
I STILL NEED A ROOF
I do own a harley and will consider a barder system
thanks
blugenes
 

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Obie said:
Hello-

I own a seventeen year old geodesic dome which is now in need of a new roof. House is ~1550 sq.ft., 3 dormers, no chimney, 2 flat pitched entry ways, 2 stories and only a portion of the roof is walkable. The dome is 35 ft. in diameter, a 5/8 sphere, third iteration. It is approximately 35-40 squares, as the entire house is basically roof. Here is a picture that closely resembles what I'm talking about. Note that these structures are more prone to leaks than a standard home (ugh, I've got three now).

Anyway, house is in South Carolina. This is going to be a tear off. I'm looking at using 30 year laminate shingles (GAF) at least. Any ideas as to an estimate? I've got companies lined up but would like as much info as possible beforehand.

Thanks, Y'all-
Obie
how did that roof turn out? does your contractor travel? I am in dire straights since my roofer took me for $9,500.00 leaving windows out and bare plywood on the top 1/3 of my roof. which I put ice and water on all of in order to get through two winters ago. I have yet to find anyone that knows more than I do about this roof and the venting has still got me stumped... I am a widow and must be a easy mark or too trusting of a soul..
thanks
blugenes
 

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Obie,

Geodesic domes often leak especially with laminated shingles. The heavier the shingle the more likely it will suffer blow through water. Why are you considering the “bottom of the line” GAF 30 and not one of the higher quality GAF products…is it because of thickness and water blow through?

You have a very labor intense project. My recommendation is to install a quality top of the line shingle, not the bottom of the line shingle. The labor cost is similar. With quality the cost is lower per year because quality lasts longer. It also looks better.

How is this roof currently ventilated? Are there any signs of inadequate roof ventilation, i.e. mold, mildew in corners, rotted decking or fascia boards? If there is trapped moisture then a ventilation plan will be required.

Assuming there is no ventilation problem with the existing structure the way to “waterproof” the roof is to entirely cover the surface with self adhered modified bitumen membrane so there is a totally tight roofing system.

Due to the angles of the Geodesic dome it is very common for rain to blow through roof shingles. Asphalt shingles are water-shedding, not water proof. This is why we recommend a waterproof underlayment prior to installation of the shingles.

Richard Kaller
 
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