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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
To all the General Contractors out there,

I am finishing my business management degree. I am debating whether or not to go for my construction management degree as well, or pursuing a job as soon as I'm done with my business management degree this spring.

As far as education goes, what do you look for in an individual when filling a position for project management?

Sorry for making this so general right now, but I can be more detailed if this thread get going.

Thanks!
Brad
:thumbsup:
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Well in my case, I have had experience with poured walls, flat work concrete, and mainly masonry, with a general sense of everything else. I am afraid that won't be enough. I don't have any "real" project management experience, but I do believe I have the skills. This is where the question of going for my construction management degree comes into play.
 

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I've seen young men like you start out as a PM and make it and I've seen others fall flat on their face.
What I've seen that seems to work is for the young college grad to start as an assistant PM. That way, you will be on the job a lot, dealing with contractors and the everyday flow of work and if you are cut out for it, you will learn and will gain the respect of the contractors but it won't happen over night.
It sounds like you're going at it with your eyes open. You should be ok.
 

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If you can keep this one fact foremost in your efforts, you will probably do just fine.

You are not entering the field of construction so much as you are going to be learning the people in that field, and how to relate to them.

The knowledge you have. The relational experience you will have to develop.
 

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Hands on experience. How can you manage it if you don't know how to build it or haven't built it. You will need technical experience and a whole bunch of people experience. Not putting you down but you with the college education if you can't relate to the old job/street smart sub you will have one heck of a time.
 

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If you read here long enough, you will begin to recognize all kinds of contractors. You will see quiet confidence right alongside boastful arrogance. Steady progression treading the same road as impatient insistence. Quality builders and Quick Buck artists. All kinds. Because just as in the rest of life, it takes all kinds to make a world.

This will probably confuse and discourage you at first. But don't let it mold you.

There is good in the worst examples, and what you perceive as the very best people will sometimes let you down. Probably the most detrimental thing you can let happen to you is to begin telling yourself you KNOW the truth about certain types of people and to EXPECT certain behavior from all of 'them'.

All any of us can ever know is A TRUTH in a specific situation, not THE truth in general. And to 'expect' anything more than the unexpected is foohearty.
 
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Project Manager HFH..
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Degrees are good but I think hands on experience is the best education you can get.
+1

If needed a PM I would want someone with at least 6/7 years of hands on building experience.Maybe more.
 

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It sounds like you want to work for a company and not start your own.

If that's the case I would watch out for getting pigeon holed into a role and going nowhere. If you sign up with a firm to get experience you have to make sure you're going to get it.

I would look for a best of both worlds scenario. Find a company that will pay for the education and then use the benefit to boost you within the firm. All the while learning the ropes. They will be impressed by your planning and goals.
 

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To run a project you must have experience in the field, you must know how to run the job and over see it, handle inspections and know the building codes,schedule trades,etc. Best way to start is from the bottom and work your way up, don't be afraid to get your hands dirty. Without on hand experience in the field, all that education is good for office work, and I hope all those degrees come with good typing and coffee making skills.
Good luck to you :thumbsup:
 
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