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Discussion Starter #1
A buddy of mine who's a small time general contractor told me that I could legally contract a certain amount of electrical work each year if I went ahead and got a general contractors license. I'm not sure what that involves, but do any of you know if that is true?

Right now I'm a gas piper who occasionally does an additional outlet, or ties in electrical for a new water heater, I would like to be totally above board, and do it more often than once in a blue moon, but couldn't possibly get my electricians card. Is this General Contractors license thing a good loophole? Thanks.
 

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[
QUOTE=skatchmo]A buddy of mine who's a small time general contractor told me that I could legally contract a certain amount of electrical work each year if I went ahead and got a general contractors license. I'm not sure what that involves, but do any of you know if that is true?

Right now I'm a gas piper who occasionally does an additional outlet, or ties in electrical for a new water heater, I would like to be totally above board, and do it more often than once in a blue moon, but couldn't possibly get my electricians card. Is this General Contractors license thing a good loophole? Thanks.
[/QUOTE]

My county has a Mechanics license which allows a limited amount of gas piping and electrical work associated with retrofiting a furnace, boiler, etc. Our GC license does not cover any electrical, plumbing, gas, venting, or other licensed trades. But like Mike says. Find out the facts in your area.
 

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Most of my state does not require a license at all to do electrical work. You just write on the side of the family station wagon with a crayola "Electrikkal Kontraktor", and you are one. Every state, county, and municipality has different rules on that sort of stuff. It is generally a part of every mechanical trade to have to do a certain amount of very limited electrical work to effect their installation, such as installing whips or making final connections. Running an entire new branch circuit should be the job of the electrician.
 

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Most GC's here came up through the ranks and hold another license, usually carpentry. I can't explain why that is. I know of one that was disgusted with subs and went on to get his electrical and plumbing licenses. The assumtion that a GC can do anything is, generally, a falsehood. They can sub most anything, but not actually do it without holding a license.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks you guys, for the responses. I'll be in contact shortly with the cities and counties I work in up here in the Puget Sound area.
 

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In WA with a GC you can do everything. Except full time electrical or plumbing. Which both those trades need cert's from L&I. Electrical inspection is the only inspection done by the state L&I office. All others are usually done by city or county inspectors.

But you probably know this. From what my insurace agent told me having a GC license will increase you bond and insurance. Might be cheaper to sub out the electrical.
 
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